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(Yahoo)   Nearly 40% of all Americans ages 18 to 24 were enrolled in college this year, ensuring us a future of very well educated fast food workers and Walmart clerks   (fe17.story.media.ac4.yahoo.com) divider line 167
    More: Interesting, community colleges, tuition  
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4194 clicks; posted to Main » on 21 Nov 2009 at 11:03 AM (5 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2009-11-21 10:20:51 AM  
With the economy the way it is, I wonder what the stats are for the 25-35, 35-50, etc.
 
2009-11-21 10:43:06 AM  
dbirchall: 35-50

My Older graduates in December next year and my Younger...? Anyway, now that I have a little more freedom I am considering going back for a nursing degree. Why not?
 
2009-11-21 11:01:43 AM  
Dancin_In_Anson:

Did you happen to hear anything about the t-bone just north of you on 277 and 92 last weekend? Yeaaa. My daughter was one of the ones airlifted to Hendrick. She was driving her friend's car when the Mustang went through the stop sign. I spent a little time in Anson a few days ago over that.

Cpl. Wheeler worked the scene.
 
2009-11-21 11:05:35 AM  
40% of them are in college, but I'm guessing it's more like 10% that will graduate.
 
2009-11-21 11:07:03 AM  
pbpl.physics.ucla.edu
 
2009-11-21 11:09:28 AM  
RTFA Submittard: "...but the increase in college attendance over the last year has been entirely driven by the increasing number of students attending community college....enrollments at four-year colleges has remained stable over the past year."

The increase is entirely from community colleges, which tend to focus on trade skills, not 4 year colleges.

So you're going to have a lot more plumbers, electricians, etc, which is a damn good thing.
 
2009-11-21 11:09:30 AM  
dbirchall: With the economy the way it is, I wonder what the stats are for the 25-35, 35-50, etc.

Up until this past spring I was taking college classes nonstop for the past three years. The age range for the courses I took on campus was from 18 years old to late 40's or so. But what was really great is I could take a lot of courses on line. The only times I had to go to campus was to see the Bursar, buy books or hand in a project. Online classes are the best thing, and who really needs to hear a professor drone on for two hours about whatever subject your studying?
 
2009-11-21 11:09:35 AM  
OMG more libs!
 
2009-11-21 11:10:07 AM  
And about 40% of those quit before the semester ended.
 
2009-11-21 11:10:27 AM  
Q: How do you get an English Major off your porch?
A: Pay him for the pizza!

/you want fries with that?
 
2009-11-21 11:11:29 AM  
Save for those working towards a computer engineering degree.
If I'm unemployable after all this then it's probably safe to say there won't be a wal-mart for me to work at.
 
2009-11-21 11:13:33 AM  
skinink: The age range for the courses I took on campus was from 18 years old to late 40's or so. But what was really great is I could take a lot of courses on line There was still lots of barely legal tail to hit on.

/ftfy
//ftfm?
 
2009-11-21 11:14:04 AM  
What happens to 10 high school grads:
1. enters family biz
2. joins military
(other 8 say, "I'm going to college")
3. parties out of college
4. flunks out of college
5. see #'s 3&4
6. see #'s 3&4
7. graduates but becomes underemployed
8. graduates but becomes underemployed
9. graduates and works in chosen career
10. graduates and works in chosen career

2/10 = 20%
current % of high school grads that become professionals (trend consistant since 1950): 20%

/underemployed
 
2009-11-21 11:14:59 AM  
Eyebleach: Did you happen to hear anything about the t-bone just north of you on 277 and 92 last weekend? Yeaaa. My daughter was one of the ones airlifted to Hendrick. She was driving her friend's car when the Mustang went through the stop sign. I spent a little time in Anson a few days ago over that.

Email in profile. Please holler at me.
 
2009-11-21 11:17:11 AM  
I worked the scene and was one of the guys that loaded your daughter into the helo. I want to know about someone else that was involved.
 
2009-11-21 11:17:21 AM  
hyperflame: RTFA Submittard: "...but the increase in college attendance over the last year has been entirely driven by the increasing number of students attending community college....enrollments at four-year colleges has remained stable over the past year."

The increase is entirely from community colleges, which tend to focus on trade skills, not 4 year colleges.

So you're going to have a lot more plumbers, electricians, etc, which is a damn good thing.


community college is a good way to go for an associates of to get the basic classes out of the way at a fraction of the cost. Then, transfer to a 4 year to finish up.

Trade schools are wonderful. We need people with skills not wasting time learning about wymyns studies when they realy want to be an electrician...or electrical engineer as we called it in kollej
 
2009-11-21 11:18:27 AM  
College is the new "high school"
 
2009-11-21 11:25:29 AM  
This thread is turning interesting in comments v story.
 
2009-11-21 11:25:36 AM  
bmihura: College is the new "high school"

Except kids don't come out of high school owing $50k in loans.
 
2009-11-21 11:27:58 AM  
skinink: dbirchall: With the economy the way it is, I wonder what the stats are for the 25-35, 35-50, etc.

Up until this past spring I was taking college classes nonstop for the past three years. The age range for the courses I took on campus was from 18 years old to late 40's or so. But what was really great is I could take a lot of courses on line. The only times I had to go to campus was to see the Bursar, buy books or hand in a project. Online classes are the best thing, and who really needs to hear a professor drone on for two hours about whatever subject your studying?


If the person teaching your lecture is nothing more than a walking power-point version of the book, then online classes are just as good.... That will tend to happen with classes heavy on pointless trivia and memorization.

If you find that online classes aren't tough enough, try taking something more challenging and you might find that having an actual teacher is worth your time.
 
2009-11-21 11:28:22 AM  
dogdaze:
10. graduates and works in chosen career


because i chose a field that i had a talent for and has continued to grow despite the sucky economy.

computer science... not prostitution.

/my architect sister sells furniture, and my graphic designer sister is a stay at home mom of three army wife.
 
2009-11-21 11:28:42 AM  
generaltimmy: community college is a good way to go for an associates of to get the basic classes out of the way at a fraction of the cost. Then, transfer to a 4 year to finish up.

You overestimate the drive of the majority of community college students
 
2009-11-21 11:28:43 AM  
A college education doesn't mean as much as it used to, Submitard, or you would be right.
 
2009-11-21 11:29:19 AM  
Meepzoid: Q: How do you get an English Major off your porch?
A: Pay him for the pizza!

/you want fries with that?


What is the difference between a pizza and an English Major?

A pizza can feed a family of four.

/English Major
 
2009-11-21 11:29:44 AM  
DrewCurtisJr: bmihura: College is the new "high school"

Except kids don't come out of high school owing $50k in loans.


This. Yes, college is overpriced high school nowadays. Only about 30-40% of the graduates from U of Alabama law school (one of the best public options in the country) had jobs upon graduation this year. They are all over $100,000 in debt. Sad.
 
2009-11-21 11:30:57 AM  
haddie: Meepzoid: Q: How do you get an English Major off your porch?
A: Pay him for the pizza!

/you want fries with that?

What is the difference between a pizza and an English Major?

A pizza can feed a family of four.

/English Major


Everyone knows English majors don't deliver pizzas. English majors work at Borders.
 
2009-11-21 11:31:14 AM  
Ikken Hisatsu: A college education doesn't mean as much as it used to, Submitard, or you would be right.

You didn't really get the headline, did you?
 
2009-11-21 11:32:03 AM  
I've been in college for most of my adult life. I have had a great life.

/still ride a bike to school
//four weeks off for christmas
///no responsibility at all
 
2009-11-21 11:34:39 AM  
Nogale: haddie: Meepzoid: Q: How do you get an English Major off your porch?
A: Pay him for the pizza!

/you want fries with that?

What is the difference between a pizza and an English Major?

A pizza can feed a family of four.

/English Major

Everyone knows English majors don't deliver pizzas. English majors work at Borders.


I used to run a sweatshop, teach, work as a hotel manager, candy store clerk, CD store clerk, scuba instructor, waiter and (briefly) construction worker. Now I am starting a backpacking business.

So far, other than in grammar and spelling in email correspondence, I have used about 0% of my degree in the "real world". Even when I was an English teacher, nobody ever seemed to question or inquire as to my knowledge of possible homosexual undertones in A Winter's Tale.

Strange, as one would expect that to be everyone's first choice in topics of introductory conversation.
 
2009-11-21 11:37:55 AM  
My issue with most stories and anecdotes about college education somehow being a waste is that it presumes that an educated populace is somehow bad. Education is good for everyone, even your plumbers and mechanics.
 
2009-11-21 11:38:09 AM  
Life sucks.

/3rd return to college after 90% of co-workers outsourced
/41
/The girls are still money.
 
2009-11-21 11:39:10 AM  
College is stupid, and I say this as a holder of two degrees from an expensive private college and as an employee as another expensive private college.

I work in financial aid. My job is to help kids pay for college, and that typically means loans. Right now, I work at a medical school, so that's a little different, but in the past I've had to certify $40,000 loans per year for students getting an English degree. $40k per year, btw.

What we need in this country is to stop subsidizing about 70% of the private colleges (yes, this will leave me unemployed, but I'm ok with that) and take the money and increase community colleges.

Most kids don't NEED a four year degree, and only about 5% need to go to an expensive private college (I sure didn't, but I managed to do it with minimum debt).

We need apprenticeships. We need associates degrees. We need professional certificates and post high school technical training.

We also need to stop demanding 4 year degrees for office jobs. I do not use either of my degrees for my highly specialized and very technical job. I've been doing it for 7 years, and I've learned on the job. My degrees simply make my resume look good, but have NOTHING to do with my day to day work. I'd bet that the majority of office workers can say the same thing.

Eyebleach: My daughter was one of the ones airlifted to Hendrick.

Damn. I'm so sorry- is she ok?
 
2009-11-21 11:39:53 AM  
Ikken Hisatsu: A college education doesn't mean as much as it used to

What a travesty, too. I'd like to see four-year undergraduate programs return to aiming for the upper-quartile. Those who benefit from bloated universities and dumbed-down curricula for the masses would certainly disagree, though.
 
2009-11-21 11:41:16 AM  
Unfortunately that includes county colleges, liberal arts majors, and online colleges... which are all worth about as much as degree from Walmart U.
 
2009-11-21 11:43:52 AM  
College graduate here. English major, Walmart employee. Never had to worry about getting laid off. The economy has not affected me. Could be worse (shrug).
 
2009-11-21 11:44:06 AM  
xuhuang1: My issue with most stories and anecdotes about college education somehow being a waste is that it presumes that an educated populace is somehow bad. Education is good for everyone, even your plumbers and mechanics.

Technical training and job skills are good for everyone. Your plumber does not need to know how to deconstruct a novel.

Now, if he wants to learn, I'm a huge fan of adult education classes based on interest. These classes cost a couple hundred bucks, and they're simply interesting.

I wish we could instill a love of LIFETIME learning in our citizens. There are plenty of college educated people who get their degree and never pick up a book after.

The library should be your favorite place.
 
2009-11-21 11:46:10 AM  
With the economy the way it is, I'm definitely considering going back to college
 
2009-11-21 11:47:50 AM  
You can make more money becoming a electrical engineer these days than somebody who sinks thousands into a bullshiat four-year school. Wish I wasn't completely techno-illiterate.

For farks sake, you can't even drink on campus anymore without paying bullshiat fines ("donation" to FDU's financial mismanagement and incompetence) and being forced to attend a goddamn anti-drinking class! Thankfully, I'm smart enough to not get caught whenever I torch up or drink on campus. Being a commuter also helps...a lot.

Don't get suckered and really weigh your options before enrolling in a four-year school. There is no shame in being a plumber or electrician, they can make insane money these days (Security companies pay very nice). If you do, commute if you can. Dorm life is not worth the money, period.

/another sucker
//only at my POS school for the decent CJ program
 
2009-11-21 11:48:14 AM  
dogdaze: What happens to 10 high school grads:
1. enters family biz
2. joins military
(other 8 say, "I'm going to college")
3. parties out of college
4. flunks out of college
5. see #'s 3&4
6. see #'s 3&4
7. graduates but becomes underemployed
8. graduates but becomes underemployed
9. graduates and works in chosen career
10. graduates and works in chosen career

2/10 = 20%
current % of high school grads that become professionals (trend consistant since 1950): 20%

/underemployed


You forgot 11. graduates but becomes a stay-at-home mom.
 
2009-11-21 11:50:22 AM  
I love it. We complain about how uneducated people are, then make fun of people who don't get the "approved" type of education.
 
2009-11-21 11:50:35 AM  
Firebug: Dorm life is not worth the money, period.

But people think they deserve the four year college "experience" that they saw on "Road Trip".
 
2009-11-21 11:52:09 AM  
Firebug: You can make more money becoming a electrical engineer these days than somebody who sinks thousands into a bullshiat four-year school. Wish I wasn't completely techno-illiterate.

For farks sake, you can't even drink on campus anymore without paying bullshiat fines ("donation" to FDU's financial mismanagement and incompetence) and being forced to attend a goddamn anti-drinking class! Thankfully, I'm smart enough to not get caught whenever I torch up or drink on campus. Being a commuter also helps...a lot.

Don't get suckered and really weigh your options before enrolling in a four-year school. There is no shame in being a plumber or electrician, they can make insane money these days (Security companies pay very nice). If you do, commute if you can. Dorm life is not worth the money, period.

/another sucker
//only at my POS school for the decent CJ program


You do know you need a four year degree at least to be an electrical engineer (or pretty much any type of engineer), right? But yes, the money is good.

/Electrical Engineer
 
2009-11-21 11:52:24 AM  
In my experience, a good portion of the people showing up as freshmen have no business being in college, and at best will learn what they should have before leaving high school.
 
2009-11-21 11:53:35 AM  
kmwheel: dogdaze: What happens to 10 high school grads:
1. enters family biz
2. joins military
(other 8 say, "I'm going to college")
3. parties out of college
4. flunks out of college
5. see #'s 3&4
6. see #'s 3&4
7. graduates but becomes underemployed
8. graduates but becomes underemployed
9. graduates and works in chosen career
10. graduates and works in chosen career

2/10 = 20%
current % of high school grads that become professionals (trend consistant since 1950): 20%

/underemployed

You forgot 11. graduates but becomes a stay-at-home mom.


Or 12: Dropping out nine months after getting plowed in a dorm room bathroom.
 
2009-11-21 11:54:28 AM  
What part of "College of Management" can you not read? I'm going to be a very well educated fast food *manager* thank you very much!
 
2009-11-21 11:55:17 AM  
Firebug: You can make more money becoming a electrical engineer these days than somebody who sinks thousands into a bullshiat four-year school. Wish I wasn't completely techno-illiterate.

Newsflash: Usually you need a four year degree to be an electrical engineer.

/Pursuing an MS in Microelectronic Engineering
 
2009-11-21 11:55:52 AM  
How dare so many people try to improve their lives through education - HOW DARE THEY!

Seriously, it doesn't matter if they make it all the way through or what they do when the leave school - education is a good thing.
 
2009-11-21 11:56:06 AM  
I was about to graduate in December with a degree in history, but recently realized that I'm about eleven credits away from a double-major in history and geography. Definitely spending the extra semester it would take in order to that earn that second major in there. Hopefully, that will help in the job market.

/can take all the help I can get if I don't want to move far away from Ohio immediately
 
2009-11-21 11:56:08 AM  
jjorsett: In my experience, a good portion of the people showing up as freshmen have no business being in college, and at best will learn what they should have before leaving high school.

Or they'll just play Wow (or Everquest back when I was in school) for two semesters straight until they flunk out and move back in with mommy.
 
2009-11-21 11:57:00 AM  
what_now: Firebug: Dorm life is not worth the money, period.

But people think they deserve the four year college "experience" that they saw on "Road Trip".


Don't I?

/ just sayin'
 
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