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(Palm Beach Post)   Town proposes raising fine for too-tall grass to $1000 a day. "Code enforcement needs a larger hammer."   (palmbeachpost.com) divider line 144
    More: Florida, Jupiter, Councilman Robert Friedman, Stefan Harzen, doing business, Building Department Director Robert Lecky, free will, Town Manager Andy Lukasik, Code Enforcement Director Frank Melillo  
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4774 clicks; posted to Main » on 18 Nov 2009 at 10:40 AM (4 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2009-11-18 12:09:56 PM
Oh fark it. Just set the house on fire and call it a day.
 
2009-11-18 12:10:19 PM
Jackson Herring: pla: So while I normally step to the front of the line to berate ordinances such as this, this time, I really have to give the town a pass for having a reasonable limit... This doesn't affect people even semi-regularly mowing their "lawns", it affects people who completely ignore their "overgrown yard of weeds".

Why do you think it's reasonable to have any limit?


What a next door neighbors lawn looks like doesn't mean much to me. It's the wildlife (like snakes) wandering onto mine on a daily basis that gives me the red ass.
 
2009-11-18 12:12:13 PM
Smarshmallow: Smackledorfer: Note: I don't really care about grass all that much, and I think most HOAs take things too far, but I really don't have a problem with society forming rules. My definition of being free does not require that my neighbor be allowed to have a yard like Fred Sanford's.

Your community's rights over your private property should be limited to safety, zoning, etc. It should not allow the majority to force you to comply with their aesthetic standards.


And nests of snakes isn't a safety concern?
 
2009-11-18 12:13:46 PM
ThematicDevice: pla: So while I normally step to the front of the line to berate ordinances such as this, this time, I really have to give the town a pass for having a reasonable limit... This doesn't affect people even semi-regularly mowing their "lawns", it affects people who completely ignore their "overgrown yard of weeds".

Heaven forbid someone has a meadow...


Meadow= park
Meadow!= neighborhood.

/I agree with the anti-hoa sentiment, but that was something of a strawman.
 
2009-11-18 12:14:36 PM
kvinesknows: meadows are usually extremely full of mice. You just cant see them because of the meadowiness.

I can't see them because they get eaten by a host of predators ranging from foxes to the occasional redtail hawk. Judging by what the cats catch its typically moles outside, mice only ever seem to be caught if they're in the house.
 
2009-11-18 12:15:22 PM
Who the hell lives in a city and has a yard big enough to have a god damn meadow? WTF people... WTF?
 
2009-11-18 12:15:57 PM
ihatedumbpeople: "The town code regulates items such as when garbage cans can be placed outside, noise volume, parking of boats, heights of fences, the number of tenants and landscaping. Lawns cannot be higher than eight inches in developed residential areas."

so...not only can these assholes tell you your lawn is too high, but they can tell you when you can pull out the garbage, where you can park your boat, how high you can make your fence...?

A-holes. F that.


I used to do code enforcement, so I'm getting a kick...

Most cities have codes like this in place already. I know in our particular town, the city code just mirrors the State wide noxious weed ordinance.

Though, we rarely dealt in fines. Mostly we'd show up at your house, tell you that you had five days to cut the grass. After the five days, we'd show up with a crew and charge them $250.
 
2009-11-18 12:19:40 PM
sonder: Having a lawn is wasteful and retarded anyway. Dig that vampire up and plant a garden.

Re read what you just typed there champ. Define "wasteful". Gardens take a LOT of water and maintenance too.
 
2009-11-18 12:21:19 PM
pla: wage0048 : How big is your lawn that it takes 8 hours to mow?

Not 8 hours, but mine actually takes me the better part of an afternoon (4+ hours), without even bagging the clippings (thank Toro for mulching mowers!)... 2 acres of lawn, with tons of annoying "landscaping" (meaning irregularly shaped flowerbeds and trees) features. And that doesn't count the hour of prep-time picking up sticks and such from the perimeter.

And I've seen bigger... So yeah, I can see 8 hours of mowing. Not for a perfectly flat rectangular quarter acre lot, but anywhere you have "natural" terrain and lots of it, yard maintenance turns into a full-day chore


Okay, that's a bit bigger than the lawn I mowed growing up (about 3 quarters of an acre of mowable lawn after subtracting the footprint of the house and driveway), which took me just under an hour if I went non-stop.

The self-propelled lawnmower actually slowed me down (I would've preferred to walk slightly faster than it went at max speed).
 
2009-11-18 12:21:32 PM
Wrt "it hurts my property value" - which btw means "what I want to sell for", since I can't believe anyone wants to pay higher property taxes and that would be the only result of higher property value for someone settled:

Why exactly do I care what your property value is? What you want is for me to subsidize you by netting you more cash when you sell. Explain to me why I owe you money. What is my incentive? You want me to spend money so that you make money? fark you; fark you and the .02 whore that banged a mangy cocker spaniel to get you. You want things fixed? Then I want a cut of the profits when you sell the house. After all, fairs fair; if I do work for your benefit, then capitalism says you pay for my labor - so either cough up the cash or shut up
 
2009-11-18 12:21:43 PM
That Guy...From That Show!: And nests of snakes isn't a safety concern?

No actually, most snakes do not pose a safety risk to you, and they keep down the mouse population. The only two venomous snakes in my area prefer rocky woodland habitats, not meadows.
 
2009-11-18 12:29:14 PM
phalamir: Wrt "it hurts my property value" - which btw means "what I want to sell for", since I can't believe anyone wants to pay higher property taxes and that would be the only result of higher property value for someone settled:

Why exactly do I care what your property value is? What you want is for me to subsidize you by netting you more cash when you sell. Explain to me why I owe you money. What is my incentive? You want me to spend money so that you make money? fark you; fark you and the .02 whore that banged a mangy cocker spaniel to get you. You want things fixed? Then I want a cut of the profits when you sell the house. After all, fairs fair; if I do work for your benefit, then capitalism says you pay for my labor - so either cough up the cash or shut up


Thats why they created HOA's. You agreed to the HOA and to do the work when you bought your home.
 
2009-11-18 12:35:57 PM
phalamir: Wrt "it hurts my property value" - which btw means "what I want to sell for", since I can't believe anyone wants to pay higher property taxes and that would be the only result of higher property value for someone settled:

Why exactly do I care what your property value is? What you want is for me to subsidize you by netting you more cash when you sell. Explain to me why I owe you money. What is my incentive? You want me to spend money so that you make money? fark you; fark you and the .02 whore that banged a mangy cocker spaniel to get you. You want things fixed? Then I want a cut of the profits when you sell the house. After all, fairs fair; if I do work for your benefit, then capitalism says you pay for my labor - so either cough up the cash or shut up


Sounds like the home my parents bought when I was a kid in the 70s. Bought a 3BDR 2.5 BA "starter" house with orange shag carpet in the East Bay Area of CA for $50k. Sold it for $180k 4 years later. This was 1982. Last I heard the property was up again for a "bargain" price of $950k.

Who in their right mind pays that for some 40 year old basic, nothing special house in the middle of the suburbs? Oh yeah, the last idiot that's trying to unload it now.
 
2009-11-18 12:36:48 PM
Having been ticketed for having too tall grass and being hauled to court over it and paying a $500 fine im finding this thread amusing...

/still has tall grass, it was cheaper than paying for the mower repairs and gasoline ..(2 acre yard)
 
2009-11-18 12:44:36 PM
shtychkn: Thats why they created HOA's. You agreed to the HOA and to do the work when you bought your home.

The article is about town ordinances.

Town Government =/= HOA
 
2009-11-18 12:44:53 PM
ThematicDevice: That Guy...From That Show!: And nests of snakes isn't a safety concern?

No actually, most snakes do not pose a safety risk to you, and they keep down the mouse population. The only two venomous snakes in my area prefer rocky woodland habitats, not meadows.


True, most aren't venomous. Tell ya what, I'll come over to your house and bite you (or get very close and threaten to) once a week and we'll see if you have a problem with it.
 
2009-11-18 12:45:17 PM
fanbladesaresharp: sonder: Having a lawn is wasteful and retarded anyway. Dig that vampire up and plant a garden.

Re read what you just typed there champ. Define "wasteful". Gardens take a LOT of water and maintenance too.


Yeah, but you can't eat grass.

Well, you can. But grass isn't exactly tomatoes and peppers.
 
2009-11-18 12:45:22 PM
ThematicDevice: kvinesknows: meadows are usually extremely full of mice. You just cant see them because of the meadowiness.

I can't see them because they get eaten by a host of predators ranging from foxes to the occasional redtail hawk. Judging by what the cats catch its typically moles outside, mice only ever seem to be caught if they're in the house.


I'll play your game. Fine, when my neighbor lets his house and yard return to its most natural state, I won't have to worry about the vermin. Just the foxes, wolves, and bears.
 
2009-11-18 12:58:08 PM
If your grass is over 12" high it is no longer a lawn, it's a hay field. Move to the country if you do not want to keep your property in order. When you don't keep up the appearance of your home, the value of mine goes down.
Having said that, $1000.00 for a first time offense seems rather high.
 
2009-11-18 01:00:45 PM
www.linorulli.com
 
2009-11-18 01:02:13 PM
All this biatching about HOA's is retarded. Are you retards?
 
2009-11-18 01:05:28 PM
Smackledorfer: I'll play your game. Fine, when my neighbor lets his house and yard return to its most natural state, I won't have to worry about the vermin. Just the foxes, wolves, and bears.

The wolves are likely not particularly interested in mice, and do just find in the woods, and the bear is likely far more interested in someones bird feeder or a blueberry bush then with the meadow.

But yes, wolves, black bears, and foxes are all in my area, and they have yet to cause a problem. Black bears will avoid a confrontation if they can, and like I said they are not going to be attracted/disinterested by the presence or lack of a meadow. Seriously, animals have habitats, they have areas they prefer to be and areas they prefer to avoid. A meadow will attract dear, meadow birds, insects to pollinate your garden and because it will quickly attract trees you have a steady supply of transplants for the rest of your yard.

As far as a fox, why do you care? Its not going to attack you and I doubt you raise chickens.

I don't need to live in a sterile environment where I've killed every single living thing for five miles around me. I'm not much one for Tamerlane's aesthetics. The ability for me to watch pheasants, deer, foxes, hawks, song birds, hummingbirds, butterflies, and many more animals is why I prefer to live in a more rural area. Plenty of people seem to be attracted to this idea of living in this area, moving to small communities on cul de sac named things like "prancing deer meadow" because it sounds like safe and comforting place to raise a family. But as it turns out they are terrified of the idea of there being a deer or a meadow anywhere near them.
 
2009-11-18 01:13:03 PM
ThematicDevice: nd many more animals is why I prefer to live in a more rural area.

And then you are not living in an area that would be part of the problem are you? This is about people living in Cities/Towns and the rules they must follow to live in those places. Dont like it... well then.. live in a more rural area, such as you do.
 
2009-11-18 01:13:14 PM
I'm thinking this is a means to an end for them. What I mean is, they fine the homeowner, probably an elderly or disabled person, to the point of them owing tens of thousands of dollars, take them to court, get a judgement, and have their property sold on the courthouse steps to satisfy the judgement. Some neighbor gets a house for a bargain!
 
2009-11-18 01:14:50 PM
phalamir: Wrt "it hurts my property value" - which btw means "what I want to sell for", since I can't believe anyone wants to pay higher property taxes and that would be the only result of higher property value for someone settled:

Why exactly do I care what your property value is? What you want is for me to subsidize you by netting you more cash when you sell. Explain to me why I owe you money. What is my incentive? You want me to spend money so that you make money? fark you; fark you and the .02 whore that banged a mangy cocker spaniel to get you. You want things fixed? Then I want a cut of the profits when you sell the house. After all, fairs fair; if I do work for your benefit, then capitalism says you pay for my labor - so either cough up the cash or shut up


It is called the broken window effect. When one piece of property becomes neglected, over time the entire neighborhood will decline. The place I just sold last spring was in such a neighborhood. My immediate neighbors kept their property up, but slowly but surely the properties surrounding us were becoming seedier and seedier. Four people on our block had sold, and the new owners turned the houses into rentals. Lawns were either overgrown or died from lack of water. Junk cars started to get parked on the street, trash and furniture on the neglected lawns, etc.

You can live like a white trash hillbilly if you wish, but that just reflects on you, and as members of a community the rest of those in your neighborhood have the right to first talk with you, and if that goes no where then code enforcement must get involved.
 
2009-11-18 01:19:40 PM
ThematicDevice: That Guy...From That Show!: And nests of snakes isn't a safety concern?

No actually, most snakes do not pose a safety risk to you, and they keep down the mouse population. The only two venomous snakes in my area prefer rocky woodland habitats, not meadows.


I disagree. He could see one and go running, screaming like a little girl, into the street and get hit by a car.

There are real dangers.
 
2009-11-18 01:20:46 PM
FTA's comments: "What the government did not tell you dummies in JUPITER is that a certain politicians cousin owns a lawn mowing service..."


teehee
 
2009-11-18 01:21:45 PM
Devil's Playground: If your grass is over 12" high it is no longer a lawn, it's a hay field. Move to the country if you do not want to keep your property in order. When you don't keep up the appearance of your home, the value of mine goes down.
Having said that, $1000.00 for a first time offense seems rather high.


The value of your home is only what the buyer is willing to pay for it. Until then it's just a number on a piece of paper.
 
2009-11-18 01:23:27 PM
Devil's Playground: If your grass is over 12" high it is no longer a lawn, it's a hay field. Move to the country if you do not want to keep your property in order.

It is in order, it's reducing water runoff, it's increasing biodiversity, it's creating a place to pick the most preferred saplings, it's attracting the insects which pollinate my garden. It's attracting the birds which eat the insects. I don't need to use water in the middle of a drought, I don't need to use pesticides, I don't need douse my lawn with nitrogen. In fact as far as my impact on those around me, my yard is much much lower impact then yours.

I'm not causing the city to spend money upgrading the rainwater runoff system, I'm not causing damage to the recreational fishermen by choking the ponds with algae. For people who enjoy hunting it is habitats like my yard which allow the area to sustain sufficient deer that they can be hunted. For farmers in my area the bees that are attracted and become more abundant because of my flowers help pollinate their crops. Helping them in part become more profitable. Which helps my town keep the 'character' which keeps property values high.
 
2009-11-18 01:24:20 PM
fanbladesaresharp: The value of your home is only what the buyer is willing to pay for it.

And people are willing to pay less for a property that is bordered by poorly-maintained lots. Derp.
 
2009-11-18 01:24:27 PM
kvinesknows: "Last year Jupiter's seven-person Code Enforcement Division collected about $39,000 in fines, according to town records."


Seven freakin people and they collected an measly 39K in fines? WTF? really? this makes sense somehow? I sure hope they work on commision or something. 50,000+ residents means what... 25,000 homes max and they need 7 people to enforce the rules?


They are paying 7 People to collect $39,000 per year....

Lets see...average Salary of say $30,000 times 7 = $210,000
$39,000-$210,000= -$ 171,000 in revenue.....No wonder they need to raise the price...
 
2009-11-18 01:27:37 PM
kvinesknows: ThematicDevice: nd many more animals is why I prefer to live in a more rural area.

And then you are not living in an area that would be part of the problem are you? This is about people living in Cities/Towns and the rules they must follow to live in those places. Dont like it... well then.. live in a more rural area, such as you do.


Nope, because the ruralish area I live in becomes more suburban every year. I live on the outskirts of a surburban town and in my area there are constantly new developments of people who think that the nature is scary and dangerous. People who move next to a farm because of its wonderful 'character' but get upset that the cows smell, or are convinced that the field the farmer leaves fallow for a year is going to kill their kids in their sleep.
 
2009-11-18 01:28:26 PM
i30.photobucket.com
 
2009-11-18 01:29:25 PM
ThematicDevice

Clearly you don't live in a municipality that would be negatively impacted by your property management style.

A hayfield in the middle of a manicured development is a little different, no?
 
2009-11-18 01:30:11 PM
ThematicDevice: The wolves are likely not particularly interested in mice, and do just find in the woods, and the bear is likely far more interested in someones bird feeder or a blueberry bush then with the meadow.

So you would be against allowing someone to buy property in a neighborhood and turn it into grasslands, but you draw the line at woodlands because that is what the wolves are interested in?

I'm just trying to narrow down where you draw the line on things here. Is a pig farm next door to you ok? Should those bear-attracting blueberry bushes be allowed? Yes, I am being silly, but so are you.

ThematicDevice: Seriously, animals have habitats, they have areas they prefer to be and areas they prefer to avoid.

So will there are will there not be foxes in the middle of a suburban neighborhood after a handful of houses let their property run wild? Because your earlier claim was that keeping a meadow in your front yard would NOT cause a vermin problem on the grounds that natural predation will take care of it.

My grandpa owns a place out in the country. 15 acres. Its very nice. He mows near the house and the vermin pretty much stay where he lets the grass stay tall, and 7 acres of it is forest. The ecosystem pretty much takes care of itself. I will admit, however, that you can definitely smell the pig farm 3 doors down.

This would not apply when you have numerous small properties close together and a house within 15 feet of your own, with a yard within 6 feet of your home, is allowed to run wild.

Its a great place to live. But it isn't everyone's cup of tea, and it doesn't belong in the middle of a suburban neighborhood.
 
2009-11-18 01:32:13 PM
GoldSpider: And people are willing to pay less for a property that is bordered by poorly-maintained lots. Derp.

A meadow is not poorly maintained.

You know what happens to a poorly maintained meadow? It becomes a forest. One year of not maintaining it and you might have three or four good sized saplings, three or four years and you'll likely have the beginnings of a new growth forest as the fast growers start setting up shop and those small sapplings likely dominate the area.
 
2009-11-18 01:32:49 PM
Is the limit 8 inches standing up, or if the blades of grass are 8 inches in length? How many blades of grass have to be over 8 inches before a fine is assessed? The entire yard? The parts you would need a weed whacker for? When grass gets to a certain height/length, it tends to fall over and make wavy patterns with the wind.
 
2009-11-18 01:33:17 PM
fanbladesaresharp: The value of your home is only what the buyer is willing to pay for it. Until then it's just a number on a piece of paper.

Before I go into the number of ways in which post seems irrelevant, will you commit to a point for me?

Are you saying that my home doesn't have an actual value today, because it isn't currently for sale, and that therefore I should ignore whether a hillbilly neighbor makes the amount of money I would potentially be able to sell it for go down? Should I ignore said hillbilly the day I put it up for sale and get offers that are below what they would be w/o said neighbor?

If the best you've got is 'things don't have any value until the moment they are being traded' then that is just stupid.
 
2009-11-18 01:33:48 PM
ThematicDevice: A meadow is not poorly maintained.

It could be when it's in the middle of a planned development with established ordinances.
 
2009-11-18 01:35:07 PM
ThematicDevice: Nope, because the ruralish area I live in becomes more suburban every year. I live on the outskirts of a surburban town and in my area there are constantly new developments of people who think that the nature is scary and dangerous. People who move next to a farm because of its wonderful 'character' but get upset that the cows smell, or are convinced that the field the farmer leaves fallow for a year is going to kill their kids in their sleep.

Lol.

So let me get this straight: Folks in suburbia who don't want nature to take over shouldn't have that right, but you will complain about people buying up property where you live and changing it from what you like?

Maybe your collection of quaint farmers should have set up some ground rules to prevent this from happening?
 
2009-11-18 01:35:45 PM
GoldSpider: fanbladesaresharp: The value of your home is only what the buyer is willing to pay for it.

And people are willing to pay less for a property that is bordered by poorly-maintained lots. Derp.


Derp? Is that the term of the day? You kids these days......
 
2009-11-18 01:37:07 PM
ThematicDevice: You know what happens to a poorly maintained meadow? It becomes a forest. One year of not maintaining it and you might have three or four good sized saplings, three or four years and you'll likely have the beginnings of a new growth forest as the fast growers start setting up shop and those small sapplings likely dominate the area.

Are you farking kidding me? You don't think meadows existed prior to human interference and maintenance? The great plains were once a forest prime-evil, until the native americans began their deforestation right?

Wow, for a nature boy you don't know much, do ya.
 
2009-11-18 01:38:57 PM
Smackledorfer: fanbladesaresharp: The value of your home is only what the buyer is willing to pay for it. Until then it's just a number on a piece of paper.

Before I go into the number of ways in which post seems irrelevant, will you commit to a point for me?

Are you saying that my home doesn't have an actual value today, because it isn't currently for sale, and that therefore I should ignore whether a hillbilly neighbor makes the amount of money I would potentially be able to sell it for go down? Should I ignore said hillbilly the day I put it up for sale and get offers that are below what they would be w/o said neighbor?

If the best you've got is 'things don't have any value until the moment they are being traded' then that is just stupid.


No it's not stupid. It's a perceived value, or what the tax assesor or your realtor says it's worth. But it's not what I'm going to pay for it, as I'm the potential buyer. Nice lawn or not. Hillbillies excluded.
 
2009-11-18 01:43:14 PM
fanbladesaresharp: Hillbillies excluded.

In other words, factors external to the property itself are going to affect your perception of that property's value?
 
2009-11-18 01:43:31 PM
From this thread I have learned that balking at preposterously exorbitant fines is exactly equivalent to endorsing complete anarchy.
 
2009-11-18 01:43:33 PM
Smackledorfer: ThematicDevice: You know what happens to a poorly maintained meadow? It becomes a forest. One year of not maintaining it and you might have three or four good sized saplings, three or four years and you'll likely have the beginnings of a new growth forest as the fast growers start setting up shop and those small sapplings likely dominate the area.

Are you farking kidding me? You don't think meadows existed prior to human interference and maintenance? The great plains were once a forest prime-evil, until the native americans began their deforestation right?

Wow, for a nature boy you don't know much, do ya.


But, but, but, that completely conflicts with the Lord of The Rings history!
 
2009-11-18 01:43:51 PM
Smackledorfer: So you would be against allowing someone to buy property in a neighborhood and turn it into grasslands, but you draw the line at woodlands because that is what the wolves are interested in?

I'm suggesting that your fears of meadows are completely unfounded and irrational. Not that woods are bad.

I'm just trying to narrow down where you draw the line on things here.

Is a pig farm next door to you ok?


If it was one of the standard pig factories no, because they actually pollute and have poorly maintained leech ponds which during a flood will spill raw sewage into my property. You know, an actual health risk. If one of the farms near me decided to raise pigs in a similar condition to how they currently raise cattle, I'd have absolutely no objection.

Should those bear-attracting blueberry bushes be allowed? Yes, I am being silly, but so are you.

I've got a bunch of them actually. The bird population is sufficient that the one or two black bears in the area don't have a chance to get there first. I would encourage people to take actions to make sure their garbage does not become attractive to bears because that acclimates them to being around humans and that is in fact dangerous.

If you're wondering where I draw the line its where there is a legitimate risk which is actually quite different from the point at which people start panicking and running around because their child saw a single garter snake in their yard.
 
2009-11-18 01:44:43 PM
Before I go, I'll add that I agree on one thing with ThematicDevice: I prefer living further away from suburbia. I prefer having a larger property with plenty of trees (not a single row of 'privacy' vegetation, but actual thick forested area) between a neighbor and myself. I prefer living out there. Someday I will.

In the meantime, I respect the interests of those who prefer the opposite, and I'm not going to shiat all over my neighbors (not that I could if I wanted to, thanks to their foresight in having an HOA) by turning my yard into a dump, and I'm glad they don't shiat all over my home either.

There is room for both types of people, but if you are the nature type and can't figure out why you homes built within 10 feet of each other should be government by more rules than homes 4 acres from each other (or even just 50 feet between the homes and 25 feet between the house itself and the edge of the neighbor's property line), well, that is just stupid.

I'm not worried about a beehive in the country, but if my next door neighbor was a farking beekeeper had hives infesting his walls, that is a problem. I'm not worried about mice in the country, but a rat problem in the city is a major issue. I'm not worried about a bear in the country, but I don't want a den 10 feet from a swing set. Do ya see where I'm going with this ThematicDevice? You can't just take a handful of the properties in a development and let nature take its course without making a mess for everyone else there.
 
2009-11-18 01:46:13 PM
fanbladesaresharp: Smackledorfer: fanbladesaresharp: The value of your home is only what the buyer is willing to pay for it. Until then it's just a number on a piece of paper.

Before I go into the number of ways in which post seems irrelevant, will you commit to a point for me?

Are you saying that my home doesn't have an actual value today, because it isn't currently for sale, and that therefore I should ignore whether a hillbilly neighbor makes the amount of money I would potentially be able to sell it for go down? Should I ignore said hillbilly the day I put it up for sale and get offers that are below what they would be w/o said neighbor?

If the best you've got is 'things don't have any value until the moment they are being traded' then that is just stupid.

No it's not stupid. It's a perceived value, or what the tax assesor or your realtor says it's worth. But it's not what I'm going to pay for it, as I'm the potential buyer. Nice lawn or not. Hillbillies excluded.


Not so. A property has a value before it is offered for sale. That value is affected by many things. The value the tax assessor places on my land is not the true value of that property. If I have a home in a neighborhood that has gone seedy, but in every other way is equal to a home in a neighborhood that is well maintained, there is no way I can get the same price from a prospective buyer as that buyer will, more than likely, gravitate to the nicer of the neighborhoods.
 
2009-11-18 01:48:17 PM
fanbladesaresharp: No it's not stupid. It's a perceived value, or what the tax assesor or your realtor says it's worth. But it's not what I'm going to pay for it, as I'm the potential buyer. Nice lawn or not. Hillbillies excluded.

I don't see what that has to do with taking care of something you own and being interested in making sure it stays worth something. I don't like my car to get scratched up because I will sell it some day, and I'm interested in the ACTUAL amount of money I will get for it at that time.

Anything you can sell has value equal to what people will pay for it. Things don't suddenly gain dollar value at the moment of sale and then return to worthless afterwards.
 
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