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(TC Palm)   Man finishes building all by himself a boat that's 52 feet long, 22 feet tall and weighs 40 tons. It's so big he can't get it out of the warehouse he built it in   (tcpalm.com) divider line 168
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22675 clicks; posted to Main » on 11 Aug 2009 at 11:29 AM (4 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2009-08-11 12:42:30 PM
Oh, it doesn't have sails. Let it rot.
 
2009-08-11 12:48:10 PM
notmtwain: Since it turns out the boat's not remotely stuck in the warehouse...

Yes it is. When your definition of "not remotely stuck" includes "he'll have to remove a warehouse wall"...it's stuck.
 
2009-08-11 12:55:16 PM
wolfzr2: BKITU: Control_this: What's a cubit?

xanadian: Riiight!!

My work here is already done.

Zwooba!


AM I ON CANDID CAMERA!??

/this is how you can tell which of us are the fogeys, you whippersnappers!
//off my lawn!!
 
2009-08-11 12:55:57 PM
Fuggin Bizzy 2009-08-11 12:48:10 PM

notmtwain: Since it turns out the boat's not remotely stuck in the warehouse...

Yes it is. When your definition of "not remotely stuck" includes "he'll have to remove a warehouse wall"...it's stuck.

/He'll have to unscrew a few pieces of sheet metal siding, no problem, no big deal.
 
2009-08-11 12:57:47 PM
sxacho: 18DeadMonkeys Radio: DaPinto: Really wouldn't tag this a florida, who else here could build something similar?

I built a canoe in my driveway. Does that count?

I built a canoe in my garage, but it was too unstable, so I built some plywood pontoons, but it was too hard to paddle with the extra drag, so I got a small motor, but the pontoons splashed water into the canoe, so I foamed, carved and gel-coated the pontoons into a sleeker shape with less drag, but it still splashed water, so I added a fin to the pontoons and it worked great, until the pontoons broke off. I need to fix that thing. It's awesome.


Pics plz.

/canoeing enthusiast
 
2009-08-11 12:58:38 PM
fappomatic:

Who cares? He has Maker's Mark in his basement. I wonder when he'll invite Pauley over for a good farking. That chick is teh hawt. I told my wife I'd leave her for Pauley Perrette given half the...oh this is about a boat some guy built in a warehouse?


don't worry, she'd probably leave you for Pauley too.
 
2009-08-11 12:59:33 PM
hnic17: Pics plz.

/canoeing enthusiast


Take a look at my above post for the beginning of the saga...

sxacho: First launch

I'll try to dig up some intermediate pics.
 
2009-08-11 01:04:34 PM
KingOfSwampCastle
wgb423: So, a guy builds something from professionally designed plans, takes 7 years or so to do it.... and you're impressed?

Unless he built it out of squirrel farts and rainbows, this is nothing new.

I bitter life you must lead.

Disappoint you I must, yoda. I grew up in a maritime community as the son of a boat builder.

....there is no bitterness in saying that building a boat from plans is not newsworthy.
 
2009-08-11 01:07:30 PM
I read that story when I was a kid, called "The Flying Machine".
 
2009-08-11 01:09:24 PM
hnic17: Pics plz.

i44.photobucket.com
The gross foaming over of the plywood pontoons


i44.photobucket.com
After some rough foam shaping

Then much later...
i44.photobucket.com
The final pontoon after a few iterations


i44.photobucket.com
Close-up of a fin
 
2009-08-11 01:13:28 PM
sxacho: 18DeadMonkeys Radio: DaPinto: Really wouldn't tag this a florida, who else here could build something similar?

I built a canoe in my driveway. Does that count?

I built a canoe in my garage, but it was too unstable, so I built some plywood pontoons, but it was too hard to paddle with the extra drag, so I got a small motor, but the pontoons splashed water into the canoe, so I foamed, carved and gel-coated the pontoons into a sleeker shape with less drag, but it still splashed water, so I added a fin to the pontoons and it worked great, until the pontoons broke off. I need to fix that thing. It's awesome.


I LOL'd. In a meeting. Thanks for that.
 
2009-08-11 01:16:53 PM
wolfzr2: BKITU: Control_this: What's a cubit?

xanadian: Riiight!!

My work here is already done.

Zwooba!


"Gotta take one of those hippos out and bring in another one..."
 
2009-08-11 01:17:55 PM
wpmulligan: It'll be capable of crossing the Atlantic Ocean.

Haven't people crossed the Atlantic in kayaks?


Hell, I've crossed it in an airplane. Didn't even get wet.

/got drunk tho
 
2009-08-11 01:19:17 PM
DaPinto: sxacho: ajgeek: I need an architect here.

You need an engineer. And yes, we can do anything.

Architects make pretty designs, Engineers tell you why that'd be a stupid thing to do.


You haven't worked with the right architects. Good architects know more about structural, electrical and mechanical design than any of those individual engineers know about architecture or any of those other disciplines.

/architect that can teach an engineer a thing or two.
 
2009-08-11 01:22:33 PM
sxacho: The gross foaming over of the plywood pontoons

For a second there, I thought you'd meant to post in the British food thread...
 
2009-08-11 01:26:35 PM
The Great Gazoo: DaPinto: sxacho: ajgeek: I need an architect here.

You need an engineer. And yes, we can do anything.

Architects make pretty designs, Engineers tell you why that'd be a stupid thing to do.

You haven't worked with the right architects. Good architects know more about structural, electrical and mechanical design than any of those individual engineers know about architecture or any of those other disciplines.

/architect that can teach an engineer a thing or two.


thank you!
 
2009-08-11 01:27:20 PM
Oh.... Warehouse.

Never mind.
 
2009-08-11 01:27:42 PM
The Great Gazoo: DaPinto: sxacho: ajgeek: I need an architect here.

You need an engineer. And yes, we can do anything.

Architects make pretty designs, Engineers tell you why that'd be a stupid thing to do.

You haven't worked with the right architects. Good architects know more about structural, electrical and mechanical design than any of those individual engineers know about architecture or any of those other disciplines.

/architect that can teach an engineer a thing or two.


I have obviously never met you in any professional capacity.
 
2009-08-11 01:30:31 PM
www.actorscolony.com
Am I actually the first one who thought of this?
 
2009-08-11 01:32:50 PM
VTCMart: What did the Engineering grad call the MBA grad?
Answer: Boss


Most common undergrad degree for a Fortune 100 CEO?? Engineering.
 
2009-08-11 01:40:01 PM
how long can you tread water?

/ha ha ha
 
2009-08-11 01:41:18 PM
The article says that it's going to take him 4-5 hours to get the boat out of the warehouse. Damn, he better start before noon if he wants to get out of there by happy hour. He's screwed.
 
2009-08-11 01:51:34 PM
sxacho: hnic17: Pics plz.


The gross foaming over of the plywood pontoons



After some rough foam shaping

Then much later...

The final pontoon after a few iterations



Close-up of a fin


Looks pretty awesome. I thought I saw that you made the canoe out of wood, is that right? What kind, if so? I'd like to build my own canoe one day with an outrigger pontoon so I can mount a sizable sail.
 
2009-08-11 01:56:25 PM
Beauxnick: Control_this: What's a cubit?

it's a unit of measurement to measure length


Woo Woo! The clue train left and you weren't on it!
 
2009-08-11 01:58:43 PM
Sybarite: How many cubits is that?

Ace.

Move along, nothing to see here.

/Noah, this is god...
 
2009-08-11 01:58:50 PM
"I need to sell some fireplaces," Devenport joked as he contemplated the prospect of a 3,000-gallon fill-up.

In Florida?

//Very disappointed in you Farkers
 
2009-08-11 02:00:29 PM
gr8fultom: I built an engine in my laundry room with no way to get it out after assembly through the 30" inside door.

but why did you build an engine in your laundry room???


For your answer, refer back to the part where I admitted my prior hick-ness. But the full answer is, the washer had flooded, ruining the flooring down to the plywood. As I stood in the plywood-floored room, I thought, "why not just build the engine here, rather than way outside in the shed". It was nice to be able to work on it anytime from the comfort of home. Quite a luxury really. Certainly made blueprinting easier.
 
2009-08-11 02:03:16 PM
Pair-o-Dice: gr8fultom: I built an engine in my laundry room with no way to get it out after assembly through the 30" inside door.

but why did you build an engine in your laundry room???

and why does your laundry room only have a 2'6" door?


two words: mobile home

/bought it in college rather than pay rent
//miss it dearly....except in the spring when the roof used to leak...
 
2009-08-11 02:08:56 PM
mandrsn1: VTCMart: What did the Engineering grad call the MBA grad?
Answer: Boss

Most common undergrad degree for a Fortune 100 CEO?? Engineering.


I guess that explains the economy the last few years.
 
2009-08-11 02:12:12 PM
Richard_The_Clown:
Am I actually the first one who thought of this?

Nice pic though. I kinda had an image of the Titanic.
 
2009-08-11 02:19:50 PM
This is just an expensive excuse for him to get away from his nagging wife every night and all weekend.

It's kinda sad. The guy obviously has some fear of sailing to have spent the last 16 years building a boat instead of actually sailing. And now he hopes to "eventually" make it to SA? The guy is no youth. 70 yo?

I predict he is never going to actually sail that vessel further than 15 NM off the coast of FL...if that.

Mission accomplished though that he didn't have to listen to the wife babble on at night.
 
2009-08-11 02:21:36 PM
Nice work, that is a sweet boat. Hopefully he won't die of a heart attack in a few days, never getting to enjoy it.
 
2009-08-11 02:34:46 PM
hnic17: sxacho: hnic17: Pics plz.


The gross foaming over of the plywood pontoons



After some rough foam shaping

Then much later...

The final pontoon after a few iterations



Close-up of a fin

Looks pretty awesome. I thought I saw that you made the canoe out of wood, is that right? What kind, if so? I'd like to build my own canoe one day with an outrigger pontoon so I can mount a sizable sail.


Thanks, it was a lot of fun to screw around with. I just used 1/4" hardwood plywood from Home Depot. I had intended to build it on the cheap. Little did I know that by the time I finally finished, I'd have upwards of $1000 and I don't know how many hours put into the damned thing.
 
2009-08-11 02:35:22 PM
I live in Vero Beach -- which has become a far too expensive town.

About 20 miles south is White City, below Ft. Pierce. Back in the 90s, as a courier, I used to see this guy building a cement boat behind his small, wooden house.

It was longer than the house. I caught him home one day and asked him about it and he said when it was finished, he wanted to sail for a living. 10 years later, he was still building the boat when I quit the job. It was bigger and longer than his house, complete with most of the superstructure. The entire hull was cement, which he applied and formed by hand.

Think commercial fishing trawler and you about have the size and style right.

About 5 years after I had quit, I was in the area and decided to pull on by and see if he had made more progress on the boat.

I guess he did. The house was empty and the boat gone.

About two an a half of the same sized boats as listed in the article could make up his monster. I can't even imagine the determination it took to mix up all of that cement and then work it into the wire and rebar frame by hand, day after day, making sure the hull had no flaws.

That never made the news.

Probably because he wasn't rich.

Actually, I hope his dream came through. After all of that work on the monster ship, I hope he managed to launch it and is sailing about the ocean. I only met him once and he was wearing a gray uniform, like a plumber or city worker, and the house was over 40 years old back then, of the old style wooden Florida type. Basically, a cottage.

I figure most of his salary went into equipping the ship.
 
2009-08-11 02:58:36 PM
Rik01: I live in Vero Beach -- which has become a far too expensive town.

About 20 miles south is White City, below Ft. Pierce. Back in the 90s, as a courier, I used to see this guy building a cement boat behind his small, wooden house.

It was longer than the house. I caught him home one day and asked him about it and he said when it was finished, he wanted to sail for a living. 10 years later, he was still building the boat when I quit the job. It was bigger and longer than his house, complete with most of the superstructure. The entire hull was cement, which he applied and formed by hand.

Think commercial fishing trawler and you about have the size and style right.

About 5 years after I had quit, I was in the area and decided to pull on by and see if he had made more progress on the boat.

I guess he did. The house was empty and the boat gone.

About two an a half of the same sized boats as listed in the article could make up his monster. I can't even imagine the determination it took to mix up all of that cement and then work it into the wire and rebar frame by hand, day after day, making sure the hull had no flaws.

That never made the news.

Probably because he wasn't rich.

Actually, I hope his dream came through. After all of that work on the monster ship, I hope he managed to launch it and is sailing about the ocean. I only met him once and he was wearing a gray uniform, like a plumber or city worker, and the house was over 40 years old back then, of the old style wooden Florida type. Basically, a cottage.

I figure most of his salary went into equipping the ship.


I admit I don't know much about boats but one made out of concrete seems like a bad idea
 
2009-08-11 03:04:24 PM
LandOfChocolate: I admit I don't know much about boats but one made out of concrete seems like a bad idea

Not really...concrete ships have been around since the mid-1800s. Displacement works the same way with wood, steel, and concrete.
 
2009-08-11 03:09:19 PM
LandOfChocolate: I admit I don't know much about boats but one made out of concrete seems like a bad idea

Nimitz class super aircraft carriers weigh over 100,000 TONS. They still float.
 
2009-08-11 03:11:18 PM
Rik01: I live in Vero Beach -- which has become a far too expensive town.

About 20 miles south is White City, below Ft. Pierce. Back in the 90s, as a courier, I used to see this guy building a cement boat behind his small, wooden house.

It was longer than the house. I caught him home one day and asked him about it and he said when it was finished, he wanted to sail for a living. 10 years later, he was still building the boat when I quit the job. It was bigger and longer than his house, complete with most of the superstructure. The entire hull was cement, which he applied and formed by hand.

Think commercial fishing trawler and you about have the size and style right.

About 5 years after I had quit, I was in the area and decided to pull on by and see if he had made more progress on the boat.

I guess he did. The house was empty and the boat gone.

About two an a half of the same sized boats as listed in the article could make up his monster. I can't even imagine the determination it took to mix up all of that cement and then work it into the wire and rebar frame by hand, day after day, making sure the hull had no flaws.

That never made the news.

Probably because he wasn't rich.

Actually, I hope his dream came through. After all of that work on the monster ship, I hope he managed to launch it and is sailing about the ocean. I only met him once and he was wearing a gray uniform, like a plumber or city worker, and the house was over 40 years old back then, of the old style wooden Florida type. Basically, a cottage.

I figure most of his salary went into equipping the ship.


No sh*t! I used to live on Robalo Drive...'the fingers'
 
2009-08-11 03:16:21 PM
sailorman_glh: LandOfChocolate: I admit I don't know much about boats but one made out of concrete seems like a bad idea

Not really...concrete ships have been around since the mid-1800s. Displacement works the same way with wood, steel, and concrete.


I've sailed on a concrete schooner. Extremely stable, comfortable ride.
 
2009-08-11 03:16:58 PM
Jim DiGriz: gr8fultom:So I googled the terms 'cubit' and 'riiight' to see what that was all about...

Google Bill Cosby and Noah's Ark. I'm at work so I can't see any of the videos to verify they work.


I got it right off, of course I am old fart, heard it on a 33 1/3 lp i think it was on his album "why is there air" or it might have been the other album I had, dont remember the name, maybe "fat albert".
 
2009-08-11 03:17:15 PM
ajgeek: LittleBlondeJug: I know of someone that bought a riding mower for their very large back yard. They couldn't get it through the gate. They ended up mowing their very small front yard with it, and using the push mower for the back.

Maybe I'm just an idiot, but why not install a larger gate? On that note: can't warehouses hold themselves up from three sides without a problem? And if not, can't the fourth wall be reinforced in such a way to get the boat out?

I need an architect here.


I can only speak to the warehouse bit. It is highly unlikely that the warehouse can stand, on its own, without all four walls present. The exterior walls are load bearing walls.

Having said that, with some bracing and careful study and one could very likely remove the wall or a portion large enough to remove the boat. It is just that without bracing or supporting the wall in some manner you're unlikely to get very good results after removing a single wall.

In the video clip and the text they mention just tearing out a wall. If that lackadaisical attitude is taken when he removes the wall I'd expect a follow-up article. From what I can see it is simple steel construction and my initial (entirely unwarranted but this is Fark - I've not actually been in said building) suggestion would be to consider welding some braces, drilling some holes, and anchoring chains over the building to the other side to give additional support during the process.

As a side note, I knew a WWII vet (fighter pilot in the early years of America's involvement in the war on the Pacific front) who built a replica of a WWII plane in his garage with the knowledge that it would never make it out of his garage in one piece. He has long since passed away. Fortunately, his son took the wings off the plane, extracted it from the garage, and spread his fathers ashes from the plane.
 
2009-08-11 03:22:29 PM
still looking to use some brother dave gardner references.
 
2009-08-11 03:24:12 PM
Pair-o-Dice: DaPinto: sxacho: ajgeek: I need an architect here.

You need an engineer. And yes, we can do anything.

Architects make pretty designs, Engineers tell you why that'd be a stupid thing to do.

Ahem!!! Architects have a personality. Engineers.....not so much


Hey, now, that's not fair. We have a personality, we just all share it. I get it on Tuesday.
 
2009-08-11 03:28:58 PM
talldarknstinky: Pair-o-Dice: DaPinto: sxacho: ajgeek: I need an architect here.

You need an engineer. And yes, we can do anything.

Architects make pretty designs, Engineers tell you why that'd be a stupid thing to do.

Ahem!!! Architects have a personality. Engineers.....not so much

Hey, now, that's not fair. We have a personality, we just all share it. I get it on Tuesday.


Today's your day!
 
2009-08-11 03:45:28 PM
God, that's a beauty.

/one day I'll build a boat.
 
2009-08-11 03:51:30 PM
Pair-o-Dice: I'm thinking you could be right. You know, those rooms require things like....umm... washers. and dryers. And it helps to have a 3'0" door for that stuff.

He spent all his money on the engine. This is all the washer and dryer he could afford:

www.dr1.com
 
2009-08-11 04:04:12 PM
sxacho: ajgeek: I need an architect here.

You need an engineer. And yes, we can do anything.


Dude, I'm nominating your boat for Product Design of the Year.
i44.photobucket.com
 
2009-08-11 04:15:27 PM
Control_this: sxacho: ajgeek: I need an architect here.

You need an engineer. And yes, we can do anything.

Dude, I'm nominating your boat for Product Design of the Year.


If it helps, her name is the Cormorant.
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2009-08-11 04:16:20 PM
talldarknstinky: Pair-o-Dice: DaPinto: sxacho: ajgeek: I need an architect here.

You need an engineer. And yes, we can do anything.

Architects make pretty designs, Engineers tell you why that'd be a stupid thing to do.

Ahem!!! Architects have a personality. Engineers.....not so much

Hey, now, that's not fair. We have a personality, we just all share it. I get it on Tuesday.



Well, that's the old joke, isn't it: "What do engineers use for birth control? Their personalities."

My engineer friends in the E/A firm I work in don't like that joke much. Or when I come in for Halloween dressed as a nerd from Revenge of the Nerds and tell them that I'm going as an engineer. Of course, it's probably not smart for me to do that since I'm one of 15 architects in a sea of about 200 engineers.
 
2009-08-11 04:35:57 PM
Years ago there was an article here on Fark where a guy in Fullerton spent his life savings and many years building a boat and then it sank on either his maiden voyage or within a month. Don't remember exactly and can't find a damn link.

For my senior project many years ago we built a smart house. It had a heater (parts from a hairdryer), an air conditioner (we just put chucks of dry ice in a vent), burglar alarms, motion detectors, etc, etc. I think there were about 7 different systems. It was really just to show how to hook all the systems up to a computer (remember - many years ago). We built it in the garage and when we took it to school we couldn't fit it in the door. We had to frantically cut it in 1/2 and then put it back together inside. That sucked since it had to be airtight to really show how the thermostat worked and we had to fix all the wiring once put back together. You also had to have it ready to show at exactly 11:00AM.

/Engineer
//Brother is an arcitect - and an idiot
 
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