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(Local6)   Students are still expected to *gasp* STAND during the Pledge of Allegiance   (clickorlando.com) divider line 389
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8199 clicks; posted to Main » on 15 Apr 2009 at 2:20 PM (5 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2009-04-15 04:54:22 PM  
America needs every child to pledge to her every day, she's that insecure.

What a patriotic notion.
 
2009-04-15 04:55:32 PM  
make me a sammich: grubchub: GOOD!! They should stand during the pledge. If somebody dosnt want to say "under god", then dont say that part, but if you live in this country and go to school here, you should say the pledge. I had to when I went to school, and never thought twice about it. Now a very small percentage of people have a problem with it, and we as a majority have to go along with them so their feelings dont get hurt. BULL shiat!!! fark THEM!!
Stand the fark up or sit the fark down on the immigration bus so it can drive your ass out of here!!

You're right!! Just because "it's how you used to do it" and "it's always been this way" people should go along with it.

I suppose you're still of the opinion of "lets put them at the back of the bus"... cause thats how it was done in your day?


The part that kills me is "Now a very small percentage of people have a problem with it, and we as a majority have to go along with them so their feelings dont get hurt.", as if anyone's told them they can no longer stand at attention or something.
 
2009-04-15 04:56:13 PM  
People just have too much sand in their vagina.

"Ah, my precious little snowflake is being taught things that are too influential on his fragile little mind," says the Wiccan mother and coked-out father who both frequently cross borders with a trunk full of fruit...
 
2009-04-15 04:57:10 PM  
I might buy to the protest angle but am more inclined to think that its just lazy kids making an excuse not to have to stand up. Even then its about showing some respect and courtesy. I don't share religous beliefs as my in-laws when they pray before meal but I don't go on a diatribe of why I think their beliefs are messed up. Any kid that is for this should have give an verbal explanation why to their principal. "Because I don't want to" is not a valid reason.

There is a fine line between protest and douchebaggery.
 
2009-04-15 05:03:30 PM  
The pledge of allegiance has always been the strangest of American customs to me; I think just because I've never had anything like it save the Lord's Prayer which frightened me as a kid.
Proof that you're always going to have problems understanding different cultures, no matter who you are.

/britfag
//doesn't say she loves her country every morning
 
2009-04-15 05:05:35 PM  
Talon: Children should not be forced to pledge to the flag in any capacity, including being forced to stand (and thereby acknowledge the flag and the pledge). Forcing children to partake in the pledge in any capacity goes against religious freedom: first for those who consider the whole ritual on par with breaking the whole
'worship no god but me' thing (such as Jehova's witnesses), and second for those children whose parents do not want them participating in what essentially amounts to a declaration of belief in the Judeo-Christian God and belief in his personal interaction in the wellbeing of America.



When I was a kid (long ago and, as it turns out, far away) we had to stand, but we did NOT have to pledge.

Now, I doubt that I'm alone in thinking the groups you mention here are a danger to society and should be locked up for their own protection as well as ours. They're crazy stupid and that's a bad combination my friend.

So, assuming that we get these people to safety, is there another reason why people shouldn't have to stand that *isn't* psychotic and retarded?
 
2009-04-15 05:05:42 PM  
sattizahn: People just have too much sand in their vagina.

"Ah, my precious little snowflake is being taught things that are too influential on his fragile little mind," says the Wiccan mother and coked-out father who both frequently cross borders with a trunk full of fruit...


You sound like you had a fun childhood
 
2009-04-15 05:06:39 PM  
piaddic120: sattizahn: People just have too much sand in their vagina.

"Ah, my precious little snowflake is being taught things that are too influential on his fragile little mind," says the Wiccan mother and coked-out father who both frequently cross borders with a trunk full of fruit...

You sound like you had a fun childhood


Haha

/raised by 2 catholics...
 
2009-04-15 05:06:42 PM  
Diogenes: Talon: Diogenes:

I don't think the theological connection is as strong as you do. The flag represents the Republic. "Under god" is merely descriptive. Incorrect? Who can say? But it just doesn't bother me. I'm comfortable with regarding "god" as simply a concept.


So you would be perfectly 100% comfortable with saying "One Nation under Goddess," right? Hey, Goddess is just a concept. It doesn't name any particular goddess, so obviously it doesn't leave anyone out, right? Newsflash: "God" is the name given to the Judeo-Christian god. Other religions NAME their gods. With real names. They don't just call them "God" as if they have a monopoly on the word. Which means that by saying under GOD rather than under "a god," or "under some form of deity," it refers only to the Judeo-Christian god, and no other.
 
2009-04-15 05:07:05 PM  
Thenewone: solokumba: olapbill: solokumba: /there have been many times i've flown glory this way
//waiting for the onslaught of trolls, neocons and freepers
///i will farking own you on a discussion of the flag so you better be ready
////or i'll just ignore you like usual

you sound short

You mean I type short.

Fine then, you type smelly


blog.wired.com

/dude, upgrade already
 
2009-04-15 05:07:21 PM  
Radworld4: I might buy to the protest angle but am more inclined to think that its just lazy kids making an excuse not to have to stand up. Even then its about showing some respect and courtesy. I don't share religous beliefs as my in-laws when they pray before meal but I don't go on a diatribe of why I think their beliefs are messed up. Any kid that is for this should have give an verbal explanation why to their principal. "Because I don't want to" is not a valid reason.

There is a fine line between protest and douchebaggery.



"Because i dont want to" is a good enough answer for an American. I will never salute or pledge the flag unless i have decided, or have been called to, bear arms for its defense. Its bars are colored with the blood of my brethren, and to a man they would all call the Pledge the unpatriotic pile of european tyrannical crap that it actually is. This includes the 10 who fought at the first battle the flag was flown (Cooch's Bridge), a later general who standardized New Jersey's battleflag design, and an even later commodore who served on Shaef during the invasion of Normandy (not to mention the hundreds of others who built your freedom without glory or fanfare.)


//Simply put, don't tread on us, and never question our patriotism.
 
2009-04-15 05:08:49 PM  
Students still have rights?

/how quaint
 
2009-04-15 05:13:44 PM  
Radworld4: I might buy to the protest angle but am more inclined to think that its just lazy kids making an excuse not to have to stand up. Even then its about showing some respect and courtesy. I don't share religous beliefs as my in-laws when they pray before meal but I don't go on a diatribe of why I think their beliefs are messed up. Any kid that is for this should have give an verbal explanation why to their principal. "Because I don't want to" is not a valid reason.

There is a fine line between protest and douchebaggery.


A more apt comparison would be if you just sat quietly during grace with your in-laws.

The article says nothing about a diatribe.

If the kids should be required to give an explanation, then what is your explanation to your in-laws for why you don't say grace?

Did you need to submit an essay? Or was a short presentation before the meal acceptable?
 
2009-04-15 05:14:59 PM  
I dont understand, you stand during the pledge to offer respect to a country that has given you everything you have. Its not about swearing loyalty to the country, God, or leader, its about respect. Why on earth are we teaching our kids its ok to not respect something that should damn well be respected? Showing respect to the pleadge is about as American as you can get. It doesnt mean you cant disagree with the president, or the direction our country is going. It means you respect the principles of what America was founded on. If this has become some cool new way of dissent its the wrong way to do it. How can you raise kids and expect them to respect you, the laws of the land, and the people living in it if you dont expect them to respect the pledge?
 
2009-04-15 05:17:50 PM  
sattizahn: who both frequently cross borders with a trunk full of fruit...

Hey now, let's leave your father out of this. He likes it in that trunk.
 
2009-04-15 05:17:59 PM  
I went to school in Marion County, FL and was not forced to stand during the Pledge, so I'm getting a kick out of most of these replies... etc.

Knowing both students and teachers down there, I guarantee this wasn't an issue until one teacher and one student decided to see how far they could push each other.

/sadly, this is all they have to do in that podunk county
//well, that and fark a lot
 
2009-04-15 05:18:32 PM  
Gdalescrboz: I dont understand, you stand during the pledge to offer respect to a country that has given you everything you have. Its not about swearing loyalty to the country, God, or leader, its about respect. Why on earth are we teaching our kids its ok to not respect something that should damn well be respected? Showing respect to the pleadge is about as American as you can get. It doesnt mean you cant disagree with the president, or the direction our country is going. It means you respect the principles of what America was founded on. If this has become some cool new way of dissent its the wrong way to do it. How can you raise kids and expect them to respect you, the laws of the land, and the people living in it if you dont expect them to respect the pledge?

"Kill the beast! Cut his throat! Spill his blood!"

/not too obscure, I hope
 
2009-04-15 05:18:40 PM  
4 Thou shalt not make unto thee any graven image, or any likeness of any thing that is in heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth.
5 Thou shalt not bow down thyself to them, nor serve them: for I the LORD thy God am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth generation of them that hate me;
6 And shewing mercy unto thousands of them that love me, and keep my commandments.

/c'mon fundies
 
2009-04-15 05:22:49 PM  
Syphilis_Smile: Radworld4: I might buy to the protest angle but am more inclined to think that its just lazy kids making an excuse not to have to stand up. Even then its about showing some respect and courtesy. I don't share religous beliefs as my in-laws when they pray before meal but I don't go on a diatribe of why I think their beliefs are messed up. Any kid that is for this should have give an verbal explanation why to their principal. "Because I don't want to" is not a valid reason.

There is a fine line between protest and douchebaggery.


"Because i dont want to" is a good enough answer for an American. I will never salute or pledge the flag unless i have decided, or have been called to, bear arms for its defense. Its bars are colored with the blood of my brethren, and to a man they would all call the Pledge the unpatriotic pile of european tyrannical crap that it actually is. This includes the 10 who fought at the first battle the flag was flown (Cooch's Bridge), a later general who standardized New Jersey's battleflag design, and an even later commodore who served on Shaef during the invasion of Normandy (not to mention the hundreds of others who built your freedom without glory or fanfare.)


//Simply put, don't tread on us, and never question our patriotism.



Well said, but the FA isn't about the pledge - it's about whether kids should stand while they, or others, pledge.

I see no problem with the standing part. It means nothing to those who don't subscribe to the pledge, but it shows the pledge-bots that you don't disrespect them on this one thing. It's a matter of politeness.

It's like lowering your head and stopping the fart jokes while grandma is saying a blessing at the dinner table: nobody's asking you to believe anything, just shut up for 30 seconds.

For those who are too intolerant for something so mundane as being polite to others: your intolerance is the single biggest problem in this crowded world and we'd all be better off if you were dead.

I'm an apathetic agnostic, but if you talk or fart while my grandma is doing her dinner voodoo, I guarantee you'll get a cool X-ray of a dinner fork stuck deep in the top of your head.
 
2009-04-15 05:23:48 PM  
I had to stand during 12 years of the pledge of allegiance.

I'm not christian, and I DON'T believe in a pledge you have to say more than once. That's the whole point of a oath, but whatever.

Any precious snowflakes think they don't have to stand during the pledge if I had to, and indeed would still have to if I worked in 'merica, would get a lesson in early 90's black sketch comedy when I break my foot off in their ass.

Homey don't play that.
 
2009-04-15 05:24:13 PM  
Gecko Gingrich: Also, I feel compelled to point out that time and again, the US Court system has upheld the idea that Rights don't even begin to start until you're 18.

In which case, they have no right to pledge their allegiance to anything. Pledging allegiance is a lot like a contract and since people under 18 can't generally join binding contracts, any pledge they make would be null and void.

The pledge of allegiance allegiance ends with "indivisible with liberty and justice for all".

So, it becomes ironic that we would force anyone to recite.

The constitution makes no real allowance to deny someone's rights based on their age, and certainly doesn't express any support for this sweeping denial of rights our society engages in, so there is a wonderful sense of irony as well as a missing-the-point aspect when this group (people under 18) is forced to pledge allegiance. When you further consider that they are one of a very few groups forced to recite the pledge and the only group that had no choice in the matter*, the irony goes taco supreme.

*Politicans, military personnel, and government employees may be required to say the pledge, but most likely not everyday AND they made a choice to be there.

If a 15 year old can't make an informed decision to have sex with me, she can't make an informed decision to pledge her allegiance to something.
 
2009-04-15 05:25:50 PM  
doglover: I had to stand during 12 years of the pledge of allegiance.

Holy shiat you talk slow, was it a special ed class?


/12 year pledge? Really?
 
2009-04-15 05:27:06 PM  
I didn't stand for or recite the pledge in middle school, along with about half the class (in Oregon, so...). I don't even recall it being played in high school. I'm athiest and disagree with the "under god" part, but that wasn't really the reason I didn't do it. I think it's just stupid and pointless. Reciting it isn't going to change anything, and I prefer to do things that have some sort of logical benefit of doing.
 
2009-04-15 05:28:23 PM  
In brightest day
In blackest night
No evil shall escape my sight
Let those who worship evil's might
Beware my power
GREEN LANTERN'S LIGHT!

/just sayin'
 
2009-04-15 05:29:18 PM  
Gdalescrboz: I dont understand, you stand during the pledge to offer respect to a country that has given you everything you have. Its not about swearing loyalty to the country, God, or leader, its about respect. Why on earth are we teaching our kids its ok to not respect something that should damn well be respected? Showing respect to the pleadge is about as American as you can get. It doesnt mean you cant disagree with the president, or the direction our country is going. It means you respect the principles of what America was founded on. If this has become some cool new way of dissent its the wrong way to do it. How can you raise kids and expect them to respect you, the laws of the land, and the people living in it if you dont expect them to respect the pledge?

If you're forcing a student to stand for the pledge you're curtailing their 1st Amendment rights. That's as un-American as you can get.
 
2009-04-15 05:29:28 PM  
The FA is not about forcing people to pledge.

It's about forcing able-bodied kids to stand up for 30 seconds.
 
2009-04-15 05:30:59 PM  
Chagrin: Gdalescrboz: I dont understand, you stand during the pledge to offer respect to a country that has given you everything you have. Its not about swearing loyalty to the country, God, or leader, its about respect. Why on earth are we teaching our kids its ok to not respect something that should damn well be respected? Showing respect to the pleadge is about as American as you can get. It doesnt mean you cant disagree with the president, or the direction our country is going. It means you respect the principles of what America was founded on. If this has become some cool new way of dissent its the wrong way to do it. How can you raise kids and expect them to respect you, the laws of the land, and the people living in it if you dont expect them to respect the pledge?

If you're forcing a student to stand for the pledge you're curtailing their 1st Amendment rights. That's as un-American as you can get.



Kids don't have any rights, you twit. If they did, why TF would half of them still be in school?
 
2009-04-15 05:34:09 PM  
Giblet: ... is there another reason why people shouldn't have to stand that *isn't* psychotic and retarded?

Um... because they're Americans, and Americans are supposedly free?
 
2009-04-15 05:34:19 PM  
it entertains me that some of the posters here are the same ones who call the UK a nanny state, or mock the royal family and call us "subjects" and here you are defending swearing blind obedience to a flag and the state. very liberated there, no fascist overtones at all.
 
2009-04-15 05:38:21 PM  
Chagrin: Gdalescrboz: I dont understand, you stand during the pledge to offer respect to a country that has given you everything you have. Its not about swearing loyalty to the country, God, or leader, its about respect. Why on earth are we teaching our kids its ok to not respect something that should damn well be respected? Showing respect to the pleadge is about as American as you can get. It doesnt mean you cant disagree with the president, or the direction our country is going. It means you respect the principles of what America was founded on. If this has become some cool new way of dissent its the wrong way to do it. How can you raise kids and expect them to respect you, the laws of the land, and the people living in it if you dont expect them to respect the pledge?

If you're forcing a student to stand for the pledge you're curtailing their 1st Amendment rights. That's as un-American as you can get.


Bingo. It's all hinged on the "forced" aspect.
 
2009-04-15 05:39:19 PM  
Digital Communist: Radworld4: I might buy to the protest angle but am more inclined to think that its just lazy kids making an excuse not to have to stand up. Even then its about showing some respect and courtesy. I don't share religous beliefs as my in-laws when they pray before meal but I don't go on a diatribe of why I think their beliefs are messed up. Any kid that is for this should have give an verbal explanation why to their principal. "Because I don't want to" is not a valid reason.

There is a fine line between protest and douchebaggery.

A more apt comparison would be if you just sat quietly during grace with your in-laws.

The article says nothing about a diatribe.

If the kids should be required to give an explanation, then what is your explanation to your in-laws for why you don't say grace?

Did you need to submit an essay? Or was a short presentation before the meal acceptable?


The difference is...I don't call attention to myself in their home. By not standing in a class room where the others are ...you are calling attention. I have not had give a explanation they know my viewpoint. Seated respectfully with my head down thinking of last nights episode of Lost is acceptable. To expound. Lets say when they sat down to say grace...I shoved back from the table and crossed my arms in protest. Making the group uncomfortable and myself the center of attention instead of showing a modicum of respect for others. It's a goverment funded school. If you don't want to say the pledge go to a private school or home school your kids. I don't think explaining your position is to much to ask if you want to be excluded.
 
2009-04-15 05:41:13 PM  
ThisOneBelongsToTheReds: Giblet: ... is there another reason why people shouldn't have to stand that *isn't* psychotic and retarded?

Um... because they're Americans, and Americans are supposedly free?



What bubble gum wrapper did you get that misinformation from?

All of our freedom documents declare that EVERYone has certain inalienable rights, or words to that effect. It doesn't limit anything to Americans, as the Americans of Mexico, Canada, Brazil, Peru, and all the other American countries will attest.

And lest you spend your last neuron on a lame retort: the US freedom docs don't mention US citizens either. It is and has always been EVERYONE.

Learn to read, then read, then give that time to sink through twenty meters of bone, then comment on lofty ideals that you currently neither understand nor ascribe to beyond a silverback's chest thump and defiant grunt.
 
2009-04-15 05:42:57 PM  
Giblet: Syphilis_Smile: Radworld4: I might buy to the protest angle but am more inclined to think that its just lazy kids making an excuse not to have to stand up. Even then its about showing some respect and courtesy. I don't share religous beliefs as my in-laws when they pray before meal but I don't go on a diatribe of why I think their beliefs are messed up. Any kid that is for this should have give an verbal explanation why to their principal. "Because I don't want to" is not a valid reason.

There is a fine line between protest and douchebaggery.


"Because i dont want to" is a good enough answer for an American. I will never salute or pledge the flag unless i have decided, or have been called to, bear arms for its defense. Its bars are colored with the blood of my brethren, and to a man they would all call the Pledge the unpatriotic pile of european tyrannical crap that it actually is. This includes the 10 who fought at the first battle the flag was flown (Cooch's Bridge), a later general who standardized New Jersey's battleflag design, and an even later commodore who served on Shaef during the invasion of Normandy (not to mention the hundreds of others who built your freedom without glory or fanfare.)


//Simply put, don't tread on us, and never question our patriotism.


Well said, but the FA isn't about the pledge - it's about whether kids should stand while they, or others, pledge.

I see no problem with the standing part. It means nothing to those who don't subscribe to the pledge, but it shows the pledge-bots that you don't disrespect them on this one thing. It's a matter of politeness.

It's like lowering your head and stopping the fart jokes while grandma is saying a blessing at the dinner table: nobody's asking you to believe anything, just shut up for 30 seconds.

For those who are too intolerant for something so mundane as being polite to others: your intolerance is the single biggest problem in this crowded world and we'd all be better off if you were dead.

I'm an apathetic agnostic, but if you talk or fart while my grandma is doing her dinner voodoo, I guarantee you'll get a cool X-ray of a dinner fork stuck deep in the top of your head.


Right on....thank you for making my point better than my ramblings.
 
2009-04-15 05:46:30 PM  
ThisOneBelongsToTheReds: Giblet: ... is there another reason why people shouldn't have to stand that *isn't* psychotic and retarded?

Um... because they're Americans, and Americans are supposedly free?


Oh they were young Americans...

/does his Bowie dance.
 
2009-04-15 05:49:03 PM  
Credy: Hairy_Potter: Credy

Enlighten me ...

What other options are there? It's a simple set of two choices that are mutually exclusive, a dichotomy. Apathy, or neutrality, means you cannot be proud or grateful of where you live.


I'll show my pride in my own manner. This may or may not be the same manner as yourself.

The amount of gray between your two points of black and white is infinite.

If you think it's necessary to stand up and profess your allegiance to something/someone in front of your peers (or in this case, classmates) that's your right. It's not a requirement, but a right. Which means that I and everybody else, just as you do, have the right not to.

As a citizen of this country, am I required to love this country?
What if I think it just sucks less than all the others?
What if I kinda like some things but not others?
What if I like most things about it, just not Everything?

At what point would you consider me to be ungrateful or without pride?

And finally, who said the decision was up to you?
 
2009-04-15 05:53:27 PM  
Pledge or GTFO
 
2009-04-15 05:58:03 PM  
TheBigBadCrystallineEntity: Pledge or GTFO

NO U

/we have to talk to him in his native language
 
2009-04-15 06:03:44 PM  
PROPOSAL to require students to stand. In other words, students not required to stand. Subby fails and Fark fails. Does Fark have any quality control whatsoever?

P.S. Pledges every day are idiotic. Students don't turn into commies overnight. "Yawn. I had a good sleep. Oh noes, I like Lenin!"
 
2009-04-15 06:06:21 PM  
No person should be forcibly compelled to make any sort of oath.

Even in court, the oath is meaningless, because perjury is still actionable.
 
2009-04-15 06:06:46 PM  
Ha ha ha - a lot of people get worked up over dumb shiat.
 
2009-04-15 06:09:35 PM  
I never said the pledge, just mumbled it so the teacher wouldn't bug me. It creeped me out. I didn't even know what the United States was, I was only 7 years old. They don't teach you much of anything about the US in school until middle school. Creepy.
 
2009-04-15 06:09:37 PM  
If you cannot or will not pledge allegiance to this country then go to one that doesn't require it. I think you will find it very different there.
 
2009-04-15 06:13:26 PM  
img27.imageshack.us

Handsome faces of school board.

As a former Florida teacher, I never required that students pledge. However, I required that they remain silent at their desks during all of the announcements including the pledge. If they wanted to stand and say the pledge, that was their choice. They were tardy and marked dropped immediately to a "B" for the day if they didn't comply.
 
2009-04-15 06:13:49 PM  
EmposterYou guys do realize that, legally, all a student has to do is get a signed note from their parents and they no longer have to recite or stand for the pledge, right?

Not in '94. I just friggin' sat. Fark the pledge. I respect the flag, not idiotic indoctrination.

UnspokenVoice
When you don't stand you're not making a statement, you're making a self-centered ass out of yourself.

I see no problem with that.

Elroyone Stand out of respect
Don't say it if it offends or disagrees with your beliefs


Standing disagrees with my beliefs.
 
2009-04-15 06:16:12 PM  
amiker77: OK, I have a real question about patriotism and respect and all that...

I know you're supposed to stand and put your hand over your heart for the pledge (if you choose to say the pledge), but what's the protocol for the national anthem? At hockey games, they tell the men to remove their hats, but they don't mention the hand over the heart thing. About half the crowd does it, half don't. Which is "correct," if it even matters?

/always wondered about that
//definitely not patriotic to yell "STARS!" when the words "stars" comes up in the anthem, but hey, I love me some Stars


There is no correct way. Even as military, you don't do the hand over heart in uniform. However you do in civilian clothes.

Either way, it's really just a manner of showing some respect to the history of the country and the freedoms we do have. If some jackass really wants to act like "oh i hate this country so much," well, I guess we defend his right to do that.

/Doesn't mean I agree with him
//Doesn't mean it would be safe for him if I caught him alone in a secluded area
 
2009-04-15 06:16:41 PM  
Farmerjohn48pan: If you cannot or will not pledge allegiance to this country then go to one that doesn't require it. I think you will find it very different there.

Oh, I thought the US was about freedom?
 
2009-04-15 06:17:40 PM  
It's called love of Country. Plain and simple. If you don't believe in God, fine. Don't say the words. I pisses me off to no end all the people that live in this country yet hate it and everything it stands for, but for some reason refuse to live anywhere else. I guess it's because they can't do most of the things they like to do ( like biatch and moan about their countries ) in many other places.
I'm one for patriotism. And not just in America. I've often desired to live abroad for a bit. If I do I assure you I will learn and respect that countries customs and rituals out of respect.
Plus, it's not cheating if it's your own dog.
 
2009-04-15 06:21:24 PM  
Sherlock Holmes N. Gardens: As a non-American, I've always been fascinated by this public ritual of yours. It was manufactured, as I understand it, in the 1950s at the same time all that 'Under God' business was added everywhere to differentiate the American body politic from the godless Reds.

That I get. What I don't get is how lining up to chant in unison, an oath that was written in the most conformist of American periods -- the post war red scare period -- is how you articulate your belief in individual choice. And woe to anyone who doesn't toe the line.

SH.
/Not bashing.
//Just interested


Actually, it was written in it's original form back in 1892 by Francis Bellamy. In 1923 the phrase "the Flag of the United States of America" was added. In 1954, Eisenhower encouraged Congress to add the words "Under God".

Source: click for it (new window)
 
2009-04-15 06:24:36 PM  
Chagrin 2009-04-15 05:29:18 PM
Gdalescrboz: I dont understand, you stand during the pledge to offer respect to a country that has given you everything you have. Its not about swearing loyalty to the country, God, or leader, its about respect. Why on earth are we teaching our kids its ok to not respect something that should damn well be respected? Showing respect to the pleadge is about as American as you can get. It doesnt mean you cant disagree with the president, or the direction our country is going. It means you respect the principles of what America was founded on. If this has become some cool new way of dissent its the wrong way to do it. How can you raise kids and expect them to respect you, the laws of the land, and the people living in it if you dont expect them to respect the pledge?

If you're forcing a student to stand for the pledge you're curtailing their 1st Amendment rights. That's as un-American as you can get.


I didnt say force them to stand, that would be wrong and counter-productive. However, we dont even try to teach kids the importance of respecting the pledge. I dont expect kids to automatically get it, we should however, teach them what its means, and tehn, if tehy still dont want to pay their respects, well then thats there perogative.
 
2009-04-15 06:29:48 PM  
Bill_Wick's_Friend: When I was a little kid and we recited the pledge of allegiance I always used to wonder if the "Republic Forwitchistan" was anywhere near Pakistan or Afghanistan.

Good thing we all recited those meaningless words every morning.


Thats ok. I butchered 'My Country Tis of Thee'.

/ I was in 3rd or 4th grade before I realized that they weren't talking about cake icing ('of thee icing')
// Nobody ever accused me of being overly quick on the uptake as a child
 
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