Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Daily Mail)   Going grocery shopping with your children? The Nanny State won't let you buy any alcohol then, because you might give it to them   ( dailymail.co.uk) divider line
    More: Asinine  
•       •       •

14821 clicks; posted to Main » on 03 Mar 2009 at 11:44 AM (8 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



234 Comments     (+0 »)
 


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | » | Newest | Show all

 
2009-03-03 12:00:03 PM  

GarySZ: reminds me of when I was in college - I was living in the 21+ dorm where you were allowed to drink and one night I tried to sign in a friend who was under 21 while carrying a 30 rack of some swill. The kid behind the desk, inflated with his front-desk "power" refused to let me sign my friend in because I had beer in my hand. The fact that I could have had 100 cans in my room didn't seem to matter.

Solution? I walked up to my room, dropped off the 30 rack and then came down to sign my friend in.

Yeah, my campus kind of sucked.



My brother went to Western Washington Univ., and I had an interesting run-in with one of their RAs. I was already on summer break, so I drove up there for a visit. My brother and his friends asked if I could go on a liquor run for them, and being the nice guy that I am, I did it. As I walked into their dorm with a full box of hooch, one of the RAs (Mormon chick) stopped me. She asked who I was staying with, and I had to give her an honest answer, since it was her job to know all the names.

"Your brother isn't 21," she said.

"Yes, but I am," I replied.

She tried to intimidate me, telling me that I would have to dump it out. I managed to calm her down, and assured her that I would take it back to my car, and that the booze wouldn't make it inside the dorm.

/We snuck it through a side door 10 minutes later.
 
2009-03-03 12:00:18 PM  
Here in Vestal/Binghamton, NY if your friends drive you to the local alcohol store, the owner will come out and ID the people in the car if you park in their lot.

/So we don't
//Nothing wrong with walking
 
2009-03-03 12:00:28 PM  

Antionne: That is what happens when you vote to let government to run your life.


I don't know if you bothered to read either the article or the thread, but "Tesco's" is a grocer, not unlike Publix or Wegmans or Ralph's in the states. It is a PRIVATE business, not a government entity.

The only "vote" that mattered was the foolish woman voting with her wallet "yea" by actually continuing the transaction in the face of mindless customer service.
 
2009-03-03 12:00:32 PM  

jshine: Klippoklondike: So, are there any reasons to go to England anymore?

Yes: the beautiful women, wonderful weather, and delicious food.


...and unsupassed dental hygene!!
 
2009-03-03 12:00:37 PM  

Farking: Apparently it is legal for a minor to drink in a bar in Wisconsin as long as their parent is with them.

/heard it somewhere


That is correct.

The establishment doesn't have to serve but they can do so if they choose.
 
2009-03-03 12:00:39 PM  
You should never sell a Daily Mail reader alcohol.
 
2009-03-03 12:00:40 PM  

proton: In NY years ago working at a Price Chopper all parties needed to be present ID when alcohol was being purchased. Have the laws changed?


Maybe that was the "law" in your store only? When I worked at Waldbaums in Queens in the mid 80s we only checked the ID of the purchaser, and then only if that person looked underage. We never stopped a parent buying beer with a child present.
 
2009-03-03 12:00:44 PM  

Farking: Texas law allows parents to provide alcohol to their own underage children in a bar or restaurant as long as the parent remains in the physical presence of the minor. However, it is against the law to provide alcohol to anyone else's underage child, even if they have their parent's permission.

/Texas too...


That seems fairly reasonable to me.
 
2009-03-03 12:01:54 PM  
If I was her, I would have just left the store without buying anything.

I'm 30 years old and currently working in upstate New York, but I have a New Jersey drivers license (class b w/ hazmat). I shop at a nearby grocery store, Hannafords, here in Hudson Falls that usually gives me crap about my id, as they rarely see a drivers license from such a far off state.

One time, the cashier, an assistant manager, and a manager spent over five minutes looking at my license and comparing it to their Holy Book of Drivers Licences, trying to figure out if it was legit or not. I had around seventy dollars in groceries on the conveyor and was trying to buy a case of Stella Artois (it was on sale for 10 bucks a case).

I grabbed my license from the manager, loudly but calmly proclaimed them to be idiots, and then left the store with my groceries unpurchased and still on the conveyor. Went to the other Hannafords four miles away, bought the same items and the cashiers there barely give my license a second glance.
 
2009-03-03 12:01:59 PM  

bubbaprog: The supermarket giant tries to stop adults buying alcohol for minors as part of its efforts to curb under-age drinking.

RTFA: This has nothing to do with a "NANNY STATE"


Wait...there's an article?
 
2009-03-03 12:02:09 PM  

Whitewabbit: news just in, the nanny state is actually a single tescos store.

just dont go into that store any you should be ok. oh, and they apologised as well. to the internets!



This.

bubbaprog: The supermarket giant tries to stop adults buying alcohol for minors as part of its efforts to curb under-age drinking.

RTFA: This has nothing to do with a "NANNY STATE"


That.

Good grief, people.
 
2009-03-03 12:02:11 PM  
I always wait till I get the little farkers home and get them schnockered so that I can concentrate on Galaga.
 
2009-03-03 12:02:14 PM  

bubbaprog: The supermarket giant tries to stop adults buying alcohol for minors as part of its efforts to curb under-age drinking.

RTFA: This has nothing to do with a "NANNY STATE"


Who was it that decided minors can't drink?
 
2009-03-03 12:02:36 PM  
i worked at a liquer store in ontario.

i have seen some pretty rediculous turn aways. full grown bearded men, with wives and children getting sent away because they dont have any ID on them. than if the wife offers her ID is unexeptable because she could be purchasing for a minor.

i understand the reasoning behind it but in alot of cases its just inconvienient for the customer and a power trip for the employee.
 
2009-03-03 12:02:37 PM  

Farking: Texas law allows parents to provide alcohol to their own underage children in a bar or restaurant as long as the parent remains in the physical presence of the minor. However, it is against the law to provide alcohol to anyone else's underage child, even if they have their parent's permission.

/Texas too...


That's pretty cool. I never knew that. Sounds like a good rule...go figure.
 
2009-03-03 12:03:00 PM  

MM0600: This is so stupid. A similar thing happened to me and my husband last year - we were both 28 at the time and they demanded to see my identification as well as his. Can the store be held responsible if an adult purchases liquor and passes it on to a minor? Their only concern should be whether or not the person paying for it is old enough.


If I was the cashier, I wouldn't have sold it to you. But my state is speshul. If I had violated the liquor laws here and sold to someone without checking ID, I get fined anywhere from $1000 to $5000, depending... plus, I would probably get fired.

I could give a shiat about the responsibility of the store.

//state laws vary
 
2009-03-03 12:05:31 PM  

proton: law


Wegmans does.
 
2009-03-03 12:05:58 PM  
Nanny state, nanny state, nanny state. What is it with that moronic meme? This was a private company refused and later apologised to serve alcohol for reasons that may have been more obvious than the time than in a typical The Daily Mail bullshiat hit piece. I'd add that alcohol licensing in the UK is far more liberal than some countries that I could choose to mention.
 
2009-03-03 12:06:00 PM  
Would like some cheese with your whine, lady?

/super stupid
 
2009-03-03 12:06:01 PM  

Slippery-Sam: i worked at a liquer store in ontario.

i have seen some pretty rediculous turn aways. full grown bearded men, with wives and children getting sent away because they dont have any ID on them.


This story must be fake.

Mormons don't drink alcohol.
 
2009-03-03 12:06:39 PM  

jshine: Klippoklondike: So, are there any reasons to go to England anymore?

Yes: the beautiful women, wonderful weather, and delicious food.


+1

Satanic_Hamster: If I was her, I would have just left the store without buying anything.

I'm 30 years old and currently working in upstate New York, but I have a New Jersey drivers license (class b w/ hazmat). I shop at a nearby grocery store, Hannafords, here in Hudson Falls that usually gives me crap about my id, as they rarely see a drivers license from such a far off state.

One time, the cashier, an assistant manager, and a manager spent over five minutes looking at my license and comparing it to their Holy Book of Drivers Licences, trying to figure out if it was legit or not. I had around seventy dollars in groceries on the conveyor and was trying to buy a case of Stella Artois (it was on sale for 10 bucks a case).

I grabbed my license from the manager, loudly but calmly proclaimed them to be idiots, and then left the store with my groceries unpurchased and still on the conveyor. Went to the other Hannafords four miles away, bought the same items and the cashiers there barely give my license a second glance.


I'm 23 and rarely get carded so I'm getting a kick out of that story. That sucks though, I hate idiots.
 
2009-03-03 12:07:56 PM  
Meh. This isn't a government issue, it's that particular Tesco being too reactionary.

The rest of England is pretty liberal when it comes to booze. People bring their kids to pubs. Hell, you could drink booze on the tube up until June last year.
 
2009-03-03 12:07:59 PM  

Lauraness: proton: law

Wegmans does.


Don't even get me started on Wegmans. I love that store, but their alcohol policy is like something out of the dark ages. The term "nanny state" is stupid, but I wouldn't hesitate to call them a nanny company. They seem like they are trying to go beyond the law to push some sort of social agenda.
 
2009-03-03 12:08:06 PM  
Is there any quality control over green lighting articles on Fark anymore?

Or are links chosen purely for their flame war potential?

I'd like the old Fark back please, the new one is placing far too much emphasis on attracting the retard demographic.

/oooh, I mentioned an Admin, so rebellious
// will Nanny Fark have to step in?
 
2009-03-03 12:08:45 PM  
NC also requires all hard alcoholic beverages be sold in an ABC store. Grocery stores can sell wine and beer, but that's it. A recipe I wanted to try called for creme de menthe in it, and I eventually ended up at a local ABC store to get it. The place was built like a well furnished exotic food store; I'd been expecting a concrete block structure with bars on the windows and drunks hanging around the front door.

/wasn't carded
//neither was my wife
///must be getting old
 
2009-03-03 12:08:50 PM  
After reading the article about 250 drunk teens wrecking a neighborhood in the UK and no one getting arrested I'd say this type of thing is obviously necessary in the UK.
 
2009-03-03 12:09:13 PM  

jshine: Yes: the beautiful women, wonderful weather, and delicious food.


Yeah, I like Italy too.
 
2009-03-03 12:09:16 PM  

Internet Superhero: I've never heard the term "nanny state" before, but it seems to describe perfectly the type of government they have over there. I'm glad I live in the USA.


The British government runs Tesco? News to me.
 
2009-03-03 12:09:19 PM  
I didn't realize {grocery stores = national government} in the UK. Next time I visit, I'm going to Sainsbury's to see Parliament in session.
 
2009-03-03 12:09:39 PM  
They don't need to go this far BUT if you choose to keep alcohol in the house, the children should be tested by the Government twice a year to make sure they aren't consuming any alcohol, IMO.
 
2009-03-03 12:10:05 PM  

GooberMcFly: Father Jack Hacket: What's the drinking age in the "land of the free" again?

19. 18 in some provinces.


Nice...

On a related note, in BC you have to be 19 to enter into a legal contract as well. Everywhere else it's 18, but here they like to be consistent for some reason, even if it's ridiculous in practice.

Moved from Ontario, wrote up a car loan for a client's kid, and wondered why it wouldn't approve on the system. Confused the hell out of me until I actually looked it up. Blows my mind, that someone could have a full time job, out of high school, entirely on their own, but couldn't sign a lease or get a credit card.

Consistent, but stupid.
 
2009-03-03 12:10:18 PM  

MDGeist: After reading the article about 250 drunk teens wrecking a neighborhood in the UK and no one getting arrested I'd say this type of thing is obviously necessary in the UK.


They're working on the case... something about following a trail of teeth left behind.
 
2009-03-03 12:10:22 PM  
necropoultryac Quote 2009-03-03 11:51:10 AM
Don't even THINK about buying condoms with your kids in tow.
Unless you're from West Virginia.

Hey, I work in West Virginia. We NEVER use condoms.
 
2009-03-03 12:10:26 PM  

sparrow794: The problem with this is what exactly? It's state law where I live... everyone present at the checkout when alcohol is being purchased must present valid ID. If someone is underage, there will be no sale.


Which is stupid. Parents with children will often bring them along while grocery shopping. It means they don't need a babysitter, they spend time with the kids, and the kids might even learn how to shop. The problem is that the rule doesn't make sense in this case. Mom is clearly buying groceries and a little alcohol.

I could see the suspicion if it was an unrelated 18 year old 17 year old buying cases of beer and a bag of chips.
 
2009-03-03 12:10:43 PM  
About a month ago while shopping for groceries at a Super Target, I picked up a bottle of wine. The girl at the checkstand not only carded me, but the person I was with. Additionally, because the checkstand girl was under 21, she had to call over a manager to finish the transaction.

I suspect that had the person I was with been under 21, I would not have been able to purchase the wine, which would have been somewhat annoying.


/purchase most of my booze at Costco
//they're not as anal
///why yes, I would like the 20 gallon keg of Kahlua to go with my 10 gallon jar of mustard
 
2009-03-03 12:11:18 PM  
I had this happen to me in Illinois. I was at a grocery store and my friends, all of age, were standing with me as I bought one case of beer. She looked and them and asked if we were together, assuming she meant the stuff we were buying was together they said no. Long story short, as we walked out together the cashier chased us out of the store screaming for someone to get the cars license plate. Gotta freak out about how many kids are going to get hammered off of one case.

People are idiots.
 
2009-03-03 12:11:37 PM  
TOTALLY OBAMA'S FAULT
 
2009-03-03 12:12:14 PM  

mmm... pancake: They don't need to go this far BUT if you choose to keep alcohol in the house, the children should be tested by the Government twice a year to make sure they aren't consuming any alcohol, IMO.


That might be a bit extreme, don'cha think? Think of the kids' privacy. Perhaps government cameras in the cabinets?
 
2009-03-03 12:12:21 PM  
img169.imageshack.usView Full Size
 
2009-03-03 12:12:41 PM  

drxym: Nanny state, nanny state, nanny state. What is it with that moronic meme? This was a private company refused and later apologised to serve alcohol for reasons that may have been more obvious than the time than in a typical The Daily Mail bullshiat hit piece. I'd add that alcohol licensing in the UK is far more liberal than some countries that I could choose to mention.


i dont know, it's a bit of a mystery to me too - seems to elicit some sort of pavlovian response in certain of our mouth breathing cousins across the pond who enjoy the sense of mislplaced sanctimonious one-upmanship they feel in their collective winkies every time they hear it because no matter how unfounded or downright spurious 'nanny state' stories are, it matters little as each one goes some small way to assuaging the nagging sense of futility they have about thier own pointless, insular lives as they get to point and laugh at a people they have never met from a country they have never visited, keptin.

/
 
2009-03-03 12:13:04 PM  

TheChemist: Internet Superhero: I've never heard the term "nanny state" before, but it seems to describe perfectly the type of government they have over there. I'm glad I live in the USA.

The British government runs Tesco? News to me.


My pitiful attempt at sarcasm. I need to study the Fark masters more.
 
2009-03-03 12:14:27 PM  
There's always one crusading nutjob cashier at the store. When I was 16, I used to buy cigarettes at the local drugstore, which was attached to a grocery store. There was one stupid biatch at the drugstore who wouldn't sell you smokes without ID. So you'd go over to the grocery store, get your smokes, and walk by the fuming biatch at the drugstore, with your cigarettes in hand, on the way out. She never learned, and it was fun to humiliate her.
 
2009-03-03 12:14:31 PM  
i.dailymail.co.ukView Full Size


i.dailymail.co.ukView Full Size


Of course she's more attractive, it's just a vibe.
 
2009-03-03 12:15:06 PM  
If a cashier suspects someone will supply alcohol to someone under 18, they are not allowed to sell it. They risk a £1000 fine to them personally and the store can risk losing their licence.

Booze being bought by people over 18 then being given to kids is a major problem and police will crack down on stores where it's known to be happening.

/fed up of chav kids with their 2 liter bottles of white lightning making some places no go areas.
 
2009-03-03 12:15:45 PM  
i wasn't allowed to buy beer in a gas station once because my underage neighbor came up and said hi to me while i was checking out.
 
2009-03-03 12:16:01 PM  

Slippery-Sam: i worked at a liquer store in ontario.

i have seen some pretty rediculous turn aways. full grown bearded men, with wives and children getting sent away because they dont have any ID on them. than if the wife offers her ID is unexeptable because she could be purchasing for a minor.

i understand the reasoning behind it but in alot of cases its just inconvienient for the customer and a power trip for the employee.


Wow. On behalf of everyone who has ever attended an Ontario public school while not high on spraypaint fumes, I apologize. We don't all talk like that, honest.

/eh
 
2009-03-03 12:16:15 PM  

WayneKerr: That might be a bit extreme, don'cha think? Think of the kids' privacy.


Privacy has nothing to do with it. Kids have a right to not be boozed up by their parents' irresponsibility.
 
2009-03-03 12:17:09 PM  

mmm... pancake: They don't need to go this far BUT if you choose to keep alcohol in the house, the children should be tested by the Government twice a year to make sure they aren't consuming any alcohol, IMO.


And then they'd earn the title "nanny state", wouldn't they? In many locations around the developed world, it's legal to let minors drink if they're in the presence of their parents/legal guardians.

Should we test them for huffing spray paint as well, if one keeps that around? And don't get me started on prescription drugs and all.
 
2009-03-03 12:17:12 PM  
I have to side with the store on this one. Farkers would be howling with scorn if some kid DWI'ed or ODed on alcohol that was bought for them with "Oh, no she doesn't have ID, but its ok, she's my daughter. You'll just have to take our word on that."
 
2009-03-03 12:18:07 PM  
In West Virginia, you can get a job as a cashier at 16 at Walmart or Kroger or wherever. However, in order to scan your beer purchases the cashier must be 18. They can take it out of your cart for you at 16, put it on the conveyor, even bag it, but they can't run it across the scanner. In the span of literally 10 seconds it can go from legal for them to touch it, illegal, and then back to legal. If you FSM forbid get in the wrong line, you have to wait for them to holler for someone old enough to scan it - you're not even allowed to do it yourself. And then you have to be 21 to drink it. Sometimes I truly weep for my state.

But yet we were one of the last to go from 18 to 21 and did it kicking and screaming.
 
Displayed 50 of 234 comments


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | » | Newest | Show all



This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking

On Twitter





Top Commented
Javascript is required to view headlines in widget.
  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report