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(Daily Kos)   Swine flu vaccine finally comes in, gets distributed to high-risk individuals like pregnant women, infants and children and executives at Citigroup and Goldman Sachs   (dailykos.com) divider line 254
    More: Asinine, Goldman Sachs, Citizens for Responsibility, Ethics in Washington, Citigroup, Center for Disease Control, pregnancy, Melanie Sloan, Dr. Thomas Frieden  
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7990 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 Nov 2009 at 9:13 AM (4 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2009-11-06 10:34:14 AM
yakmans_dad: CygnusDarius: I wouldn't be surprised if the first version of the vaccine works horribly.

So, you're going to get it next year? That's the ticket.


Well, it's still treatable (to some extent), it's still preventable, and eventually I'll take the vaccine once they understand this disease better.
 
2009-11-06 10:34:48 AM
antoniojvr: "As the Milwaukee Health Department gears up for its first public swine flu clinic Friday, the beginning of what is expected to be the largest mass vaccination in decades, city officials and metro area health departments say they are facing a shortage of the vaccine."

/I may be a troll, but the gov really farked this up.


Much better to get your vaccine through the private sector. I bet that's where you got yours.
 
2009-11-06 10:34:49 AM
In fact, there are lots of smaller businesses where the employees are working 80 hours a week, under plenty of stress, and come in contact with lots of other people in the course of doing their jobs. Can those employees receive vaccines directly through their employers, and avoid the clinic hassle? Of course not. More crazy talk.
 
2009-11-06 10:35:09 AM
antoniojvr: "As the Milwaukee Health Department gears up for its first public swine flu clinic Friday, the beginning of what is expected to be the largest mass vaccination in decades, city officials and metro area health departments say they are facing a shortage of the vaccine."

/I may be a troll, but the gov really farked this up.


A picture is worth a 1000 words. Right on.
 
2009-11-06 10:37:02 AM
We should be glad they're getting the shot, everyone knows it causes Autism.
 
2009-11-06 10:38:54 AM
antoniojvr: /I may be a troll, but the gov really farked this up.

Yeah, it's the guberments job to protect people from the flu. And since they make the vaccine it should have been so simple.
 
2009-11-06 10:38:56 AM
GaryPDX: A picture is worth a 1000 words. Right on.

They may not be HONEST words, but who cares about that...
 
2009-11-06 10:39:18 AM
MDGeist: Could some one please explain to me why this H1N1 thing is such a big deal?

Here's the deal:

Every year, without fail migratory birds going over the arctic somehow catch a new version of the Flu. Now influenza viruses are pretty simple and can be more or less decribed by two Genes H and N so nearly every flu can be described as H(1-5) N(1-5). now if either the H or N # is one that's shown up in you or your paren't lifetime, then you already have partial immunity to that flu and your pre-existing anti-bodies can at least knock it down, if not totally wipe it out, while waiting for your body to make new antibodies specific this strain. (thus is last year's flu was H3N5 and this year's his H2N5 almost everyone would have partial immunity to it)

It just so happens that the genetic roulette wheel hasn't stopped on 1 in either the h side or the N side in living memory, (I think the Spanish Flu epidemic of 1917 which killed about 100 million worldwide, may have been the last time the H1N1 combo showed up)

So what this means is NOBODY has even partial immunity to the Swine flu, and that's bad. Flu is a very nasty virus that only seems like a wak one because of our partial immunities. So not only will H1n1 potentially spread quickly, but n the reverrse of what we usally understand about disease, it will make the young and healthy the sickest (we have the strongest immune systems therefore we will have the most powerful immunoresponse, which includes fever and congestion)
 
2009-11-06 10:40:30 AM
NightOwl2255:

Yeah, it's the guberments job to protect people from the flu. And since they make the vaccine it should have been so simple.


Interesting how they don't want big government, but want the benefits of big government...
 
2009-11-06 10:42:08 AM
Magorn: Flu is a very nasty virus that only seems like a wak one because of our partial immunities.

I was following you fine, then you went all rapper on us...
 
2009-11-06 10:42:27 AM
antoniojvr:

/I may be a troll, but the gov really farked this up.

How could they have done things differently?

A mass vaccination for something that has people all riled up like H1N1 was going to be clusterfark no matter what.
 
2009-11-06 10:42:36 AM
pugsleythegreat: DEUS-EX

This is all.


Heh, I was thinking the same thing when a couple of days ago, the Toronto Sun had a headline that said "Vaccine rationing" in big capital letters.

Of course, swine flu isn't quite the grey death, but hey, we'll take what we can get. Now all we need are some augmented soldiers and a romantic French resistance group!
 
2009-11-06 10:42:46 AM
Why do all of you that biatch at socialized medicine have a problem with this?
 
2009-11-06 10:43:07 AM
Yeah, I don't give a lot of weight to the opinion of a person who randomly intermingles upper and lower case letters.
biggovernment.com
 
2009-11-06 10:43:16 AM
antoniojvr: "As the Milwaukee Health Department gears up for its first public swine flu clinic Friday, the beginning of what is expected to be the largest mass vaccination in decades, city officials and metro area health departments say they are facing a shortage of the vaccine."
img: Teabagger with sign "Welcome to Government Health Care!" in front of a line of people.
/I may be a troll, but the gov really farked this up.


ZOMG! People had to wait in LINE!!!11! That's SOcialIST!
 
2009-11-06 10:43:24 AM
antoniojvr: "As the Milwaukee Health Department gears up for its first public swine flu clinic Friday, the beginning of what is expected to be the largest mass vaccination in decades, city officials and metro area health departments say they are facing a shortage of the vaccine."

/I may be a troll, but the gov really farked this up.


I know it's a very subtle distinction, but the pharmaceuticals companies pushing this fake vaccine for the disease their TV networks invented are not, technically, the government.

/I may be a troll, but the corporations really use the government to fark us up on a regular basis.
 
2009-11-06 10:43:43 AM
GaryPDX: antoniojvr: "As the Milwaukee Health Department gears up for its first public swine flu clinic Friday, the beginning of what is expected to be the largest mass vaccination in decades, city officials and metro area health departments say they are facing a shortage of the vaccine."

/I may be a troll, but the gov really farked this up.

A picture is worth a 1000 words. Right on.


One thousand words worth bullshiat, then?.
 
2009-11-06 10:44:12 AM
Ninja Wicked Quote 2009-11-06 09:19:28 AM
TheBitterest:
They'd be better off spending their money on bullet-proof.

I agree with you 100


You are both bank on the
 
2009-11-06 10:44:12 AM
Magorn: MDGeist: Could some one please explain to me why this H1N1 thing is such a big deal?

Here's the deal:

Every year, without fail migratory birds going over the arctic somehow catch a new version of the Flu. Now influenza viruses are pretty simple and can be more or less decribed by two Genes H and N so nearly every flu can be described as H(1-5) N(1-5). now if either the H or N # is one that's shown up in you or your paren't lifetime, then you already have partial immunity to that flu and your pre-existing anti-bodies can at least knock it down, if not totally wipe it out, while waiting for your body to make new antibodies specific this strain. (thus is last year's flu was H3N5 and this year's his H2N5 almost everyone would have partial immunity to it)

It just so happens that the genetic roulette wheel hasn't stopped on 1 in either the h side or the N side in living memory, (I think the Spanish Flu epidemic of 1917 which killed about 100 million worldwide, may have been the last time the H1N1 combo showed up)

So what this means is NOBODY has even partial immunity to the Swine flu, and that's bad. Flu is a very nasty virus that only seems like a wak one because of our partial immunities. So not only will H1n1 potentially spread quickly, but n the reverrse of what we usally understand about disease, it will make the young and healthy the sickest (we have the strongest immune systems therefore we will have the most powerful immunoresponse, which includes fever and congestion)


So, does all influenza move from birds to people initially? I didn't know that.
 
2009-11-06 10:45:34 AM
Lost Thought 00: Philip J. Fry: bighairyguy: Wow, I actually agree with those commie bastards at Daily Kos on something.

/4th sign of the apocalypse

These type of comments confuse me.

Kos is an open forum. You could go sign up right now and start writing your own diaries and change Kos to be whatever you feel like. And then "one of those commie bastards" could be a BullMoose party supporter or something. They don't seem to drop the banhammer there nearly as often as the right winger sites which do mass bannings for things like supporting Guiliani in the primary.

Except for the fact that they perma-ban any commenters/users who express an opinion anywhere short of far-left


Really? You must have a very interesting definition of "far left" I've been writing there off and on (mostly off these days) since about '05 should and if you search on my username (same as here) you'll see a whole lot of opinion and commentary that wouldn't meet anyone's idea of "far left"
 
2009-11-06 10:45:59 AM
NightOwl2255: Yeah, I don't give a lot of weight to the opinion of a person who randomly intermingles upper and lower case letters.

And appears to be wearing a letter jacket and tapered acid-washed jeans.
 
2009-11-06 10:46:17 AM
someonelse: So, does all influenza move from birds to people initially? I didn't know that.

Of course, that's why it's called the FLU.
 
2009-11-06 10:46:25 AM
As someone whose daughter woke up with a fever, nausea and a sore throat, I am NOT getting a kick out of some of these replies. We were going for the vaccine next week.

For awhile I was all, "This whole media blitz is BS!", but then our friend's son was in the hospital for over a week from secondary pneumonia from H1N1.

zena, I wish your son a speedy recovery.
 
2009-11-06 10:47:42 AM
foo monkey: MDGeist: Could some one please explain to me why this H1N1 thing is such a big deal?

If you're in a high-risk group, it's a big deal. If you're not, it's just a deal.


Im in one of the high risk groups and to me its just a deal
 
2009-11-06 10:48:29 AM
Hmm.

US Census Bureau: Current U.S. Population: 307,872,447
Daily Kos: "32.3 million doses are available, far less than the 159 million needed to cover those at the highest risk."

So, 51.6% of the U.S. population is "at the highest risk"? That's some fine reporting there, Markos.
 
2009-11-06 10:49:22 AM
IXI Jim IXI: Magorn: Flu is a very nasty virus that only seems like a wak one because of our partial immunities.

I was following you fine, then you went all rapper on us...


That should have been Weak, of course. How you all put up with my fat-fingered typing/minor dyslexia I'll never know...
 
2009-11-06 10:52:02 AM
ytterbium:

zena, I wish your son a speedy recovery.


I wish she speeds over to the Fair Lakes Hilton.
 
2009-11-06 10:53:29 AM
spmkk: Hmm.

US Census Bureau: Current U.S. Population: 307,872,447
Daily Kos: "32.3 million doses are available, far less than the 159 million needed to cover those at the highest risk."

So, 51.6% of the U.S. population is "at the highest risk"? That's some fine reporting there, Markos.


I thought that "high risk" category included healthcare workers, teachers, caregivers of children and other high-risk people, etc. That strategy is supposed to minimize the spread of H1N1, not just protect the actual high-risk people.
 
2009-11-06 10:53:45 AM
someonelse: NightOwl2255: Yeah, I don't give a lot of weight to the opinion of a person who randomly intermingles upper and lower case letters.

And appears to be wearing a letter jacket and tapered acid-washed jeans.


I remember when my brother and I tried to make acid-washed jeans in the washing machine. It was not pretty. Who knew Hydrochloric acid could do so much damage.
 
2009-11-06 10:57:13 AM
I have a vaccination against lead poisoning they should have, too.
 
2009-11-06 10:57:56 AM
Keep it up...

blog.nationmultimedia.com
 
2009-11-06 10:58:51 AM
someonelse: Magorn: MDGeist: Could some one please explain to me why this H1N1 thing is such a big deal?

Here's the deal:

Every year, without fail migratory birds going over the arctic somehow catch a new version of the Flu. Now influenza viruses are pretty simple and can be more or less decribed by two Genes H and N so nearly every flu can be described as H(1-5) N(1-5). now if either the H or N # is one that's shown up in you or your paren't lifetime, then you already have partial immunity to that flu and your pre-existing anti-bodies can at least knock it down, if not totally wipe it out, while waiting for your body to make new antibodies specific this strain. (thus is last year's flu was H3N5 and this year's his H2N5 almost everyone would have partial immunity to it)

It just so happens that the genetic roulette wheel hasn't stopped on 1 in either the h side or the N side in living memory, (I think the Spanish Flu epidemic of 1917 which killed about 100 million worldwide, may have been the last time the H1N1 combo showed up)

So what this means is NOBODY has even partial immunity to the Swine flu, and that's bad. Flu is a very nasty virus that only seems like a wak one because of our partial immunities. So not only will H1n1 potentially spread quickly, but n the reverrse of what we usally understand about disease, it will make the young and healthy the sickest (we have the strongest immune systems therefore we will have the most powerful immunoresponse, which includes fever and congestion)

So, does all influenza move from birds to people initially? I didn't know that.


Pretty much, and even more specifically it moves from wild migratory birds to domestic fowl, in one very specific region of China every year like clockwork. Whether it stays with the birds and then mutates into a form humans can get, or, as in this one, first mutates into something pigs can get and then into something people (and sometimes birds again) can get, seems to be pure luck of the mutation. However one or the other seems to always be the vector to people. Thus, every new flu starts in China and spreads outwards, which is why the world health groups have all kinds of monitoring protocols in hospitals and doctor's offices in that region, so they get an early warning of what "brand" of flu we'll get each year.
 
2009-11-06 10:59:03 AM
spmkk: Hmm.

US Census Bureau: Current U.S. Population: 307,872,447
Daily Kos: "32.3 million doses are available, far less than the 159 million needed to cover those at the highest risk."

So, 51.6% of the U.S. population is "at the highest risk"? That's some fine reporting there, Markos.


Very poor language skills and fact-finding there, commenter. 90% could be at the highest risk. Nothing wrong with that statement. And two doses, 4 weeks apart, are recommended for children under 10.
 
2009-11-06 11:00:52 AM
someonelse: Magorn: MDGeist: Could some one please explain to me why this H1N1 thing is such a big deal?

Here's the deal:

Every year, without fail migratory birds going over the arctic somehow catch a new version of the Flu. Now influenza viruses are pretty simple and can be more or less decribed by two Genes H and N so nearly every flu can be described as H(1-5) N(1-5). now if either the H or N # is one that's shown up in you or your paren't lifetime, then you already have partial immunity to that flu and your pre-existing anti-bodies can at least knock it down, if not totally wipe it out, while waiting for your body to make new antibodies specific this strain. (thus is last year's flu was H3N5 and this year's his H2N5 almost everyone would have partial immunity to it)

It just so happens that the genetic roulette wheel hasn't stopped on 1 in either the h side or the N side in living memory, (I think the Spanish Flu epidemic of 1917 which killed about 100 million worldwide, may have been the last time the H1N1 combo showed up)

So what this means is NOBODY has even partial immunity to the Swine flu, and that's bad. Flu is a very nasty virus that only seems like a wak one because of our partial immunities. So not only will H1n1 potentially spread quickly, but n the reverrse of what we usally understand about disease, it will make the young and healthy the sickest (we have the strongest immune systems therefore we will have the most powerful immunoresponse, which includes fever and congestion)

So, does all influenza move from birds to people initially? I didn't know that.


The chief reservoirs of flu are ducks, swine, and humans.
 
2009-11-06 11:01:50 AM
someonelse
"NightOwl2255: Yeah, I don't give a lot of weight to the opinion of a person who randomly intermingles upper and lower case letters.

And appears to be wearing a letter jacket and tapered acid-washed jeans."



Yes. You should never evaluate the content of the message, you should only judge the messenger.

If someone tells you the emperor isn't wearing any clothes, you should make sure they're dressed like you and their grammar is correct before looking to see if the emperor is naked.
 
2009-11-06 11:02:08 AM
NightOwl2255: Yeah, I don't give a lot of weight to the opinion of a person who randomly intermingles upper and lower case letters.

Don't you know that most great commenters on public policy do so because they lost three games of beer pong?
 
2009-11-06 11:02:27 AM
someonelse: I thought that "high risk" category included healthcare workers, teachers, caregivers of children and other high-risk people, etc.

Quothe the CDC
- Pregnant women
- People who live with or care for children younger than 6 months of age
- Healthcare and emergency medical services personnel
- Persons between the ages of 6 months and 24 years old
- People ages of 25 through 64 years of age who are at higher risk for 2009 H1N1 because of chronic health disorders or compromised immune systems.
 
2009-11-06 11:03:16 AM
MDGeist: Could some one please explain to me why this H1N1 thing is such a big deal?

736 hospitalizations and 19 deaths due to H1N1 in Washington state alone. That's the official tally - there may be far more cases, involving folks who can't or won't see a doctor.
 
2009-11-06 11:03:16 AM
Magorn:

Pretty much, and even more specifically it moves from wild migratory birds to domestic fowl, in one very specific region of China every year like clockwork. Whether it stays with the birds and then mutates into a form humans can get, or, as in this one, first mutates into something pigs can get and then into something people (and sometimes birds again) can get, seems to be pure luck of the mutation. However one or the other seems to always be the vector to people. Thus, every new flu starts in China and spreads outwards, which is why the world health groups have all kinds of monitoring protocols in hospitals and doctor's offices in that region, so they get an early warning of what "brand" of flu we'll get each year.


China out-sourced this model to the Mexican pigs.
 
2009-11-06 11:04:50 AM
My company is seeking the vaccine as well, I will be happy when they get it so I can has.
 
2009-11-06 11:07:02 AM
Well, I guess it's better than the aliens that turn you into a Scotsman (new window).
 
2009-11-06 11:10:49 AM
Bag of Hammers: Keep it up...

It is time!
 
2009-11-06 11:13:53 AM
spmkk: someonelse
"NightOwl2255: Yeah, I don't give a lot of weight to the opinion of a person who randomly intermingles upper and lower case letters.

And appears to be wearing a letter jacket and tapered acid-washed jeans."


Yes. You should never evaluate the content of the message, you should only judge the messenger.

If someone tells you the emperor isn't wearing any clothes, you should make sure they're dressed like you and their grammar is correct before looking to see if the emperor is naked.


Yeah, if a drooling, mouth-breathing water head tells me 2+2 equals the moon, I'm not going to pull out a calculator and start doing the math.
 
2009-11-06 11:14:12 AM
ytterbium: As someone whose daughter woke up with a fever, nausea and a sore throat, I am NOT getting a kick out of some of these replies. We were going for the vaccine next week.

For awhile I was all, "This whole media blitz is BS!", but then our friend's son was in the hospital for over a week from secondary pneumonia from H1N1.

zena, I wish your son a speedy recovery.


Thanks. I hope your daughter's case is mild if she does have H1N1.

foo monkey:I wish she speeds over to the Fair Lakes Hilton.

You really want to be exposed to H1N1? ; )
 
2009-11-06 11:14:50 AM
jaytkay
"90% could be at the highest risk. Nothing wrong with that statement."


Wow. Severe prioritization fail.

If you show up at work and your boss gives you a task list with 9 out of 10 items marked "PRIORITY 1", your boss is an idiot. You might very well go and do something in the wrong order -- kind of like giving vaccine doses to Wall St. execs instead of someone who's at higher risk -- because you haven't been given a clear view of what's actually important.
 
2009-11-06 11:18:57 AM
zena: ytterbium: As someone whose daughter woke up with a fever, nausea and a sore throat, I am NOT getting a kick out of some of these replies. We were going for the vaccine next week.

For awhile I was all, "This whole media blitz is BS!", but then our friend's son was in the hospital for over a week from secondary pneumonia from H1N1.

zena, I wish your son a speedy recovery.

Thanks. I hope your daughter's case is mild if she does have H1N1.

foo monkey:I wish she speeds over to the Fair Lakes Hilton.

You really want to be exposed to H1N1? ; )


Leave your kid in another room. We can rub each other down with Purell first.
 
2009-11-06 11:24:15 AM
Magorn: How you all put up with my fat-fingered typing/minor dyslexia I'll never know...

We just take our usual kind-hearted approach and make fun of you for it. :D
 
2009-11-06 11:25:06 AM
I'm technically in the "at high-risk" group being 22 and living on a college campus. But I'm also hale, hearty and young so I don't see a reason why I wouldn't bounce back from this if I caught it. If supplies are so low, I'd rather just skip it so a baby or a mom can get the vaccine.

I'm also not a moron and wash my hands after I touch public stuff, open doors with my elbows or my feet if I can, or cover my hands when I have to turn a handle. Maybe I look paranoid but I'm also one of the few kids I see around here NOT sniffling and NOT coughing.

/knock-on-wood
 
2009-11-06 11:34:36 AM
MDGeist:
Could some one please explain to me why this H1N1 thing is such a big deal?

The big deal (aside from the, at this point, remote possibility that it will become a 1918 super killer)

IS...

It makes folks who get very sick with it VERY sick. These are a small percentage, but a fairly consistent percentage. And only people over 60 have any resistance (apparently there was an unnoticed, mild, H1N1 in the 50's) so it CAN spread very fast.

So if 10 percent of the population gets it at the same time, the small percentage of those needing full hospitalization for a few weeks to survive will become many times more than we have hospital facilities or resources for.

And THAT's why its a big deal.
 
2009-11-06 11:35:49 AM
Someone say Riot?
artruch.files.wordpress.com
Oh....never mind
 
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