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(My San Antonio)   HOA is about to foreclose 84 homes in one neighborhood for not paying dues. One home that was about to be foreclosed on had a fine less than $300 dollars   (mysanantonio.com ) divider line
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14629 clicks; posted to Main » on 16 Mar 2009 at 10:19 AM (7 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2009-03-16 12:37:12 PM  

HotWingConspiracy: I still don't get how an outside party can foreclose on your home, even if you sign a piece of paper saying they can.


In some states, quasi-governmental bodies have permission to enforce rules. For example, in my home state, HOAs coming under a certain classification are authorized by law to levy fines and take foreclosure action.

Kevin5280: I've lived in a reasonable HOA neighborhood, but it seems that there are more and more "Just fork over the money and STFU because my watch says 7:02 and the trash cans are supposed to be in by 7:00 p.m." types who are more interested in making money wherever they can as opposed to creating a pleasant neighborhood.


My pal lives in an evil place. His HOA is run by the developer, who requires an 80% weighted (unsold homes count 20 for 1) vote for any rule change. So the developer holds and rents 6% of the houses to control the HOA forever.

This developer raised the fees and fines to crazy rates to pay himself. My pal managed to get elected president of the owner board, and forced the books open. He found around $800,000 in 2007 diverted from the HOA account to other developer accounts without reason. The local DA was uninterested in following up on any charges of wrongdoing.

Everyone in that development is screwed. Buyers learn the score pretty quickly from the comps, so houses there don't sell.
 
2009-03-16 12:37:55 PM  
therealpope: we were unable to complete repairs on a community fence and hire a competent trash service.

This is something I don't understand about HOA areas. We don't have them around here and my only contact with them is in fark threads.

Does the city not provide water, sewer, waste pickup, lighting, and maintenance of public areas (parks, paths, etc)? I pay city taxes that fund this. Do HOA residents not pay city taxes and instead hire 3rd party companies for this stuff?

The city bylaws also cover 90% of the basic rules people are frightened into signing into an HOA for as well. I just can't see point of HOAs other than groupthink.
 
2009-03-16 12:39:16 PM  
HOA corruption or any small scale quasigovernment organizations for that matter

1. Build a small collection of tight nit old folks. The elderly have the spare time to organize like no other group and are always able to make meetings and vote.

2. Promise exceptions to certain rules or additional communal projects strategically placed near supporters domiciles. Also, authorize no-bid contracts to supporters or your own lawncare services.

3. When running HOA meetings host them at the most inconvenient times for people who actually work. Do not allow dissenters to speak. Yes, this is actually allowed.

4. You win. HOAs are democracy in action.
 
2009-03-16 12:39:40 PM  
Sure, sure. Because nothing increases a home's value like being surrounded by a bunch of empty houses.

HOAs must be run by people too dumb to get government jobs.
 
2009-03-16 12:39:42 PM  

Liliac_Hill: My sister-in-law just bought a house in an HOA. She did read the contract, but she said it made no sense, contradicting itself in several places. IMHO, HOA's totally suck. That's what you need, like the government doesn't control enough of your life, cede still more control to your HOA.


I personally would probably NOT buy a house in a neighborhood unless an HOA had some control. I don't want some jackass neighbor painting their house pink with purple spots at about the time I'm getting ready to sell.
 
2009-03-16 12:40:48 PM  
Nuke these god damn cartels. They're fundamentally anti-American.
 
2009-03-16 12:43:42 PM  

MrSteve007:

Simply gorgeous.

RocketCarHead: I will have no part of this HOA cocksuckery.

Nice. Surprised it got through the filters.

jbrooks544: Foreclosing vs. going to small-claims court is silly.

People do need to realize though, that paying HOA or condo fees is not optional. It isn't conditional on you getting whatever services, etc. you might dispute, or anything else. If you own the property, you HAVE to pay the fee.

FEES ARE NOT CONDITIONAL upon anything. You own it, you pay it. period.


This has me thinking. I know this isn't unique to Baltimore, but in Baltimore if you're landlord isn't holding up his end of the contract (through unsafe living conditions, not making repairs etc.), there's a way for for the renter to go to city government/courts and have an escrow account set up that the rent is then paid to. This way the renter is still paying rent and cannot be evicted. But the landlord doesn't get the rent until the issues are resolved.

If this were a legitimate case of the HOA not fulfilling its side of the contract (which is what the article claimed and wouldn't surprise me because I have too many friends who've moved into HOA's that get nasty about dues but don't fulfill their end of the agreement), I think this kind of an option should be available. Paying dues is required but the homeowner should have some recourse.

/Doesn't actually know if there's other recourse available to homeowners like suing the HOA?
 
2009-03-16 12:44:29 PM  
They will not foreclose on those homes! If they foreclose on them then the HOA becomes responsible for the mortgage payment on those homes. They do not have the $$ for that!
 
2009-03-16 12:44:55 PM  
/my grammar sux today
//sorry
 
2009-03-16 12:48:15 PM  

lisarenee3505: I'll be damned if some group of strangers is going to tell me what I can and cannot do with my own property.


Joining an HOA is more than a contract. When you join an HOA, you are giving this organization a part-ownership interest in your property.

The HOA can foreclose because they own part of your house.

When you buy a house that is already part of an HOA, then the seller does not own 100% of the house to sell to you. You can only buy the part that the HOA does not already own.
 
2009-03-16 12:48:30 PM  

Sticky Hands: lisarenee3505: jbrooks544: Foreclosing vs. going to small-claims court is silly.

Property taxes


Yeah, what about them? That is not a case of someone telling me that I can't paint my house a particular color or fly the American flag on my front lawn. Property taxes go toward supporting the community as a whole, providing police, fire, sewer, and garbage services, among other things. I have no problem with that. HOAs come in and want you to pay again for those things. Its a racket and if people would simply stand up to them and take action, rather than being passive and just refusing to pay then rolling over when they try to foreclose, then we homeowners could finally really take back our homes.

Well, the rest of you can, I've already done it.
 
2009-03-16 12:48:41 PM  

hovsm: lisarenee3505: "Most communities have covenants that give a homeowners association the right to sue property owners, assess penalty fees and even foreclose if dues aren't paid."

Why would anyone even sign one of these things? HOAs are NOT legal entities, they cannot pass laws and they cannot MAKE a homeowner do anything. They have no legal authourity if you don't sign the damn piece of paper.

Look, if I decide to buy a house somewhere, I'm just going to buy it. Then when the local HOA comes to me and says "you have to sign this agreement or you can't live here", I tell them no thank you, I'll coordinate with the city myself for services. When they press the issue, I tell them to fark off. When they press the issue even further, I sue the crap out of THEM!. Trust me, this works in many places, as I've already done it three times and won. It is not difficult at all to take the tactics of an HOA that literally force people through intimidation and coersion to sign an agreement, and paint that organization as a racketeering front to a jury, not unlike the Mafia . Like I said, I've done it three times.

This is America, and here a person has domain over their own land. As long as you refust to sign up with an HOA and you handle your city cervices yourself, they absolutely CANNOT tell you what to do with or on your own land.

And for all of you pussies who say "well you HAVE to sign with them in order to live in the neighborhood" are spineless idiots who don't have the guts to stand up for your own rights. You'd rather just pay them a little blood money each month than make them understand what individual freedom means.

I don't think it's that easy. From what I heard the HOA contract is written into the deed. The person you are buying from is the HOA, they own the home and you buy it from them.


When I purchased a home it was neither the above. The HOA contract is a mandatory addendum to the sales contract. You would not be able to put in an offer on a house without agreeing in writing to mandatory membership into the HOA. For the few hundred dollars a year most people (like myself) see it as a necessary evil. (I have never seen a neighborhood in the DFW area without an HOA)

It is not a matter of ignoring the HOA when they come by and ask you to sign a piece of paper, your HOA is going about it bass-ackwards.
 
2009-03-16 12:50:32 PM  
Well, the rest of you can, I've already done it.

Surely you aren't suggesting that your anectdote regarding your experience with a particular HOA is indicative of the legal status of HOAs as a whole?

Wait, I think you are.
 
2009-03-16 12:51:25 PM  

Liliac_Hill: My sister-in-law just bought a house in an HOA. She did read the contract, but she said it made no sense, contradicting itself in several places. IMHO, HOA's totally suck. That's what you need, like the government doesn't control enough of your life, cede still more control to your HOA.


THIS
 
2009-03-16 12:51:32 PM  

clancifer: I personally would probably NOT buy a house in a neighborhood unless an HOA had some control. I don't want some jackass neighbor painting their house pink with purple spots at about the time I'm getting ready to sell.


Likelihood your HOA prevents your neighbor from doing something that would affect the value of your home: 0.000000001%
Likelihood you pay thousands of dollars a year to your HOA: 100%
 
2009-03-16 12:54:06 PM  
this HOA has apparently just commandeered the entire neighborhood. what an awesome HOA to live for. "We protect your property values, then take your house."
 
2009-03-16 12:54:59 PM  

Phinn: lisarenee3505: I'll be damned if some group of strangers is going to tell me what I can and cannot do with my own property.

Joining an HOA is more than a contract. When you join an HOA, you are giving this organization a part-ownership interest in your property.

The HOA can foreclose because they own part of your house.

When you buy a house that is already part of an HOA, then the seller does not own 100% of the house to sell to you. You can only buy the part that the HOA does not already own.


Sounds to me like you are chosing the wrong people to buy from then, my friend. Are you going to buy a car from someone who doesn't actually own the transmission? I think not, so why would you put yourself in the same situation with a home?

Believe it or not, when you own your home, YOU own it. When that deed has your name on it, it is yours lock, stock, and barrel, and no HOA can tell you what to do with it or how you can sell it. I would love to see some HOA try to tell me that they actually own a part of my home. They would get backed off my property with a shotgun stuck in their mug pretty quickly, and guess what! It is LEGAL to protect your own property from tresspassers in such a manner (well in my state, anyway).
 
2009-03-16 12:56:37 PM  
I'm on the board of our local HOA.

We maintain a nice recreation area. Lots of residents volunteer their labor.

When somebody complains to us about their neighbor's boat parked in the yard we say: "Sorry, we're not that kind of HOA. Call the county."

I think we do a pretty good job. Dues were recently raised from $50 to $75. Per year. Voluntary. 75% pay their dues.

The secret? Beer. We have regular parties. It keeps folks happy and promotes a sense of community.
 
2009-03-16 12:57:24 PM  
Why do HOA's hate our freedom?
 
2009-03-16 12:58:27 PM  

Liliac_Hill: My sister-in-law just bought a house in an HOA. She did read the contract, but she said it made no sense, contradicting itself in several places. IMHO, HOA's totally suck. That's what you need, like the government doesn't control enough of your life, cede still more control to your HOA.


As much as they suck ass, at least the HOA is a legitimate, voluntary organization. No one is part of an HOA that did not either (a) join it, (b) buy the property from someone who joined it, or (c) buy the property with the express contractual agreement to join it.

In contrast, the government's claim that it has the authority to control your property and/or force you to pay for the privilege of keeping it is totally involuntary, and therefore totally illegitimate and indefensible.
 
2009-03-16 12:59:36 PM  

Arnold T Pants: clancifer: I personally would probably NOT buy a house in a neighborhood unless an HOA had some control. I don't want some jackass neighbor painting their house pink with purple spots at about the time I'm getting ready to sell.


Oh okay, so you would rather infringe on the rights of another homeowner simply for a percieved protection to your profit? You would tell another person what to do with their own property just so you can maybe make a few extra bucks?

Sounds like you and people like the AIG execs and the Bernie Madoff's of the world would get along really well.

People like you are what make me want to shoot my neighbors in the crotch with a bean-bag gun... over and over and over again..
 
2009-03-16 01:01:30 PM  

lisarenee3505: Believe it or not, when you own your home, YOU own it. When that deed has your name on it, it is yours lock, stock, and barrel, and no HOA can tell you what to do with it or how you can sell it. I would love to see some HOA try to tell me that they actually own a part of my home. They would get backed off my property with a shotgun stuck in their mug pretty quickly, and guess what! It is LEGAL to protect your own property from tresspassers in such a manner (well in my state, anyway).


For someone who OPENLY claims to be smarter than others, you are PAINFULLY ignorant on the subject of covenants that run with the land. You should research that topic, Mrs. Lock, Stock and Barrel.
 
2009-03-16 01:01:44 PM  

DSEILXYC: I'm on the board of our local HOA.

We maintain a nice recreation area. Lots of residents volunteer their labor.

When somebody complains to us about their neighbor's boat parked in the yard we say: "Sorry, we're not that kind of HOA. Call the county."

I think we do a pretty good job. Dues were recently raised from $50 to $75. Per year. Voluntary. 75% pay their dues.

The secret? Beer. We have regular parties. It keeps folks happy and promotes a sense of community.


I have to admit, you guys sound like you're doing right. This is what HOAs are supposed to do.
 
2009-03-16 01:04:08 PM  
My HOA (basic coverage, $200 a year for mulch and signs) has a clause prohibiting firearm discharge on or in the property.

since NJ considers a BBGun as a Firearm, I'll be breaking the rules if I target practive in the basement or in the backyard.

OR if I have to shoot an intruder with a real gun. There are no exceptions.

So I mentioned this at a annual meeting to get it fixed (for the intruder part) You would have thought I fingerbanged all their daughters in front of them.

NO one comes to my house anymore. it is a wonderful side affect.
 
2009-03-16 01:08:31 PM  

clancifer: I personally would probably NOT buy a house in a neighborhood unless an HOA had some control. I don't want some jackass neighbor painting their house pink with purple spots at about the time I'm getting ready to sell.


That's your choice to have that kind of control of surrounding properties. Hopefully your neighbors share this same love of homogeneity.

It's my opinion that if you fork out hundreds of thousands of dollars to own a piece of the American dream, then you should be able to do whatever the Hell you want to your property so long as it doesn't violate any health regulations, doesn't go over your property line and is not obscene (and by obscene, I mean like painting the word "FARK" in big yellow letters on the side of your house). I personally wouldn't paint my house pink with purple spots, but if I really got the itch to do so, it should be my right for freedom of expression on MY property.

HOAs can be downright oppressive. Well, to each his own...
 
2009-03-16 01:09:17 PM  
trueaustinite>: For someone who OPENLY claims to be smarter than others, you are PAINFULLY ignorant on the subject of covenants that run with the land. You should research that topic, Mrs. Lock, Stock and Barrel.

Oh I have. You see that is why I have no problem ranting about this, because it comes from a position of authourity. If you are unaware of the loopholes and realities of the laws, perhaps it is you who should do some more research. I've done mine.
 
2009-03-16 01:11:56 PM  

weathermanfsu: They will not foreclose on those homes! If they foreclose on them then the HOA becomes responsible for the mortgage payment on those homes. They do not have the $$ for that!


Not true. The HOA will sell the homes as part of the foreclosure process - the buyer at the foreclosure sale will be responsible for paying the mortgage off (and it will most likely have to be lump sum, so the bids at the foreclosure sale will be very low). The HOA will take their fees out of the foreclosure purchase price and pass the rest (if any) back to the former owner.

As I said earlier, I think the HOA is doing this so that the banks will pay the fees, not the residents. This is the only process that guarantees the HOA will get every dime it is owed.
 
2009-03-16 01:12:01 PM  
You know what I love about people who think the easiest way to avoid a HOA is to not move into one? Well, I have news for you. HOAs are notorious for harrasing homeowners who own property adjacent to a HOA neighborhood.

It happened to me when a new housing development went in across the road from my house. When construction was complete on the first dozen or so houses, the developer set up an HOA, and tried to force the existing nearby homeowners to comply with their rules (even though we were not members of the HOA).

I was one of the owners who refused to comply. As a result, their HOA manager began lodging complaints with the township, claiming my property was in violation of township ordinances. Every other week, there was an inspector from the township on my property. They found NO violations.

However, because they received so many complaints, my property was labeled a "nuisance", and they started charging me each time an inspector had to be sent out to my property. I initially refused to pay, insisting they should be going after the person(s) filing all those false complaints. After all, the township had not found a single violation, so it was obvious there was no legit reason for the complaints.

I was wrong. It cost me 6 months of aggrivation and over $3000 in costs and fines before I gave in. But, rather than join the HOA, I moved. Let someone else deal with the HOA control freaks.
 
2009-03-16 01:12:08 PM  
If you are unaware of the loopholes and realities of the laws, perhaps it is you who should do some more research. I've done mine.

Which states are you licensed to practice law in?
 
2009-03-16 01:14:14 PM  

eddyatwork: I never understood why a HOA can even exist in the so called "land of the free".


Because one of the important freedoms in the "land of the free" is the freedom to contract. It's not the founders' or government's fault when someone agrees to a dumb contract.

/Unless that group is AIG, in which case their stupidity takes down the world's banking system.
 
2009-03-16 01:15:40 PM  

mod3072: I see your point, but it still seems like there should be a better way to reclaim those fees than foreclosure. Maybe there currently isn't, but there should be. The idea of giving that kind of authority to a few homeowners arbitrarily elected to a local board gives me the willies. Even the evil credit card companies won't take your home if you don't pay. Maybe they could just trash your credit and have someone make annoying phone calls to your house and work every 10 minutes until you cough it up?


Well, they can technically do that. If you owe the HOA a debt they could probably just sell that debt to a debt collector (at a deep discount of course) or just attempt to collect the debt themselves as a debt collector would. In this case, they may have already done some of the harassing phone call biz. They've certainly sent several "nastygrams" to the homeowners demanding that they pay up.

The problem with this is that the tools of coercion that a debt collector has are the exact same tools that the original holder of the debt has: If they don't pay, sue them, if you win and they still don't pay, seize their property.

Much like with the lawsuit route, you end where you begin. And much like the lawsuit route, the only difference is you pad the process with more time and costs to collect the money.
 
2009-03-16 01:16:45 PM  

VTCMart: hovsm: I don't think it's that easy. From what I heard the HOA contract is written into the deed. The person you are buying from is the HOA, they own the home and you buy it from them.

When I purchased a home it was neither the above. The HOA contract is a mandatory addendum to the sales contract. You would not be able to put in an offer on a house without agreeing in writing to mandatory membership into the HOA. For the few hundred dollars a year most people (like myself) see it as a necessary evil. (I have never seen a neighborhood in the DFW area without an HOA)

It is not a matter of ignoring the HOA when they come by and ask you to sign a piece of paper, your HOA is going about it bass-ackwards.


GRRRRR!!! How many times do I have to say it... there is NOTHING mandatory about joining an HOA simply to purchase a home. You just have to know that law and have to courage to stand up to people. You tear that addendum out, explain to the seller that you do not wish to join the HOA, then present the legal documentation that proves that it is illegal for any entity to demand that you agree to paid membership as a condition of purchase of real property.

Yes you might have to wait a few days while their lawyers go over it, but in the end they will fold because they know there is nothing they can do.
 
2009-03-16 01:17:31 PM  

Loreweaver: You know what I love about people who think the easiest way to avoid a HOA is to not move into one? Well, I have news for you. HOAs are notorious for harrasing homeowners who own property adjacent to a HOA neighborhood.

It happened to me when a new housing development went in across the road from my house. When construction was complete on the first dozen or so houses, the developer set up an HOA, and tried to force the existing nearby homeowners to comply with their rules (even though we were not members of the HOA).

I was one of the owners who refused to comply. As a result, their HOA manager began lodging complaints with the township, claiming my property was in violation of township ordinances. Every other week, there was an inspector from the township on my property. They found NO violations.

However, because they received so many complaints, my property was labeled a "nuisance", and they started charging me each time an inspector had to be sent out to my property. I initially refused to pay, insisting they should be going after the person(s) filing all those false complaints. After all, the township had not found a single violation, so it was obvious there was no legit reason for the complaints.

I was wrong. It cost me 6 months of aggrivation and over $3000 in costs and fines before I gave in. But, rather than join the HOA, I moved. Let someone else deal with the HOA control freaks.


Your real problem is the harassment you suffered at the hands of this mafia-style gang you call a "township" that presumes to have the right to (a) force you to comply with rules and regulations you did not voluntarily agree to abide by, and (b) charge you for complaints made by other people.

The problem is not HOAs. It's this hideous, destructive fiction called the state.
 
2009-03-16 01:18:42 PM  
Bestbank Tiger : If the HOA doesn't honor its end of the contract, can the homeowners foreclose on HOA property?

1) HOA stands for Homeowners Association. So if there are 100 houses, the 100 owners of those houses ARE THE HOA.

2) The HOA itself doesn't really own any property. Each of the homeowners owns their own home. There might be some pieces of property that are communally "owned", but what that really means is that each of the 100 hypothetical homeowners I mentioned above, each own 1/100th of that communal property.

3) Thus, suing the HOA is an abstract way of suing all 100 homeowners (yes, including yourself). And foreclosing on "HOA property" is like trying to foreclose on all 100 homeowners (each owning 1/100th of said communal property) once again, including yourself.

4) In most states, there are strict laws regarding what an HOA can and can not do. In my state, for example, rules are created/destroyed via voting. It requires a majority vote to get rules created or destroyed.

At the end of the day, if you have shiatty neighbors, you will have a shiatty HOA, and in that case, even if there wasn't an HOA, you would still have shiatty neighbors.

OTOH, if you have decent neighbors, then you will have a decent HOA.

The problem isn't HOAs, the problem is the HO's :D
 
2009-03-16 01:18:47 PM  

lisarenee3505: GRRRRR!!! How many times do I have to say it... there is NOTHING mandatory about joining an HOA simply to purchase a home. You just have to know that law and have to courage to stand up to people. You tear that addendum out, explain to the seller that you do not wish to join the HOA, then present the legal documentation that proves that it is illegal for any entity to demand that you agree to paid membership as a condition of purchase of real property.

Yes you might have to wait a few days while their lawyers go over it, but in the end they will fold because they know there is nothing they can do.


I am not arguing that this is not correct. I am saying that one may not, sans possible legal consequences, ignore the restrictions that one willingly contracted to abide by.
 
2009-03-16 01:20:46 PM  

trueaustinite: If you are unaware of the loopholes and realities of the laws, perhaps it is you who should do some more research. I've done mine.

Which states are you licensed to practice law in?


None, and you don't have to be licensed to practice law to understand the law and how it can be used to one's benefit. You just have to be willing to get out there and find the information for yourself.
 
2009-03-16 01:21:30 PM  

LarryDan43: 84 foreclosed and soon to be empty homes? Sweet, I'll let some squatters know.


Shane, Jackson and Marla seen fleeing the scene.
 
2009-03-16 01:22:08 PM  
trueaustinite: I am not arguing that this is not correct. I am saying that one may not, sans possible legal consequences, ignore the restrictions that one willingly contracted to abide by.

That's why I say don't enter into the agreement in the first place.
 
2009-03-16 01:22:46 PM  
So it's legal for people to sell themselves into slavery? Whatever happened to inalienable rights?

It's entirely legal to give away your rights -- just look how many voted to do the same when they elected The Obamessiah.
 
2009-03-16 01:25:26 PM  

Dr.Khron: For some reason, I was under the impression that the purpose of an HOA was to keep black people out of your neighborhood...

Since you can't do that anymore, we don't need HOAs anymore. And yet, they still exist.


Mostly they're to keep county taxes low, or at least county expenditures low. Most cities are built out so a lot of new building is city-like building that takes place in unincorporated areas of a county. However, counties aren't cities, and they don't offer city like services (because that would be expensive across the whole county). So usually rather than take over streets/garbage/water/sewer/septic systems built by a developer, and operate them, counties require the developer to create an HOA to maintain those common systems as a part of the agreement that will allow the rezoning or subdivision that enables residential houses to be built.
 
2009-03-16 01:25:30 PM  
Why would anyone buy a house that is covered by a HOA? You get what you ask for. Stop your biatching.
 
2009-03-16 01:27:47 PM  

lisarenee3505: trueaustinite: I am not arguing that this is not correct. I am saying that one may not, sans possible legal consequences, ignore the restrictions that one willingly contracted to abide by.

That's why I say don't enter into the agreement in the first place.


If you don't enter the agreement, you lose your bid to buy the house. Unless you can somehow finagle the law in your favor (which is nigh impossible here in PA), you don't buy the house.

What state do you live in?
 
2009-03-16 01:28:54 PM  

lisarenee3505: flashfry:This is all well and good, but entering the HOA was a condition of home purchase. As is the case in every other instance I have ever heard of.

See and that's where you are wrong. That is one of the underhanded tricks they use that is COMPLETELY ILLEGAL, but they count on most people not being aware of that. When they come across someone who wants to fight them, someone who demonstrates real knowledge of the law, they back down very quickly.

Like I said, Ive done thig three times. I'll be damned if some group of strangers is going to tell me what I can and cannot do with my own property.


Give me one piece of real property where you have successfully done this, troll. Don't give me the specific home, just a random home in that association. I want the name of the association you gracefully bowed out of. And I will call the assessor to tear apart your BS story.

You are so full of shiat you can only be a troll. And not a very good one.
 
2009-03-16 01:32:29 PM  

BrendaK: So it's legal for people to sell themselves into slavery? Whatever happened to inalienable rights?

It's entirely legal to give away your rights -- just look how many voted to do the same when they elected The Obamessiah.


Okay you can go DIAF after being raped repetedly by Armenians wearing glass-lined condoms. You DO NOT talk shiat about the President unless you can provide some evidence of Bush doing a better job.. or any job other than destroying the economy and dragging us into an illegal war. Until then, you need to STFU and learn your place, which as an obvious Rethuglican is down in the gutter. You people are FINISHED, don't you get it?!? YOU PEOPLE have come very close to destroying this country and now you want to talk shiat about the man who is going to pull us back from the brink?

Such arrogance! Such audacity!! It is my sincerest hope that some group of concerned REAL Americans will get together and start removing Rethugs from society by any means necessary.
 
2009-03-16 01:33:31 PM  
antique1960: Why would anyone buy a house that is covered by a HOA? You get what you ask for. Stop your biatching.

The original intent of HOAs was to maintain community property. That would be parks, fences, gates, pools, clubhouses, golf courses, signage, etc etc.

Some HOAs, however, went too far and started restricting things like the colors you can paint your house, etc. Those, IMO are the bad ones, and are the ones that you hear about on fark all the time.

What it comes down to is that HOAs that have those kinds of rules, are filled with people who want said rules. Otherwise, if the majority of people in the HOA didn't care about house colors, they would start a vote and have that rule tossed.

So, I put HOAs into the following categories.

Condo HOAs : required, simply due to the amount of communal property.

House HOAs (with communal property) : required, due to the amount of communal property.

Hose HOAs (without communal property) : not required (no communal property). These are the HOAs where you get all of the busybodies and bad neighbor action.
 
2009-03-16 01:37:07 PM  

lisarenee3505: GRRRRR!!! How many times do I have to say it... there is NOTHING mandatory about joining an HOA simply to purchase a home. You just have to know that law and have to courage to stand up to people. You tear that addendum out, explain to the seller that you do not wish to join the HOA, then present the legal documentation that proves that it is illegal for any entity to demand that you agree to paid membership as a condition of purchase of real property.


Okay, since you've done your homework and done this 3 times apparently, please provide a link to that law. And since your opinion seems to apply universally, that damn well better be a federal law.

/pretty sure you've got jack and shiat.
 
2009-03-16 01:39:27 PM  

lisarenee3505: trueaustinite: I am not arguing that this is not correct. I am saying that one may not, sans possible legal consequences, ignore the restrictions that one willingly contracted to abide by.

That's why I say don't enter into the agreement in the first place.


Whether you decide to become a dues-paying member of the HOA or not, how does that affect the covenants on the land? Don't you agree to those covenants not by joining the HOA, but by buying the real property in the first place?
In other words, doesn't the transfer deed itself says "the HOA can restrict some things"?
 
2009-03-16 01:40:29 PM  
HOAs foreclosing? Yea, nothing brings up property values like a bunch of foreclosures in the neighborhood. Excellent HOA work!

Sounds like some housewife-Hitler is really into the whole "cut off your nose to spite your face" mentality.

/Godwin like you mean it!
 
2009-03-16 01:42:26 PM  
flashfry: Give me one piece of real property where you have successfully done this, troll. Don't give me the specific home, just a random home in that association. I want the name of the association you gracefully bowed out of. And I will call the assessor to tear apart your BS story.

You are so full of shiat you can only be a troll. And not a very good one.

So you want one piece of property, yet you don't want a specific home? Well seeing as that I'm probably the ONLY person in the neighborhood who has done this, giving you a random house address wouldn't do you much good would it?

And what assessor is going to divulge information about a unique legal situation that, if that information became public knowledge, would severely threaten their ability to continue to extort money from homeowners.

You're not very good at this logic thing, are you?
 
2009-03-16 01:45:20 PM  
lisarenee3505

Well come on, if it's the law of the land, it should be easy for you to just provide the law you used. Hell, you'd be helping a lot of farkers out by just sharing the knowledge.

/if you weren't full of shiat
//which of course you are.
///which is why I have marked you to be put on ignore next time I see you spout stupidity
 
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