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(Bloomberg)   Applications to the top liberal-arts schools drop 20% as students realize there is no longer any need to earn a Liberal Arts degree to remain unemployable   (bloomberg.com) divider line
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676 clicks; posted to Business » on 10 Mar 2009 at 7:45 AM (10 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2009-03-10 01:38:16 AM  
Our society has changed from a half-century ago, when a high-school education was sufficient for the majority of the workforce. Now, a B.A. is often not enough for some employers - liberal arts degrees became the equivalent of the old high-school diploma. I don't blame employers, because the grade school curricula often has failed to keep up with the demands of new American industries.
 
2009-03-10 01:47:43 AM  

UNC_Samurai: the grade school curricula often has failed to keep up with the demands of new American industries.


Not to mention, other countries often teach things at a MUCH lower grade level than we do here, which puts us at a disadvantage up front.
 
2009-03-10 01:49:41 AM  
Godanmed libs. This is what you get. Obama had this all planned out. Who's going to fill those empty seats? Black people, and we're going to be paying their bill with the stimulus package. Good luck seeing a white president in the White House ever again.

*adjusts tin-foil hat*
 
2009-03-10 01:56:38 AM  

EL_FABREZ: Godanmed libs. This is what you get. Obama had this all planned out. Who's going to fill those empty seats? Black people, and we're going to be paying their bill with the stimulus package. Good luck seeing a white president in the White House ever again.

*adjusts tin-foil hat*


Poor attempt, too transparent and obvious.

2 / 10 (and the only reason it's that high is that someone might bite because you said "black people")
 
2009-03-10 01:59:55 AM  
While we're on the subject of Williams College, let me be the first to say:

Suck it, MCLA!

/and Suck it, Liberal Arts Degrees
 
2009-03-10 02:14:26 AM  
The article has nothing to do with how useless a liberal arts degree is, but with how it isn't worth going to the most expensive schools to get those degrees when you can get it for "cheap" at a public university. This has lead to a higher chance of kids getting into more "prestigious" universities because there is less competition.

God damnit people, RTFA before going full retard on your soap box.
 
2009-03-10 02:28:23 AM  
Private school is too goddamn expensive and not worth the decades of debt. Also, we need better trade schools, not everyone needs to go to college. See Europe on this one.
 
2009-03-10 02:51:44 AM  

coco ebert: Private school is too goddamn expensive and not worth the decades of debt. Also, we need better trade schools, not everyone needs to go to college. See Europe on this one.


All schools should be public. It should be illegal to have a private school.
 
2009-03-10 03:17:04 AM  
coco ebert: Private school is too goddamn expensive and not worth the decades of debt.

Unless you're really smart and want to go into art, engineering or architecture and can get into Cooper Union. Which has no tuition and never has.
 
2009-03-10 03:26:44 AM  
The thing that really annoys me is that so few people realize that a lot of what was taught in middle and high school would be considered the liberal arts. Virtually everything in the English, Social Studies, and Foreign Language departments in high school are liberal arts, as are all the traditionally geeky extra curricular activities of band, choir, orchestra, and drama.

Of course, considering that funding is getting slashed in all of those areas except for English as a result of lazy administrating and deciding to teach kids how to pass a test instead of actually teaching them how to learn, I shouldn't be surprised at the derision often heaped on the liberal arts.
 
2009-03-10 06:27:19 AM  
Liberal arts degrees at schools like Williams are stepping stones to medical, legal and other advanced degrees.

from the Wiliams site, After Williams:

Our graduates capture a lion's share-about 20 annually-of the world's top grants and fellowships for further study, travel, and research. The prestige factor also enters into graduate and professional school choices-including every Ivy League and major American research university-where up to 20 percent of each Williams class enrolls directly after graduation. Five to ten years out of Williams, that number swells to more than 70 percent. Williams students applying to medical schools have a better-than-90 percent acceptance rate. Those applying to law, business, and science Ph.D. programs are accepted at rates higher than 99 percent.

Suck it, purveyors of non-liberal arts hocum.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2009-03-10 07:05:43 AM  
My sister got a job with a liberal arts degree working in TV and movies.

But I enjoyed the headline anyway.
 
2009-03-10 07:20:22 AM  

sloppy shoes: All schools should be public. It should be illegal to have a private school.


Why stop with schools? It should be illegal to have any private property, I say. But you should still have to pay for it. Just that anyone would be allowed to use it after you do, and you can't say anything about it.
 
2009-03-10 07:22:59 AM  

ZAZ: My sister got a job with a liberal arts degree working in TV and movies.


Why is a liberal arts degree working in TV and movies?
 
2009-03-10 07:54:22 AM  

AntiNorm: UNC_Samurai: the grade school curricula often has failed to keep up with the demands of new American industries.

Not to mention, other countries often teach things at a MUCH lower grade level than we do here, which puts us at a disadvantage up front.


Depends on the school. In Japan, I see some few kids doing trig in middle school. On the other hand, Their elementary school takes 6 years, making them around 9th grade. The kids in my school started trig in 9th grade, too.

Not to mention that hating on liberal arts is all great, but all the really "great" people in history went with either liberal or fine arts. Very few business men are ever remembered for doing a good job more than a hundred years. A great poet like Homer will live on and on, long after his country is no more than dust.
 
2009-03-10 07:59:19 AM  

doglover: Not to mention that hating on liberal arts is all great, but all the really "great" people in history went with either liberal or fine arts. Very few business men are ever remembered for doing a good job more than a hundred years. A great poet like Homer will live on and on, long after his country is no more than dust.


1. There are some physicists, physicians, engineers, and a host of other technicians who would disagree that poets comprise 100% of the really great people.

2. Homer probably ate dirt and bugs, while the businessmen were able to feed their families.
 
2009-03-10 08:05:19 AM  
kids with a degree from Amherst will not have a hard time finding employment
 
jgi
2009-03-10 08:05:48 AM  
I am tired of Fark's hate on the liberal arts. Do you people not care about culture? Should we all just live in gray cement block buildings and spend our days crunching numbers for the government? It's great that you went to school for a hard science and are happy with what you do. People are different. But you should really thank people who throw their lives into the arts, despite all the extremely difficult sacrifices they have to make to survive, because these are the people that shape our culture. If you enjoy reading, watching television or movies, going to museums, listening to music, then it's really hypocritical to hate on the arts.
 
2009-03-10 08:15:18 AM  

jgi: Do you people not care about culture? Should we all just live in gray cement block buildings and spend our days crunching numbers for the government?


Do you think that liberal arts majors are 100% of the people who create art? Do you think that trust fund hippies who spend more time trying to be edgy and work on their bongo drum skills contribute more to society than an engineer does?
 
jgi
2009-03-10 08:17:50 AM  

EatHam: Do you think that liberal arts majors are 100% of the people who create art? Do you think that trust fund hippies who spend more time trying to be edgy and work on their bongo drum skills contribute more to society than an engineer does?


Do you think 0% of the people who create art were liberal arts majors? If you think all the people who study liberal arts are "trust fund hippies" then I think you're misinformed.
 
2009-03-10 08:19:48 AM  

EL_FABREZ: Godanmed libs. This is what you get. Obama had this all planned out. Who's going to fill those empty seats? Black people, and we're going to be paying their bill with the stimulus package. Good luck seeing a white president in the White House ever again.

*adjusts tin-foil hat*


Well, I think you needed to say "socialist" at least twice, and invoke Christian paranoia as well. But I'm gonna give you a 4

.
 
2009-03-10 08:21:05 AM  

jgi: Do you think 0% of the people who create art were liberal arts majors? If you think all the people who study liberal arts are "trust fund hippies" then I think you're misinformed.


No, I'm just saying that studying liberal arts is not necessary for creating art. I am also saying that while not all liberal arts majors are trust fund hippies, nearly all trust fund hippies are liberal arts majors.

Also, if I'm going to be expected to pay for it, I want them to do something useful. If you are going to have the government fund a liberal arts education, you should be prepared to justify it by something more than "I may, at some point, create art that someone might want to see. Or I may play with fingerpaints and declare myself to be a great artist"
 
2009-03-10 08:24:16 AM  

BigSnatch: The article has nothing to do with how useless a liberal arts degree is, but with how it isn't worth going to the most expensive schools to get those degrees when you can get it for "cheap" at a public university. This has lead to a higher chance of kids getting into more "prestigious" universities because there is less competition.

God damnit people, RTFA before going full retard on your soap box.


Don't you dare come strolling in here with your knowledge of things!
 
2009-03-10 08:26:01 AM  

sloppy shoes: All schools should be public. It should be illegal to have a private school.


Why?

If the public schools are failing, and you have the money to afford a better education, why shouldn't you be allowed to seek it out? If the government and if you have a problem with the free education being shiat and the rich getting a good education, then fix the public schools, don't force all people to be equally stupid because it's more fair that way.
 
2009-03-10 08:26:09 AM  

notmtwain: Liberal arts degrees at schools like Williams are stepping stones to medical, legal and other advanced degrees.


Aren't all degrees stepping stones to medical, legal, and other advanced degrees if the person wants them to be?

I find it very hard to believe that a liberal arts major would have an advantage over a biology/chem major for getting into med school. In fact, the biology/chem major would have a huge advantage over the liberal arts guy once the first day of med school classes came around.

So yeah. Liberal arts, like literally every other class of degrees, can be a stepping stone to something useful. It's just the worst possible stepping stone possible.
 
2009-03-10 08:27:25 AM  
In summary:
They see ΦΒΚ's rollin',
They be hatin'.
 
jgi
2009-03-10 08:43:01 AM  

EatHam: No, I'm just saying that studying liberal arts is not necessary for creating art. I am also saying that while not all liberal arts majors are trust fund hippies, nearly all trust fund hippies are liberal arts majors.


I don't know if anybody said a liberal arts degree is necessary for creating art. But being in school for your art allows you to work with peers and see what other people are working on giving you a modern perspective, it allows you access to instructors who have been through the art world and have had success, and it allows access to necessary tools to create art. You might want to make pottery but good luck making it if you don't have a kiln. School is not always necessary but the benefits of going are great; if you really want to be knowledgeable about what you're getting yourself into, you really need to study.

Also, if I'm going to be expected to pay for it, I want them to do something useful. If you are going to have the government fund a liberal arts education, you should be prepared to justify it by something more than "I may, at some point, create art that someone might want to see. Or I may play with fingerpaints and declare myself to be a great artist"

Ah, so you think you're paying for it. Really, you're not. Since when does the government completely fund liberal arts educations? How many people do you know had their liberal arts education explicitly funded by the government using your money? Everybody I know had loans. Maybe people default on those loans and the cost comes back to you (our current situation), but people default on loans for all kinds of things all the time. Why blame just the artists?

Just because a few artists are the hippy types who "play with fingerpaints," that doesn't mean there aren't plenty of artists who are toiling away on something that, one day, your kids might study in school. Art is important to our culture and to the success of America. It's really time we supported artists more. They're not a bunch of airheaded, trustfunders, who fart and call it art. There is loads of worthwhile art out there if you just open your eyes. Life is not all about science and numbers.
 
2009-03-10 08:49:18 AM  

jgi: Ah, so you think you're paying for it. Really, you're not.


I'm not? I could swear that I was. If I'm not paying for it, then go nuts, do whatever you want.

jgi: Art is important to our culture


Certainly, no argument there.

jgi: Maybe people default on those loans and the cost comes back to you (our current situation), but people default on loans for all kinds of things all the time. Why blame just the artists?


Because taking out a loan to become an artist is the same thing as taking out a loan that you have no intention of ever paying back. Intelligent people do not take out $100k worth of loans to learn how to make pottery because they know that they have approximately zero chance of using $100k worth of pottery-making skills in their lifetime.
 
2009-03-10 08:52:23 AM  

doglover: Very few business men are ever remembered for doing a good job more than a hundred years.


Considering business was essentially the "thing" of the 20th century, it hasn't been long enough to tell has it?
 
2009-03-10 08:54:54 AM  

EatHam: jgi: Do you people not care about culture? Should we all just live in gray cement block buildings and spend our days crunching numbers for the government?

Do you think that liberal arts majors are 100% of the people who create art? Do you think that trust fund hippies who spend more time trying to be edgy and work on their bongo drum skills contribute more to society than an engineer does?


Yes and no. Trust fund hippies are wastes of life, usually. They are prone to hedonism and spiral off to become libertines and die young and full of drugs. On the other hand, engineers have given us a host of marvels. Thanks to them we have the internet, a living breathing model of such mythical stores of knowledge as were rumored to be property of the gods themselves.

However, businessmen and merchants throughout history have done little more than a net positive gain. For ever philanthropist there's a hundred money grubbers. A Standard Oil to ooze all over every Schindler's List, if you will. Don't even try to deny it as even now the bitter harvest sown by petty greed of thousands has shaken the very foundations of the entire world's economic system.

These days, poets by name are in fact NOT poets by trade. I think you will find musicians, actors, animators, and all those in the entertainment industry fill the role of bard and player now. Even a god among men like Tesla, whose own work set in motion so many other great works which even now shape our lives, cannot compare with the impact on society the Schwarzeneggers and the John Lennons have had in the same time period.

Engineers have given us things, but most of them will admit to having an inspiration. Be it a book, a movie, or even just a picture. Star Trek probably did more for the advancement of cell phone technology than any mere engineer. Gundam, laughable by scientific standards, has produced some of the BEST robotics engineers in the world by shaping young men's ambition by giving them a goal that no one thinks is possible.
 
2009-03-10 09:07:06 AM  

sloppy shoes: coco ebert: Private school is too goddamn expensive and not worth the decades of debt. Also, we need better trade schools, not everyone needs to go to college. See Europe on this one.

All schools should be public. It should be illegal to have a private school.


Really? Why?

Seriously, I'm not following your logic at all, mainly because you didn't present any. Here, I'll counter you with equal logical rigor:

All schools should be private. We should kill anyone who tries to teach by being paid by the government, it's at least as bad as murder.
 
2009-03-10 09:11:45 AM  
Unlike many, I use both my degrees every day:

I speak English, and I deal with crazy people (Psychology).

I am a computer support technician. (which, technically, I have
a degree in as well).

/BA's in English & Psychology (Double Major), 'mini' in Comp Sci.
/Rutgers University '88
 
2009-03-10 09:23:32 AM  
That was rather well played, subby. You used the current economic conditions as a twist to what otherwise would've been a tired cliche. I LOLed.
 
jgi
2009-03-10 09:25:53 AM  

EatHam: Because taking out a loan to become an artist is the same thing as taking out a loan that you have no intention of ever paying back. Intelligent people do not take out $100k worth of loans to learn how to make pottery because they know that they have approximately zero chance of using $100k worth of pottery-making skills in their lifetime.


Do you know anybody who took out $100k in loans to study pottery?

What about people who took out $500k in loans to buy a mortgage they couldn't afford? I would rather have $100k in student loan debt than $500k in mortgage debt. At least the student loan debt means I'm probably educated. Having a mortgage I could never afford just means I'm definitely stupid.

Artists are weirdos and unrealistic and emotional and all that. For sure. But there are people like that from all stripes of life. Who is more of a detriment to society, an artist who took out student loans that he'll have difficulty paying back or a high-level investment banker who fleeced people out of millions? The hate on liberal arts majors is just unfounded. They do a lot for society and we should finally start recognizing that. Ask your doctor what he/she studied before they went to med school. Mine got a BA in English.
 
2009-03-10 09:26:47 AM  
The liberal arts are an important part of your education, but for almost everyone they should comprise only a portion of that education.

Its pretty simple, is it not?
 
2009-03-10 09:29:52 AM  

DjangoStonereaver: /BA's in English & Psychology (Double Major)


The whole double/multiple major thing is getting out of control. There is a student at my university who is working on five majors. We're considering not offering double majors anymore.
 
jgi
2009-03-10 09:40:13 AM  

alaskan gold digger: The liberal arts are an important part of your education, but for almost everyone they should comprise only a portion of that education.


Why?
 
2009-03-10 09:49:04 AM  

jgi: EatHam: Because taking out a loan to become an artist is the same thing as taking out a loan that you have no intention of ever paying back. Intelligent people do not take out $100k worth of loans to learn how to make pottery because they know that they have approximately zero chance of using $100k worth of pottery-making skills in their lifetime.

Do you know anybody who took out $100k in loans to study pottery?

What about people who took out $500k in loans to buy a mortgage they couldn't afford? I would rather have $100k in student loan debt than $500k in mortgage debt. At least the student loan debt means I'm probably educated. Having a mortgage I could never afford just means I'm definitely stupid.

Artists are weirdos and unrealistic and emotional and all that. For sure. But there are people like that from all stripes of life. Who is more of a detriment to society, an artist who took out student loans that he'll have difficulty paying back or a high-level investment banker who fleeced people out of millions? The hate on liberal arts majors is just unfounded. They do a lot for society and we should finally start recognizing that. Ask your doctor what he/she studied before they went to med school. Mine got a BA in English.


Yeah, the private university I attended for law school has loads of kids who paid more than $100k for some liberal arts degree. Conversely, the school also has a very good architecture program that would make that an investment worth looking into. And as for your choice between a $100k student debt load and a $500k debt load, well, the mortgage is dischargeable in bankruptcy. Student loans are not. And most of the doctors I know majored in science because I believe they have to have a hard science background to sit for the MCAT, so unless your doctor got his MD during the Eisenhower Administration, I'm finding that hard to believe, unless it was a double major.

/I have a BA from a liberal arts school, and I am getting a kick out of these replies.
 
2009-03-10 10:02:24 AM  

LouDobbsAwaaaay: DjangoStonereaver: /BA's in English & Psychology (Double Major)

The whole double/multiple major thing is getting out of control. There is a student at my university who is working on five majors. We're considering not offering double majors anymore.


Absolutely terrified to step out into the real world, isn't he? I knew a guy like that in college...28 years old, 3 majors, 2 minors (in completely unrelated fields).
 
2009-03-10 10:02:42 AM  

jgi: I am tired of Fark's hate on the liberal arts. Do you people not care about culture? Should we all just live in gray cement block buildings and spend our days crunching numbers for the government? It's great that you went to school for a hard science and are happy with what you do. People are different. But you should really thank people who throw their lives into the arts, despite all the extremely difficult sacrifices they have to make to survive, because these are the people that shape our culture. If you enjoy reading, watching television or movies, going to museums, listening to music, then it's really hypocritical to hate on the arts.


I believe it has to do with the fact that Liberal Art majors arent the degenerate losers that people with other majors need them to be to feel better about themselves. I equate it to rival instate schools.

There's always one school who is deemed more prestigious than the other. The other school is perceived to be a little more laid back but still a great school. The first school plays down the seconds academic accomplishments to prop themselves up even though both schools produce scholars and successful people.

If all Liberal Arts majors were actually on par with someone with just a GRE then we wouldnt see articles with headlines like this. It would just be ignored.
 
2009-03-10 10:06:02 AM  
I majored in philosophy!11!1!! Hi mom! I'm on the internets!11!!1one!!11onehundredeleventy!1
 
2009-03-10 10:06:40 AM  

LouDobbsAwaaaay: DjangoStonereaver: /BA's in English & Psychology (Double Major)

The whole double/multiple major thing is getting out of control. There is a student at my university who is working on five majors. We're considering not offering double majors anymore.


That is patently absurd. We had a girl in our military history/national security department who was also a biology major. I think she's working for DHS studying bioterrorism.
 
2009-03-10 10:08:57 AM  

jgi: EatHam: Because taking out a loan to become an artist is the same thing as taking out a loan that you have no intention of ever paying back. Intelligent people do not take out $100k worth of loans to learn how to make pottery because they know that they have approximately zero chance of using $100k worth of pottery-making skills in their lifetime.

Do you know anybody who took out $100k in loans to study pottery?

What about people who took out $500k in loans to buy a mortgage they couldn't afford? I would rather have $100k in student loan debt than $500k in mortgage debt. At least the student loan debt means I'm probably educated. Having a mortgage I could never afford just means I'm definitely stupid.




You are conflating a number of issues.

1) Not everyone that gets a LA degree is going for an advanced degree later
2) Mortgages have nothing to do it

I have a friend that got a degree in psychology - and works in a factory right now. Another friend went to an exclusive private school and has $75k in debt. She currently makes about $25-30k a year working for the IRS. How many decades will it be before she pays off her loans?


The problem is not the worth of the subjects studied, but the worth and reason for getting a degree. Liberal arts degrees are the easy path to take after high school. You can go to college and have the government or your parents pay for it. You party for 4 years, and don't have to put in much effort. Afterwards, with big debt and no marketable skills, you end up doing whatever you cna find.

The issue of attacking LA majors is not a lack of culture or desire for culture, but due to constant anecdotal reminders. When all the unemployed people you know from college got degrees in LA, it is a clue that there is a problem.
 
2009-03-10 10:19:01 AM  

gundamtsubasa: Virtually everything in the English, Social Studies, and Foreign Language departments in high school are liberal arts


"Liberal arts" can mean an awful lot of different things. People wouldn't make fun of the basket weavers if they didn't exist. On the other hand, I'm surrounded by liberal arts majors who have steady jobs not related to waiting tables. My physics degree came from my alma mater's "liberal arts" school; I've spent half my working life (and counting) as an engineer. A close friend of mine using a philosophy degree as a stepping stone to law school. And a foreign language degree doesn't cut it by itself any more; without specialized knowledge, your foreign language skills are useless. So, for example, a Japanese Studies & Philosophy double major (which would be derided in Fark as absolutely useless) would be a gateway to bilingual law. That is a very high-paying job; the person I know who does that for a living lives in a large high-rise apartment in Roppongi (think "Japanese equivalent of Manhattan").

I still enjoy jokes about liberal arts majors, though.
 
2009-03-10 10:26:33 AM  

MadAsshatter:
Absolutely terrified to step out into the real world, isn't he? I knew a guy like that in college...28 years old, 3 majors, 2 minors (in completely unrelated fields).


Meh. I got three majors in four years. No minors, though. It's easy enough to accomplish if you've got the intellectual curiosity for it. I started out going after a major in history, and found myself with enough credits towards a major in religion and English that I figured, why not go for those as well?

Ultimately, the second two majors didn't have much functional use other than as resume padding, but I learned a lot going for 'em, and it certainly didn't hurt me.

/also have a MA in history and an MLS
//working as an academic digital librarian
///because we can't all be engineers
 
2009-03-10 10:27:44 AM  

EMCGuy:

I have a friend that got a degree in psychology - and works in a factory right now. Another friend went to an exclusive private school and has $75k in debt. She currently makes about $25-30k a year working for the IRS. How many decades will it be before she pays off her loans?


If the IRS is like other government agencies they will pay her loans off for her. Where I work we pay off 10k a year for all new hires.
 
jgi
2009-03-10 10:31:04 AM  

EMCGuy: You are conflating a number of issues.

1) Not everyone that gets a LA degree is going for an advanced degree later
2) Mortgages have nothing to do it


True. I was just comparing types of debt that are accrued when people take out more than they can handle in the future. They don't really relate other than that.

I have a friend that got a degree in psychology - and works in a factory right now. Another friend went to an exclusive private school and has $75k in debt. She currently makes about $25-30k a year working for the IRS. How many decades will it be before she pays off her loans?

Getting a degree in psychology won't really land you a job in psychology unless you go to graduate school and become a researcher or go further to become a psychologist/psychiatrist. I think all psychology majors know this. Maybe your friend didn't really love psychology and just got the degree to get a degree. I don't know. As for your other friend with the large debt, she works for the government. Her job is more secure than the private sector and if she takes on more responsibility she'll be making good money in a couple years. But maybe money isn't very important to her. Maybe she doesn't live to work. If a low-paying, low-stress office job allows her to pay her monthly bills and do what she loves in her spare time, that's the important thing.

The problem is not the worth of the subjects studied, but the worth and reason for getting a degree. Liberal arts degrees are the easy path to take after high school. You can go to college and have the government or your parents pay for it. You party for 4 years, and don't have to put in much effort. Afterwards, with big debt and no marketable skills, you end up doing whatever you cna find.

You're making the generalization that liberal arts majors are lazy and just want to party in college. You're also assuming that liberal arts majors don't have marketable skills. Sure, some don't. But others also really love things that make them marketable: like computers. I think one of the great things that liberal arts teaches you is that there is not just one path, not just one thing to be interested in.

The issue of attacking LA majors is not a lack of culture or desire for culture, but due to constant anecdotal reminders. When all the unemployed people you know from college got degrees in LA, it is a clue that there is a problem.

No, but artists are shafted in this country when it comes to support, be it financial or just plain "you can do it!" motivational affirmation. Ultimately, anecdotal reminders may lead you to feel a certain way about the people you know who studied liberal arts, but don't let it affect the way you perceive all people who studied liberal arts, practice any kind of art, or don't want the "normal" path of living life through your job.
 
2009-03-10 10:31:40 AM  

seancdaug: MadAsshatter:
Absolutely terrified to step out into the real world, isn't he? I knew a guy like that in college...28 years old, 3 majors, 2 minors (in completely unrelated fields).

Meh. I got three majors in four years. No minors, though. It's easy enough to accomplish if you've got the intellectual curiosity for it. I started out going after a major in history, and found myself with enough credits towards a major in religion and English that I figured, why not go for those as well?

Ultimately, the second two majors didn't have much functional use other than as resume padding, but I learned a lot going for 'em, and it certainly didn't hurt me.

/also have a MA in history and an MLS
//working as an academic digital librarian
///because we can't all be engineers


Hey I've got no problem learning other stuff you're interested in, but paying $20,000/yr for it is a bit much. Hell you can pay Barnes and Noble's ridiculous prices and not come close to that. I see you did all that in 4 years though, so that doesn't really apply to you. This other guy had been in school for close to a decade. Think how many thousands of his (or someone else's) dollars he'd pissed away by then.
 
2009-03-10 10:38:27 AM  

MadAsshatter:
Hey I've got no problem learning other stuff you're interested in, but paying $20,000/yr for it is a bit much. Hell you can pay Barnes and Noble's ridiculous prices and not come close to that. I see you did all that in 4 years though, so that doesn't really apply to you. This other guy had been in school for close to a decade. Think how many thousands of his (or someone else's) dollars he'd pissed away by then.


Fair enough. My undergraduate school (Oberlin College) had a policy that no student could be enrolled for more than twelve semesters (six years) full-time. I actually had a friend who just barely graduated because of that. He was a smart enough guy, but he clearly didn't have the temperament for college, and managed to flunk out of every major he'd tried. For the most part, though, most of the folks I knew from school for conscientious and education-oriented. Then again, I hung out with the math majors. ;)
 
MFL
2009-03-10 11:16:37 AM  
UNC_Samurai
Our society has changed from a half-century ago, when a high-school education was sufficient for the majority of the workforce. Now, a B.A. is often not enough for some employers - liberal arts degrees became the equivalent of the old high-school diploma. I don't blame employers, because the grade school curricula often has failed to keep up with the demands of new American industries

Most small business employers are looking for work experience over college degrees. Something the current generation doesn't have as much of. The current workforce (ages 25 to 40) is overeducated and under experienced.
 
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