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(CBS News)   We have always been at war with Amazon. Amazon sued for Kindle deletion of Orwell   (cbsnews.com ) divider line
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7781 clicks; posted to Main » on 01 Aug 2009 at 12:22 PM (6 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2009-08-01 01:45:22 PM  

nickxero: Either way, this story is being turned into some post-Orwellian tardfest instead of what it should be: an interesting and informative look at intellectual property rights.


Actually, I think that cases like this must come before the courts, if only so that this legal vaporware of case law regarding intellectual property rights can get sorted out in accord with our present notions of property and sales, rather than in some manner that is influenced by big businesses.

Yes, I just said ; If the courts extend our common-sense notions of law to e-media, and establish it in case law, it will be better for everyone. Companies and people will know what the deal is, and it will be less disruptive than some twits on K street turning common sense on its head for the sake of their business models.
 
2009-08-01 01:45:24 PM  
WTF DOES BOLLIXED MEAN!!!?

/glad to see that moothemagiccow shares my outrage
 
2009-08-01 01:46:06 PM  

veryequiped: I find it more than coincidence that those books were removed.
Young minds seeing history repeat itself, exposing the elite, we can't have that!
I also couldn't help notice none of their elitist propaganda crap was touched
Just wake up already people


You haven't read 1984, have you?
 
2009-08-01 01:46:16 PM  

pugsleythegreat: outlawmoogle

I can't wait for the lawyers to win millions so the Kindle itself is in a .99 cent bin.

/would be neato
//won't happen.


I see what you did there. Aren't you clever.
 
2009-08-01 01:48:33 PM  
Im no conspiricy theorist in any sense of the term, but i find something slightly fishy with these Kindle problems. Someone should really look into this.

I love the comment on the article saying its the elite of america sensoring the books....give me a break! Lets not get all 451 on this.....
 
2009-08-01 01:49:08 PM  
outlawmoogle

yup! can I have a cookie now?
 
2009-08-01 01:52:35 PM  

pugsleythegreat: DblDad

That was pretty cool. thanks.


+1
 
2009-08-01 01:52:57 PM  

NutWrench: This is one of the reasons why you shouldn't buy a DRM-encumbered device that connects to the Internet.


This.

I generally avoid buying anything with DRM tech involved.
 
2009-08-01 01:55:07 PM  

Ghola Kwisatz Haderach: A large multinational corporate lawyer took my assigned reading based on copyright infringement.


What is funny, is 1984 is one of the books available online in many places.

I wanted to read it again about seven years ago, and I found a copy on a site dedicated to political treatises. I can't find it now but it also had a bunch of books by Marx and such.

A quick Google find that the book is available free on a site called "george-orwell.org". Hmm.

"But dagnabbit I need to read it on my fancy e-book de-vice, not some silly 'puter!"
 
2009-08-01 01:56:20 PM  
Oh for God's sake. Go to a used paperback store and pick up a copy. You won't be forwarding money to a publisher who makes money off of a book that should be in the public domain in the US by now.

It will probably cost less than what you paid to get it on your Kindle,

Amazon won't unceremoniously throw it down the Memory Hole,

You can lend it to others, and

You can probably sell or trade it back to the same bookstore if you want.
 
2009-08-01 01:58:27 PM  
veryequiped

I find it more than coincidence that those books were removed.
Young minds seeing history repeat itself, exposing the elite, we can't have that!
I also couldn't help notice none of their elitist propaganda crap was touched
Just wake up already people


You know THEY are watching you this very minute through your computer screen don't you? Watching you, noting every move you make and compiling a dossier. THEY are reading your thoughts through a microchip implanted in the base of your skull. THEY are the voices in your head, telling you to do things, whispering, always whispering. THEY know what you have done. Soon, THEY will be coming for you.

/or you could just take your lithium
 
2009-08-01 02:01:55 PM  
DJATP Quote 2009-08-01 01:48:33 PM
Im no conspiricy theorist in any sense of the term, but i find something slightly fishy with these Kindle problems. Someone should really look into this.

I love the comment on the article saying its the elite of america sensoring the books....give me a break! Lets not get all 451 on this.....


Look at the books they deleted: Animal Farm, 1984. All books that were about Communism and Big Government. An elitist moving America towards total government control wouldn't want people to read those books.

www.scifidrive.com


/Great Book
//Movie not as good as the book
 
2009-08-01 02:03:15 PM  

DJATP: Lets not get all 451 on this.....



The device.
Is called.
The "Kindle".

Do you know what kindling is?

It's something you burn.

I don't foam at the mouth enough to do a good conspiracy rant, but I trust someone else will take this and run with it.
 
2009-08-01 02:07:51 PM  

AfternoonDelight: Why doesn't he just go to the library and get the book?


It has probably already been checked out or stolen. Most good books end up that way, or, like books in my library back home, people liked to steal pages in the middle or the end to ruin them for everyone else.

/ever read Watchmen without the last chapter?
//yeah, that was annoying
 
2009-08-01 02:10:18 PM  
i'm sure it's been said, but all those dismissing or even disliking the idea of an e-reader sound an awful lot like people who had the same opinion about cell phones.

"a phone? i can put in my pocket? whatever!"

"a device which can hold several hundred books and fit in my purse/backpack? whatever!"

granted, i totally agree with everyone here who despises the DRM issues, but what is clumsy and poorly executed today will HOPEFULLY be much more streamlined and efficient in a couple years. lets not forget that the Kindle is essentially the first true e-reader, and it only came out last xmas!

paper books are awesome. i love them, but just like paper newspapers were awesome, their electronic counter-part are going to dominate due to cheaper cost, easier portability, and greater flexibility.

i get the impression that anyone bragging that they read books on their ipod or PDA or even net-book hasn't actually USED a kindle. the things are only a 1/3rd of an inch thick, and have an 8" screen - about the actual size of most paper-backs. and the fact that it's a dedicated reader means you can actually commit to reading instead of starting to read and then getting distracted by an IM.

/ i wish all artists/writers had websites that i could buy directly from, and make the cost = to what return they actually get from a normal sale.
// most of the problems with the kindle are due to it being a first of its kind. wait another year and things are going to be awesome!
/// 8" screen too small? the DX has almost twice that. and can be either landscape or ... 'upright' mode
 
2009-08-01 02:11:56 PM  
vertiaset:
You know THEY are watching you this very minute through your computer screen don't you? Watching you, noting every move you make and compiling a dossier. THEY are reading your thoughts through a microchip implanted in the base of your skull. THEY are the voices in your head, telling you to do things, whispering, always whispering. THEY know what you have done. Soon, THEY will be coming for you.

/or you could just take your lithium


An Internet connection is a two-way street and is something you need to keep in mind if you interact with companies that constantly mine information about you in order to sell you product. The Kindle keeps track of your purchases through an Internet connection, so it's not a big stretch to assume that it transmits information about your reading habits as well.

I have no doubt that the Kindle also collects information on how often you read particular books in your library and transmits that information to Amazon. This information WILL eventually make its way to 1) corporations so they can decide which targeted ads are most likely to work on you and 2) to political groups so they can decide how intelligent and thus how subversive you are. Imagine your reading habits ending up in the hands of your next employer. Or how about a government flunky using this information to question/judge your loyalty?
 
2009-08-01 02:12:53 PM  

lenfromak: I can imagine "Don't panic" printed in large, friendly letters on the Kindle.

imgs.xkcd.com
 
2009-08-01 02:15:02 PM  
Gordon Bennett's troll alt: That's the way the free market works, people. You don't always get what you want, you don't always get what is fair, but in theory you do have a choice.

Take it or revolt. Your choice.

So the free market embraces fascism?


While acknowledging the trolling, you might actually find that market capitalism doesn't much care for democracy--a take it or leave it attitude towards it at best. Useful when it serves its goals, but otherwise irrelevant.

Try a quick read of Benjamin Barber's "Jihad vs McWorld". The Atlantic article which led to the book available here for free: http://www.theatlantic.com/doc/199203/barber. No Kindle required.
 
2009-08-01 02:33:40 PM  

erveek: Oh for God's sake. Go to a used paperback store and pick up a copy. You won't be forwarding money to a publisher who makes money off of a book that should be in the public domain in the US by now.

It will probably cost less than what you paid to get it on your Kindle,

Amazon won't unceremoniously throw it down the Memory Hole,

You can lend it to others, and

You can probably sell or trade it back to the same bookstore if you want.


Is 1984 a public domain book now? Amazon has tons of public domain books for free on the Kindle store, I'm surprised it didn't have 1984 for free in the case. Or you could always just put the free PDF on your Kindle. Or get 1984 from a DRM-free source and put it on your Kindle.
 
2009-08-01 02:37:20 PM  

pugsleythegreat: So, could you load PDF's or .DOC's to it? or is it some wacky proprietary file type ?

Surrender the Kindle's mysteries to me!


It's a wacky proprietary file type. However, there are free tools to convert both to the Kindle format. You can also have Amazon do the conversion for 10 cents a file by sending the file to an email associated with your Kindle.

My personal experience with my Kindle 2 is that Amazon's automatic conversion isn't worth it unless you really don't have the time to convert it yourself. Word documents usually convert pretty well provided their layout isn't insanely complicated to begin with.

If you have a Kindle DX (the big one) then PDF support is built in. On the Kindle 2, the conversion essentially makes an image of each PDF page to be displayed on the Kindle (it has native jpg, gif, etc image support). While that is fine for text, larger PDF pages with images tend to look like garbage.

Lack of proper PDF support is the biggest failure of the Kindle 2 I've found, and I'm a little confused why Amazon doesn't let you purchase the plugin for the OS since they've already written it for the DX.

I's say as an e-book reader the Kindle 2 is about 75% there. I commute 3 hours each day by train, however, so I'm pretty much the target market. If you read a lot and travel a lot it's a farking godsend.

NutWrench: The Kindle keeps track of your purchases through an Internet connection, so it's not a big stretch to assume that it transmits information about your reading habits as well.


Everything is tied to your Amazon account. It doesn't keep any more information about you than Amazon already keeps about normal book purchases through them. To save battery life, it uses a "push-push" system, like blackberry, to sync content. If there is something new in your Amazon account, it initiates a session to push the new material down. If there is new material on your Kindle (the most common info is a bookmark) then it will push the data up.

This is all a moot point to most Kindle owners, since we leave the wireless off unless we are expecting a new delivery. It kills the battery. You also have the option of leaving the wireless off for good and using the Kindle just like the Sony e-reader: you purchase books through Amazon, download them to your computer, and then copy them to the device.
 
2009-08-01 02:38:31 PM  

outlawmoogle: Is 1984 a public domain book now?


Everywhere except the US, which has the most oppressive copyright laws in the world.

If you want a public domain copy of the book you have to go to Project Gutenberg web pages in other countries, like Australia.
 
2009-08-01 02:41:24 PM  

CowboyNinjaD: But yeah, having a legal ruling on the limitations of DRM would be nice.


It wouldn't make it that far. Amazon essentially sold a stolen product. The publisher who uploaded the book for sale didn't have the rights to sell it.

Not incidentally, Amazon does have legit copies of 1984 for sale in the Kindle store. They should have just replaced the illegal copy with one of the legit ones.
 
2009-08-01 02:44:52 PM  
In other news, Amazon pirates books.
 
2009-08-01 02:49:16 PM  

loonatic112358: kroonermanblack:
If I purchased a copy of 1984, it would never run out of battery life, or be removed from my possesion (unless of course the firemen were called).

and they will be, they'll find the books in your attic, and burn them, they will burn your house down, and send that hound after you if you try to run.

/couldn't find any quotes


Glad someone got it. Or thought it was witty enough to respond.
 
2009-08-01 02:52:46 PM  
Good. I hope this kid wins his lawsuit.
 
2009-08-01 02:55:29 PM  

leadmetal: Every class action lawsuit needs a lead plaintiff to start things out. Class action suits make lawyers rich and get the actually damaged a coupon. So, this kid likely has a family member or a friend of the family who is a lawyer, and he gets to be lead plaintiff to get the money machine rolling.

I wouldn't even be surprised if a lawyer trolled the local high school to find some kid he could pay with a couple grand to be a lead plaintiff for some class action suit.

Give a high school enough cash for a low end used car while pocketing millions in legal fees.


i18.photobucket.com
Class-action lawsuits do NOT work that way.
 
2009-08-01 03:03:39 PM  

belowner: CowboyNinjaD: But yeah, having a legal ruling on the limitations of DRM would be nice.

It wouldn't make it that far. Amazon essentially sold a stolen product. The publisher who uploaded the book for sale didn't have the rights to sell it.



That's not the issue. Regardless of whether they had the right to sell the e-books to begin with, did they have the right to remove the books from the kindles of customers who already bought it?

If you sell me a stolen TV, breaking into my house, taking it back and returning my money doesn't make it all right. Now you've just committed another crime.

Obviously Amazon didn't do anything as bad as physically breaking into someone's house, but let's look at the reverse of what Amazon did. Can kindle users make Amazon remove a book they don't like in exchange for a refund?

Similarly, can iTunes erase all the songs off your computer and give you your money back?

There are a lot of issues that need to be worked out. I hope they push this suit as far as they can and force a ruling.
 
2009-08-01 03:04:45 PM  
The real crux of the matter are copyright laws in the US. George Orwell is in the public domain in the rest of the world, but not in the US because Disney throws a lot of money at Congress to extend the copyright laws. It isn't right. According to the Constitution:

"To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries"

It is not 'limited Times' if you keep tacking on 25 years every time the expiration date comes around.
 
2009-08-01 03:17:01 PM  

kroonermanblack: loonatic112358: kroonermanblack:
If I purchased a copy of 1984, it would never run out of battery life, or be removed from my possesion (unless of course the firemen were called).

and they will be, they'll find the books in your attic, and burn them, they will burn your house down, and send that hound after you if you try to run.

/couldn't find any quotes

Glad someone got it. Or thought it was witty enough to respond.


if i was at the house, i'd have found the a quote from when montag burned down the house of some lady

the similarities these days are a tad too much
 
2009-08-01 03:19:07 PM  

CowboyNinjaD: belowner: CowboyNinjaD: But yeah, having a legal ruling on the limitations of DRM would be nice.

It wouldn't make it that far. Amazon essentially sold a stolen product. The publisher who uploaded the book for sale didn't have the rights to sell it.


That's not the issue. Regardless of whether they had the right to sell the e-books to begin with, did they have the right to remove the books from the kindles of customers who already bought it?

If you sell me a stolen TV, breaking into my house, taking it back and returning my money doesn't make it all right. Now you've just committed another crime.

Obviously Amazon didn't do anything as bad as physically breaking into someone's house, but let's look at the reverse of what Amazon did. Can kindle users make Amazon remove a book they don't like in exchange for a refund?

Similarly, can iTunes erase all the songs off your computer and give you your money back?

There are a lot of issues that need to be worked out. I hope they push this suit as far as they can and force a ruling.


what amazon should have done is notified the customers, worked out a deal with the copyright holders and updated the on kindle version to the correct version per the kindle owners agreement, not removed the content of the kindle without warning.
 
2009-08-01 03:19:19 PM  

Mister Peejay: DJATP: Lets not get all 451 on this.....


The device.
Is called.
The "Kindle".

Do you know what kindling is?

It's something you burn.


lol, i guess Amazon went all 451 without even noticing...Possibly....consipircy theory time...
 
2009-08-01 03:24:42 PM  
loonatic112358

what amazon should have done is notified the customers, worked out a deal with the copyright holders and updated the on kindle version to the correct version per the kindle owners agreement, not removed the content of the kindle without warning.


Ok citizen, you were warned, now turn in your Fark card and report to the reeducation camp. This kind of reasonable, logical post will not be tolerated.
 
2009-08-01 03:29:44 PM  

vertiaset: loonatic112358

what amazon should have done is notified the customers, worked out a deal with the copyright holders and updated the on kindle version to the correct version per the kindle owners agreement, not removed the content of the kindle without warning.

Ok citizen, you were warned, now turn in your Fark card and report to the reeducation camp. This kind of reasonable, logical post will not be tolerated.


sorry, i forgot to not take my meds today
 
2009-08-01 03:31:38 PM  

CowboyNinjaD: Regardless of whether they had the right to sell the e-books to begin with, did they have the right to remove the books from the kindles of customers who already bought it?


Did Amazon? Not sure. However, I'm certain you don't keep to keep a stolen truck even if you pay someone for it.

They probably should have had some authority office issue a letter letting people know they were in possession of illegally sold property and they had to return it.

As to whether Amazon reserved the right to do it automatically - I haven't read the fine print on my Kindle Agreement. I'll see if I can find it and get back to you.

CowboyNinjaD: Similarly, can iTunes erase all the songs off your computer and give you your money back?


Not sure. I do know that they remove songs from the store if a copyright objection comes up. I haven't heard of a case where they sold songs without permission first, which was the case here.
 
2009-08-01 03:39:17 PM  

CowboyNinjaD: Can kindle users make Amazon remove a book they don't like in exchange for a refund?


Yeah, but there's a time limit on it. They offer the first chapters of books as a preview, but I've made a few returns after purchasing by mistake. They delete the book and credit your account.

CowboyNinjaD: did they have the right to remove the books from the kindles of customers who already bought it?


LAWDY BE! Ask and you shall receive! From my Kindle service agreement (I've bolded where Amazon is likely to get into trouble):

Use of Digital Content. Upon your payment of the applicable fees set by Amazon, Amazon grants you the non-exclusive right to keep a permanent copy of the applicable Digital Content and to view, use, and display such Digital Content an unlimited number of times, solely on the Device or as authorized by Amazon as part of the Service and solely for your personal, non-commercial use. Digital Content will be deemed licensed to you by Amazon under this Agreement unless otherwise expressly provided by Amazon.

So no, I don't think they reserved the right to up and delete content. Should make for a nice court case if the judge doesn't stop the argument at the illegal sale.
 
2009-08-01 03:41:15 PM  

CowboyNinjaD: Can kindle users make Amazon remove a book they don't like in exchange for a refund?


Sorry for the lack of specifics. They have a 7 day return policy.

Good to know, since I'm a fast reader.
 
2009-08-01 03:42:20 PM  
Owning a book on a Kindle = Not owning a book.
 
2009-08-01 04:02:21 PM  

trifoldhat: I was actually going to buy a Kindle for my wife. She loves ebooks, but hates lugging around her ancient laptop. But, now that I know the company that sells them thinks it o.k. to rummage through them after we buy them, there is no way in hell I'm getting one.


this
 
2009-08-01 04:11:32 PM  
I suspect this will not go orwell with paying customers
 
2009-08-01 04:13:10 PM  
A coworker of mine who had just come from the US showed me his Kindle a few months ago while I was in Dubai. It was real snappy, so I resolved to get one next time I visited the states...

...until I read up on it. No connection to your PC. It's strictly wireless and everything that goes into it must pass through Amazon's server. You have no control over when it phones home, nor does it even notify you. Amazon is totally free to manipulate, modify and monitor everything you do with that thing. Talk about Orwellian.

I got the Sony PRS instead. Much better deal.
 
2009-08-01 04:28:19 PM  

jso2897: Class-action lawsuits do NOT work that way.


Um... all have a lead plaintiff(s).

And where there's millions to be made don't think for a moment there aren't lawyers willing to pay off people to make it for themselves.

Do you really think some 17 year old has the cash to pay a lawyer to push a case about an Ebook and the kid's notes? LOL. The lawyer is looking for a pay day one way or another.
 
2009-08-01 04:30:11 PM  

ShannonKW: ...until I read up on it. No connection to your PC. It's strictly wireless and everything that goes into it must pass through Amazon's server. You have no control over when it phones home, nor does it even notify you.


You didn't read very much. Every single thing you just mentioned is flat out wrong. Every. Single. Thing.

It plugs into your computer via a USB cable. Looks like an external hard drive. Books you purchase can be sent directly to the device or downloaded from Amazon's web site first, then copied over via USB. All of your Kindle content can be backed up to however many computers you wish. There is no restriction on the number of copies you can make.

The DRM Amazon includes ties content purchased from Amazon to your device. If you get content elsewhere, that is not subject to restrictions.

You can copy your own content on to it without having to go through Amazon at all if you don't wish to. Mobipocket makes a free conversion tool that will format your documents for the Kindle. Copy over via USB, just like you do with your Sony.

You can turn the wireless off (most people do so to save on battery life). It doesn't phone home at any interval - it's push/push. If there is new data on Amazon's servers then it sends the data out, if there is new data on your Kindle, then it sends data out. Every time it connects there's a notification at the top of the device that it is talking to Amazon's servers. If you are paranoid about it, turn the wireless off.

It has the same screen as the Sony readers. Turn the wireless off, and you have a farking Sony reader.

If you're going to knock the device, don't farking lie about it. Jesus.
 
2009-08-01 05:10:41 PM  

belowner: CowboyNinjaD: Can kindle users make Amazon remove a book they don't like in exchange for a refund?

Sorry for the lack of specifics. They have a 7 day return policy.

Good to know, since I'm a fast reader.



I know the answers to most of my questions aren't exactly clear cut, but that's sort of my point. Technology over the past decade has created a shiatstorm for copyright law. A lot of things are up in the air, and the courts and lawmakers haven't really been able to get out in front of the issue.

Publishers put a lot of shiat in their Terms of Use agreements, but it's not even clear if they have a legal right to do that. Then again, maybe they do.

We're dealing with intellectual property, and I strongly believe that artists, writers, photographers, filmmakers, etc. have a right to profit from their work. But someone needs to figure out how to make sure artists are paid for their work, while consumers are given fair access to the media they pay for.

There probably isn't a simple answer that will make everyone happy, but right now, there isn't really any answer. The RIAA, the MPAA and now book publishers are just going whatever they feel like, while disgruntled consumers strip the DRM and/or pirate stuff, in some cases just out of spite.

I'm not sure what point I'm trying to make. It's just all farked up.
 
2009-08-01 05:21:28 PM  

I'm an excellent driver: "Amazon.com had no more right to hack into people's Kindles than its customers have the right to hack into Amazon's bank account to recover a mistaken overpayment," Edelson said.

The lawyer has his anus cross-wired with his mouth. You don't buy a book with a Kindle, you buy licensed access which is owned by Amazon. If Amazon don't remove pirate software they get hammered, all they are doing is protecting the intellectual copyright. Instead of throwing all that small print in the trash you might want to read it some day...


Can you explain why Amazon has the right to access someone's Kindle and delete a file? Do you have this supposed fine print in front of you granting this power? Does it give Amazon the right to access a piece of hardware not owned by them? How would this work under first-sale doctrine?

Yeah, Amazon screwed up and needed to take action. That action normally would be discussing reparations with the rightful publisher while suing the lying publisher to recoup losses. It's what would happen if you sold unlicensed paper books. Instead, Amazon decided to access Kindles and delete files. It's an unwanted access of a computer system. That's not hacking how?
 
2009-08-01 05:29:31 PM  
Sounds like some kid just wanted to get out of an assignment. Suck it up, biatch.
 
2009-08-01 05:45:42 PM  

Mister Peejay: Do you know what kindling is?


Yeah, it's an old-school Kindle.

froghunters.org
 
2009-08-01 06:05:29 PM  
Bollixed? Bollocks!
 
2009-08-01 06:07:05 PM  

I'm an excellent driver: You don't buy a book with a Kindle, you buy licensed access which is owned by Amazon.


From Amazon (obtained by clicking 'How to Buy':
"1-Click to order your Kindle Edition. Your purchase will be sent automatically and wirelessly to the Kindle via Amazon Whispernet. No cables, no computer. If you send your purchase to an iPhone or iPod touch, it will be available in your Kindle for iPhone application."

Not one mention of license.
 
2009-08-01 06:16:50 PM  

nmathew01: Can you explain why Amazon has the right to access someone's Kindle and delete a file? Do you have this supposed fine print in front of you granting this power? Does it give Amazon the right to access a piece of hardware not owned by them? How would this work under first-sale doctrine?


Actually, I thought the hardware was owned by Amazon, you just purchased a 'license' to use the hardware, or whatever drivel. Similar to how you can 'buy' Windows but be locked out of using your license because some hacker distro'ed it to a million other people.

evilRhino: I'm an excellent driver: You don't buy a book with a Kindle, you buy licensed access which is owned by Amazon.

From Amazon (obtained by clicking 'How to Buy':
"1-Click to order your Kindle Edition. Your purchase will be sent automatically and wirelessly to the Kindle via Amazon Whispernet. No cables, no computer. If you send your purchase to an iPhone or iPod touch, it will be available in your Kindle for iPhone application."

Not one mention of license.


Not one mention of ownership either, if you're going to get all semantics happy. They say 'purchase' an awful lot, which can be repurposed to mean 'permant yet temporary rental with no renewal or subscription fee'.

/see previous posts
//No longer purchasing from amazon
///Rather steal it, at least I can KEEP it that way
 
2009-08-01 06:34:07 PM  
I am disappointed that none of you pseudointellectuals recognize the landmark significance of this case.

www.craig-thear.com

Let me paint it to you in terms you'll understand:

1. 3D Realms finally finishes Doom Nuke'Em Forever and releases it. Despite their best efforts, a shortfall of supply is expected.
2. You wait in line all night, buy yourself a copy for $40, and an extra copy to auction off.
3. Joe, some out-of-luck Duke fan (and not a plumber) bids $100 and buys your extra copy. $60 profit!
4. All is good, for months and months of remote-pipebombing holodukes and somesuch.
5. One day, months later, ID Software buys 3D Realms. They decide to deactivate everybody's copy and issue a refund. Even though they have no specific right to do so.
6. Everyone's copy goes dead, including yours.
7. You search desperately for hacks on the internet. But they're just not the same. Just some 3GL emulation, done badly with no antialiasing.
8. Meanwhile, at Joe's house: Joe is playing Duke Nuke'Em without pants on. He is in the middle of taking steroids so he can tip the strippers twice as fast. Suddenly his copy goes dead too.
9. Joe is not happy.
10. Joe IM's you and demands his $100 back, but you already spent the $60 profit on weed. And you just spent all your savings on laundry detergent. So you just :) and LOL.
11. Joe collects his secret society of internet tough guys. They break into your home and kill you.

Now do you see why this lawsuit is important?
 
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  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

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