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(Reality Carnival)   Yeah, yeah, we've all seen pretty fractal pictures befo... HOLY THIRD DIMENSION, BATMAN   (skytopia.com) divider line 122
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30234 clicks; posted to Geek » on 15 Nov 2009 at 11:21 AM (4 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2009-11-16 01:06:12 AM
HagarTheHorrible: Kind of a Gaudi meets Giger feel to them. Very cool stuff.

Huh. While I didn't perceive a mix, those were the two names I was reminded of as well.
 
2009-11-16 01:10:28 AM
It's one badass farking fractal.


obscure?
 
2009-11-16 01:44:05 AM
bikerific: It's one badass farking fractal.


obscure?


like a day-glow pterodactyl...

had that song stuck in my head since my friend sent me this link days before it showed up here.
 
2009-11-16 01:45:55 AM
semiotix: oldebayer: Having said that, the fractal thing is a pretty but unrealistic conceit in a universe that is quantized. At some point, there can be nothing smaller, so the idea that these patterns can be found in endlessly smaller sizes is incorrect. More interestingly, at the point WHERE they can get no smaller, everything on the larger scale must recapitulate that of the smallest possible formation. If this is true in our universe, as it seems to be with, say, clouds and nebulae, then what we can observe is, in fact, showing us the very basic structures of all things.

I don't have a dog in this fight, but I think the standard rebuttal is this:

As in "Pff, I guess your stupid physical universe is fine if you like blocky, grainy approximations of reality that take practically infinite memory and rendering time to look at even once. Hey, you like France? z(n+3) = z(n)e-2c. There you go, that's pretty much all there is to know about it. I saved you a trip."


I'm a big fan of XKCD, and I was always pretty amused at that strip. But something just occured to me - All the other iterations are pretty correct, but the physics-to-math step is not quite. For example, the chemistry-to-physics step, all the rules concerning chemical reactions and bonds and such are entirely subsets of the laws of physics. However, the laws of physics are NOT entirely a subset of the laws of mathematics. For example, consider e=mc^2 - It that were e=mc^3, the change would alter the fundamental laws that govern our universe (physics), but would not impact the laws of mathematics in any way. The laws of physics are most easily expressed using mathematics, but that's not the same as implying that physics is actually a SUBSET of mathematics.
Or maybe I just need another drink.

Either way.


/vodak!
 
2009-11-16 02:25:31 AM
defiancecp: For example, consider e=mc^2 - It that were e=mc^3, the change would alter the fundamental laws that govern our universe (physics), but would not impact the laws of mathematics in any way

Let me point out something in this regard before I pass out: the inverse-square law that governs the propagation of force (or at least gravity and electromagnetic force) from a point source, is a very obvious and simple consequence of our living in a three-dimensional space. Now note that e=mc2 looks a great deal like that inverse-square law, particularly if you make it m=e/c2,

My interpretation is that this is the way energy turns into matter: cram it into such a small space that it cannot get out of its own way, and voila: it "freezes," acquires inertia and, therefore, mass.

O fcopurse, as always, I could be wrong. ;~
 
2009-11-16 04:09:46 AM
nephlim: What a Fractal may look like

Wow, I'm in love.
Also great work subby!
 
2009-11-16 04:30:55 AM
Impressed with the complex math, but I'm guessing these guys' VCR's are still blinking 12:00.
 
2009-11-16 05:00:25 AM
Dude, you blew my mind...
 
2009-11-16 07:52:24 AM
Wow. But the phreaky part is how much a lot of those images resemble bone structures and other things found in nature.

/I suppose god is a mathematician after all.
 
2009-11-16 08:56:32 AM
Mandelbrot Set you're a Rorschach Test on fire
You're a day-glo pterodactyl
You're a heart-shaped box of springs and wire
You're one badass farking fractal
And you're just in time to save the day
Sweeping all our fears away
You can change the world in a tiny way
 
2009-11-16 09:11:51 AM
ykarie: Shortigo: jfarkinB: Shortigo: At risk of sounding trollish, I was doing this in POV-Ray in 1998

Yeah, and if you'd started rendering that at 4500x4500 with a reasonable number of iterations on your 1998 POV-Ray box, it would've been finishing up right about... now.

Pretty much -- if I recall correctly that image took around 20 hours to render on my new P2-333mhz and is something like only five iterations deep. No fancy shaders like ambient occlusion, and not nearly as interesting as this stuff.

Have you seen the stuff being done with it now days? And, since it is still mandatory for cool pictures on povray.binaries.images . . . source please?

And strange parallel, this site was linked on one of the POV-Ray newsgroups just a few days ago.


I haven't looked at POV-Ray or its community in at least five years now. There was some intimidating stuff being done back in the late 90s though -- I never did anything as epic as the monthly featured artwork.

I'd post my source if I still had it :/ Interested in QBasic graphics demos? I still have the source some of those I made :D
 
2009-11-16 09:38:43 AM
oldebayer: Winktologist: Every decade or two we discover smaller and smaller particles. First it was atoms, then protons and neutrons, then quarks. Something must make up those quarks.

Indeed. Here is a Link.

But at some point, we hit bottom, and there is no prying up the bottom and delving deeper.


emkajii: From what I understand, that has more to do with background (in)dependence. Quantum mechanics requires a fixed background of spacetime, while general relativity shows that one doesn't exist.

I don't think "background (in)dependence" means what you think it means. Though I could be wrong.


wow...thanks for that link. You just blew my mind for the rest of the day. Matter, including us, made out of nothing. This whole thing is just one giant, collective dream.
 
2009-11-16 10:32:15 AM
HypnozombieX: Wow. But the phreaky part is how much a lot of those images resemble bone structures and other things found in nature.

/I suppose god is a mathematician after all.


I'm not at all surprised that natural selection favors simple methods that produce complex structures. It's actually pretty obvious when you think about it.
 
2009-11-16 10:55:40 AM
Am I the only one who say some Lovecraftian old gods in those pics ?
 
2009-11-16 10:56:28 AM
Everywhere I see them there
I stop and stare at patterns
I don't care I must declare
I've got a flair for patterns.
In my hair the clothes I wear
my savoir faire is patterns

All I see is patterns,
the patterns that repeat.
 
2009-11-16 03:34:38 PM
I had a friend who hated math and said that it was ugly. I showed her some fractals to prove that math could be beautiful. She looked at them and then said, confidently, "This isn't math!"
 
2009-11-16 10:34:58 PM
WhyteRaven74: While in the physical world there is a smallest possible unit of space, the Planck length

Have you proven something that the rest of the physics world should know about?

/otherwise, FAIL
 
2009-11-17 12:33:39 AM
DFWPhotoGuy: I spent the weekend digging these guys out of a North Texas river. Baculites (straight shelled ammonites) have some of the coolest natural fractal patterns. Ammonite Sutures in general just really intrigue the hell out of me. Sorry im late to the fractal party btw!

Cool pics! Got any higher res versions posted anywhere?
 
2009-11-17 02:56:20 AM
GoshAwful: Impressed with the complex math, but I'm guessing these guys' VCR's are still blinking 12:00.

I bet they don't even own VCRs. Who owns a VCR?
 
2009-11-17 07:38:27 AM
ArthGuinness: Have you proven something that the rest of the physics world should know about?

I do hope you're not a physics major....
 
2009-11-17 09:33:26 AM
daddy-o: DFWPhotoGuy: I spent the weekend digging these guys out of a North Texas river. Baculites (straight shelled ammonites) have some of the coolest natural fractal patterns. Ammonite Sutures in general just really intrigue the hell out of me. Sorry im late to the fractal party btw!

Cool pics! Got any higher res versions posted anywhere?


Not yet, those are all actually hotlinks, i haven't done photos of mine yet. I need to do some prep work first.
 
2009-11-17 01:22:56 PM
The only thing I thought of when I saw those pics...

Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn
 
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