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(Some Guy)   "Hey, remember how we threw you in jail 18 months ago because of a bloody palm print at your brother's murder scene? Well, it turns out we actually forgot to test it for blood. Sorry about that."   (dispatch.com) divider line 62
    More: Asinine  
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12808 clicks; posted to Main » on 07 Aug 2009 at 10:56 AM (4 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2009-08-07 08:41:16 AM
Oh, he is about to fall into a lot of money.
 
2009-08-07 08:44:41 AM
His mother said five men wearing masks and demanding money broke into the house, killing Dennis during a struggle.

Witnesses in court said his twin brother was at his girlfriend's home at the time.

O'Brien said in a written statement released yesterday that testing determined that the palm print did belong to Derris Lewis, but that it was not in blood and "must have been placed on the wall at some unknown time prior to the homicide."

When asked whether Derris Lewis could still be tried for murder if other evidence were found, O'Brien said yes, but that it is unlikely. "There was no evidence, other than the fingerprint, linking him to the crime," he said.


Hope the DA gets canned over that as well.
 
2009-08-07 09:00:08 AM
Schadenfreude ist die schoenste Freude: Hope the DA gets canned over that as well.

I think that EVERYBODY involved in this screw up should be canned.
 
2009-08-07 09:18:07 AM
Well, he is black... he has to be guilty of something....
 
2009-08-07 09:33:12 AM
Meh, it's only a year and a half of some poor person's life. No biggie!
 
2009-08-07 09:39:39 AM
"Until today, all references in police search warrants, reports and testimony referred to the palm print as a 'bloody palm print' or a 'palm print in blood.' The test (yesterday) established that the palm print was not in human blood," O'Brien said. "We've got no case without the palm print being in blood."

So was the palm print in ketchup or red paint to lead officers to link the print to blood?

/fire them all
 
2009-08-07 09:56:40 AM
real shaman: Well, he is black... he has to be guilty of something....

It seems like he's only guilty of being black, but that seems to be good enough for you, magic man.
 
2009-08-07 10:05:57 AM
Hi beerrun, welcome to Fark, the land of sarcasm.

/cue up the cop haters
 
2009-08-07 10:56:24 AM
How long can you be held before you're owed compensation of some kind when the case against you falls apart? What happened to presumed innocence and speedy trials? This is America, dammit!

Oh wait...this is America...
 
2009-08-07 10:59:05 AM
Things like this are why I don't support the death penalty.
 
2009-08-07 11:00:17 AM
While awful to be in jail for 18 months. He is probably going to sue and make more money than he would have working for the rest of his life.
 
2009-08-07 11:06:13 AM
Just think of all the crimes that were prevented by this boy being locked up..
 
2009-08-07 11:07:46 AM
I love you, Tackboard.
 
2009-08-07 11:09:57 AM
To lose your twin brother to murder and then be thrown in jail for it? I hope he hasn't come out of there a twisted person. Ugh. I just can't imagine the agony that entire family has been through. So sad.
 
2009-08-07 11:10:50 AM
Derris Lewis leaves the Franklin County jail after being greeted by his attorneys Shannon Leis and Adam Nemann.

img1.fark.net tag for Leis and Nemann. Not only did these guys free an innocent man, but they get 33% of the settlement for 0% of the anal rape.
 
2009-08-07 11:11:15 AM
FTFA

Sgt. Dana Norman of the Columbus police homicide squad said little about the case last night. He said the investigation into Lewis' death is active, and he defended his third-shift detectives.

"We've got a good squad," he said. "A very good squad."


This is the thing that really gets to me. It's human to err and all that but why the fark do morans like this always go on to say something like that?

Those imbeciles cost this man 18 months of his life and all he can say is "a very good squad"??

One would expect this excuse for man to at least have the decency not to comment. Fark.
 
2009-08-07 11:11:35 AM
sboyle1020: While awful to be in jail for 18 months. He is probably going to sue and make more money than he would have working for the rest of his life.

Probably not. Most states max out at $50K/year for wrongful imprisonment compensation. Unless he was battered by the cops, I doubt he is going to get much cash out of the situation.

This, in my opinion, is horse sh:t.
 
2009-08-07 11:12:56 AM
Anytime an innocent person gets charged, let alone convicted, the cops, the prosecutors and the judge should face the same sentence the accused was facing. Then maybe we would see efforts at actual justice instead of the somebody-must-pay mentality we have now.

Every cop, prosecutor and judge in this case should do at least 18 months in jail for this.
 
2009-08-07 11:15:07 AM
Police will conduct an internal review of the case, the statement says, "and will continue to investigate the murder of Dennis Lewis."

...after sitting on our asses for the last 18 months, convincing people that we must be correct because the lab techs that we slip cash to got us the results we asked for.
 
2009-08-07 11:15:17 AM
FTFA:
When the wall was sprayed with a chemical to enhance fingerprints, a palm print belonging to Derris Lewis was found in a different spot. Police assumed that to be in blood, but Huston said it should be tested because the spray also detects animal proteins, which could be left if, for example, Derris Lewis had touched the wall after eating a greasy hamburger.

Wait, so the "bloody" print had to be sprayed to be seen? As in, it wasn't actually red to the naked eye? Wow, did they ever fark this one up.
 
2009-08-07 11:18:12 AM
gshepnyc: Anytime an innocent person gets charged, let alone convicted, the cops, the prosecutors and the judge should face the same sentence the accused was facing. Then maybe we would see efforts at actual justice instead of the somebody-must-pay mentality we have now.

Every cop, prosecutor and judge in this case should do at least 18 months in jail for this.


Um, no. Definitely not the judge, as ideally he has little to no impact on each case. I would exempt the prosecutors on this one, as it's not their job to test things. If the police called it a bloody palm print then they assume that's correct.

The real problem in most cases, and this one, is money. If he had had more money he would have been able to have defense attorneys figure this out much faster.
 
2009-08-07 11:19:03 AM
A-Rth-Urp-Hil-Ipdenu: This is the thing that really gets to me. It's human to err and all that but why the fark do morans like this always go on to say something like that?

If I've learned anything from the Death Penalty threads, everything is cool because they let him out. A "we cool?" and a check for a few months rent and Jeebus is OK with it. No harm no foul.

There is no problem with the system, and we still trust it to put people in prison forever with weak evidence till they die a slow rotting death in a prison cell. We just can't trust the system enough to actually kill someone.


Big Cheese Make Hair Go Boom: Oh, he is about to fall into a lot of money.

I doubt it. The courts will argue that he was still tried by a jury, and found guilty based on the evidence presented. He was rightfully convicted, under due process, just a small mix-up on the evidence.

Wrongful imprisonment are pretty common. Huge payouts for wrongful imprisonment aren't.
 
hej
2009-08-07 11:20:55 AM
If it was a bloody print, why would you need to test it for blood? Seems pretty self evident.
 
2009-08-07 11:21:43 AM
The_Primal_Janitor: sboyle1020: While awful to be in jail for 18 months. He is probably going to sue and make more money than he would have working for the rest of his life.

Probably not. Most states max out at $50K/year for wrongful imprisonment compensation. Unless he was battered by the cops, I doubt he is going to get much cash out of the situation.

This, in my opinion, is horse sh:t.


But couldn't he file a suit in addition to the compensation?
 
2009-08-07 11:30:54 AM
sboyle1020: But couldn't he file a suit in addition to the compensation?

For what?
 
2009-08-07 11:32:00 AM
tricycleracer: Things like this are why I don't support stopped supporting the death penalty.

T,FTFM.
 
2009-08-07 11:32:48 AM
Meh. I say make the bastard pay for room and board. What does a room and 3 squares come out to over 18 months? Why should honest tax payers have to pay for this scum bag?
 
2009-08-07 11:33:34 AM
Farkeologist: Oh wait...this is America...

Right, if you want real respect and justice, go to Africa.

/happy for the mother who didn't end up losing both sons.
//now go find the real guilty party, "detectives".
 
2009-08-07 11:34:20 AM
the problem with the 'fire them all' response... is that it'll be even harder to turn over wrongful convictions than it currently is. In this story, for example, the prosecutor seems to have been convinced of the wrong, and once that step was made he became an advocate of the boy's freedom.

If he knew he had an impending firing... that's one less major helper in the release.
 
2009-08-07 11:38:31 AM
Big Cheese Make Hair Go Boom: Oh, he is about to fall into a lot of money.

You would be surprised. As I'm sure is addressed by some later people in this thread, often states cap the amount paid. On top of that, in a few states even if you are falsely imprisoned or falsely convicted, if you have ANY other convictions for anything, you aren't eligible for remuneration. Spend time on death row for a crime you didn't commit, but you were convicted of a marijuana offense when you were young? No money for you.
 
2009-08-07 11:39:18 AM
I would also like to +1 the brave hero officers involved who were not afraid to clean up the complexion of the neighborhood by providing temporary housing for the deadbeat.

I am sick and tired of all these libs who are miserably failing to see both sides of this issue.
 
2009-08-07 11:39:23 AM
Isolated incident. We never hear about all the good they do.

/Did NOT work in the China thread yesterday.
 
2009-08-07 11:42:22 AM
sboyle1020: The_Primal_Janitor: sboyle1020: While awful to be in jail for 18 months. He is probably going to sue and make more money than he would have working for the rest of his life.

Probably not. Most states max out at $50K/year for wrongful imprisonment compensation. Unless he was battered by the cops, I doubt he is going to get much cash out of the situation.

This, in my opinion, is horse sh:t.

But couldn't he file a suit in addition to the compensation?


For what? Against whom would he file? While it seems obvious after the fact, it would be hard to prove absolute negligence here. The police (and court) were presented with what looked like a good case. The defense lawyer ran out of money. The individual examiners all did their individual parts right. The problem was no one put it together. Whom would he sue? And for what?

Realistically, the best he can hope for is to sue everyone involved and gather settlements from their insurance companies. He's not realistically going to win a judgment in court.
 
2009-08-07 11:43:17 AM
The_Primal_Janitor: sboyle1020: But couldn't he file a suit in addition to the compensation?

For what?


Pain and suffering? I don't know much about "law", I was just wondering if it was possible to sue on top of the compensation. Kinda like a criminal and civi suit.
 
2009-08-07 11:44:30 AM
The_Primal_Janitor: sboyle1020: While awful to be in jail for 18 months. He is probably going to sue and make more money than he would have working for the rest of his life.

Probably not. Most states max out at $50K/year for wrongful imprisonment compensation. Unless he was battered by the cops, I doubt he is going to get much cash out of the situation.



What about a federal suit on top of it?
 
2009-08-07 11:44:55 AM
sboyle1020: While awful to be in jail for 18 months. He is probably going to sue and make more money than he would have working for the rest of his life.

And he would deserve it. Cases like this are where people actually SHOULD sue.
 
2009-08-07 11:45:31 AM
sboyle1020: The_Primal_Janitor: sboyle1020: But couldn't he file a suit in addition to the compensation?

For what?

Pain and suffering? I don't know much about "law", I was just wondering if it was possible to sue on top of the compensation. Kinda like a criminal and civi suit.


Certainly. It's possible to file suit in these cases. The problem is he's just flat out not likely to win. "Pain and suffering" caused by the actions of people who acted marginally appropriately is not going to bring a judgment. If that precedent were set, we could all sue any time we are unfortunate enough to have a surgery. :)
 
2009-08-07 11:47:01 AM
This is insane, and has prompted me to at least let them know exactly how I feel about it. Here is a link to Ohio Senator Sherrod Brown's CONTACT FORM. (new window)

Here is the link directly to the contact page of the Columbus Police Department, including Sgt. Dana Norman, who wants you to know they "have a very good squad." Columbus PD contact page. (new window)

Also, the direct address to this department is e-­mai­l­[nospam-﹫-backwards]ec­ilop­submuloc*or­g (Fark won't allow mailto tag)

People cannot let this department slink away and absolve themselves of responsibility. I'm not even a resident of Ohio, and neither are most of you, but anyone who feels angry over this ordeal should let this department know.
 
2009-08-07 11:49:38 AM
Emposter: sboyle1020: While awful to be in jail for 18 months. He is probably going to sue and make more money than he would have working for the rest of his life.

And he would deserve it. Cases like this are where people actually SHOULD sue.


I can't imagine how I would be if I had this happen. I truly don't understand people who come out after years of being unjustly imprisoned and seem unangry. I've been fortunate to talk to a few of them (through the Innocence Project), and they're just flat out better people than I am. If something like that happened to me, it would be wise that they keep me locked up forever, as there wouldn't be any "forgiveness" or "understanding" on my part.
 
2009-08-07 11:52:18 AM
Basically, most of this could have been avoided if his court appointed defense attorney would have been given more than $8400 for expenses. Note in the article that he ran out of money and was unable to hire more experts before the first trial.

But here's the part of these stories that always get me: Why in the hell aren't the ultra-conservative "law and order" types OUTRAGED by stories like this? After all, doesn't this really mean that a group of killers have basically gotten off scot free at this point after pulling off a murder?

BTW, that's some fine police work there Lou. Who would ever suspect that someone who lives in the home may have left a palm print on the wall of a siblings room at some point?
 
2009-08-07 12:00:20 PM
real shaman: Well, he is black... he has to be guilty of something....

They all look alike. Especially the dead guy and this dude
 
2009-08-07 12:01:40 PM
tricycleracer: Things like this are why I don't support the death penalty.

Damn straight.
 
2009-08-07 12:04:30 PM
beerrun: real shaman: Well, he is black... he has to be guilty of something....

It seems like he's only guilty of being black, but that seems to be good enough for you, magic man.


Every now and then someone quotes that asshat and reminds me why I put him on ignore... not that I need much reminding, I just forget he exists from time to time.
 
2009-08-07 12:07:26 PM
real shaman: Well, he is black... he has to be guilty of something....

For once, FOR ONCE, that is really why this happened. DA should pretty much hang, since that's what he wanted this man to do
 
2009-08-07 12:13:10 PM
Poor kid.
 
2009-08-07 12:22:18 PM
Majority0fOne: I would also like to +1 the brave hero officers involved who were not afraid to clean up the complexion of the neighborhood by providing temporary housing for the deadbeat.

I am sick and tired of all these libs who are miserably failing to see both sides of this issue.


Okay, I know you're just trolling, but don't go against things that are actually in TFA. He lived in the family home, with at least brother and mother. Deadbeat maybe, but then he was only 17.
 
2009-08-07 12:45:11 PM
Gunther: tricycleracer: Things like this are why I don't support the death penalty.

Damn straight.


QFT.

Around here there's a popular outrage and clamor to bring back the death penalty, courtesy of a twisted motherfarking piece of shiat who beat, raped and then threw a 5-year old girl into the sea... while still alive. It costs a lot to keep perspective (and of course, since the country signed an international treaty banning death penalty, it can't be brought back but the politicians are wringing all the publicity by yelling anyway) but the principle stands.

Why I don't support death penalty:
1.- No one has the right to take a life. Not even the state under controlled circumnstances.
2.- There's no rollback for the death penalty. Until we get an infallible justice process, we shouldn't be applying punishments that can't be reversed/compensated.
 
2009-08-07 12:47:39 PM
Poochner,
This what I call effective intervention. Getting the young man accusomed to his future environs. Like shop class in the olden days.
 
2009-08-07 12:51:36 PM
FitzShivering:

The police (and court) were presented with what looked like a good case. The defense lawyer ran out of money. The individual examiners all did their individual parts right. The problem was no one put it together. Whom would he sue? And for what?

Realistically, the best he can hope for is to sue everyone involved and gather settlements from their insurance companies. He's not realistically going to win a judgment in court.


Someone is at fault. Sounds like the prosecutor to me. He has a report that says "bloody hand print of victims brother found on wall". He has another report that says "Blood on wall was found to be victims". He does not have a report that says "Bloody hand print of victims brother, consisting of the victims blood, found on wall."
So the reports he does have amount to absolutely nothing when it comes to convicting the accused. He also has no picture of said hand print being present at the crime scene when it was initially investigated. Add this together with there being NO other evidence against the accused, and a lot of other evidence of the brothers innocence, and he should at least have asked someone to verify that the bloody hand print that was his ONLY piece of evidence and that conflicted with ALL other evidence available, did in fact consist of the victims blood. Personally, as a prosecutor, I would want that question answered in this kind of a case before I proceeded against the kid.
 
2009-08-07 12:51:50 PM
real shaman: Well, he is black... he has to be guilty of something....


Unfortunately, that's how cops and DAs think.
 
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