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(London Times)   How Kindle could save the newspaper business after it was gutted by idiots posting it for free on their stupid websites   (business.timesonline.co.uk) divider line 56
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3451 clicks; posted to Geek » on 15 Feb 2009 at 3:44 AM (5 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



56 Comments   (+0 »)
   

Archived thread
 
2009-02-14 11:07:19 PM
I honestly don't see it, even though I'd welcome something similar.

The Kindle doesn't have the market saturation necessary to make such an option viable, no?

Also, this would create complicated issues with cross-platform publishing to avoid ethics concerns of forcing readers to use a proprietary device; marketing problems with maintaining an internet release (why buy a Kindle if we can just subscribe to an RSS feed from our computers?) which just suffer from the same problems newspapers and news agencies already have, and I don't think this offers a sustainable solution for local, smaller circulation newspapers.
 
2009-02-15 12:11:48 AM
CtrlAltDelete: The Kindle doesn't have the market saturation necessary to make such an option viable, no?

Probably not, although I just broke down and ordered one primarily so I could read newspapers on the go. The Kindle's largest benefit, by far, is that it has a Verizon EV-DO broadband modem built-in and you don't have to pay a monthly fee. You can literally get your latest newspaper anywhere.

They are marketing primarily to the "traveler" market, but I'm getting solely to stop the pile of newspapers I have strewn about.

I doubt it's going to be a magic device unless they get the price point to 100 dollars or less, but in a few years there may be enough collective newspaper support that the hardware cost is subsidized by content companies, like cell phones are by phone carriers.
 
2009-02-15 12:16:10 AM
Nobody can afford a Kindle.

Everybody already has a computer and an Internet connection.

The free website model will prevail.
 
2009-02-15 12:19:18 AM
News outlets never "gave away" content online. We have to sort through page after page that can be more ad than content, including ads that must be clicked before revealing any content at all!

/skip this welcome screen...
 
2009-02-15 12:52:30 AM
More after the JUMP!
 
2009-02-15 04:05:00 AM
I didn't read the article, but I assume the jist of it is that Drew is going to hell.
 
2009-02-15 04:09:21 AM
Kindle is way too expensive.. as great an idea as it is, they are asking so much money that huge chunks of their potential market ain't gonna touch 'em-- like college students who might want to put their textbooks on a kindle, or people who love newspapers and would like to carry them all on the bus to work-- but these people (by and large) aren't going to spend $300-400 and then subscription fees.

/older brother is on the development team
 
2009-02-15 05:03:31 AM
When newspapers first came to the Web, I recall that a large number of them charged for their content. You don't see that anymore.

I foresee that many companies will try to begin to reign that back in. I suspect that you'll only be able to see the synopsis of an article and/or an introductory paragraph for free. Special content like arts, travel and business may be by subscription only.

Honestly, I don't blame them. Between AdBlock, NoScript, Spybot and PeerGuardian, I hardly ever see a graphical advertisement anymore. How can you make a profit when your readers aren't even seeing your ads?

However, they need to make payment fast, easy and convenient. Traditional monthly payment methods somewhat fuqor that last item.

Hopefully, these guys will find some happy medium. I cringe at the idea of some future where most news comes from bloggers, for this simple reason alone:

i4.photobucket.com
 
2009-02-15 05:16:04 AM
As a frequent international traveler, I really dig my Kindle. Worth every penny for me.

There are a lot of factors that have farked the newspapers. Technology being number one... but has anyone else noticed how "news" isn't really news anymore? Infotainment is today's news, and it sucks.
 
2009-02-15 05:23:16 AM
I would swear we had this thread a couple days ago...
 
2009-02-15 06:10:01 AM
I love being a part of something...

/anything...
 
2009-02-15 07:23:04 AM
Kindle's too expensive.

Give me something about the same size with a touch screen instead of that stupid keyboard (so, like the Sony reader).

Then, set the price at $150 or less, or $250 or less if it also plays MP3s and has at least 64GB of built-in capacity. I'll buy it.

/ come the fark on, a 64GB USB flash drive is only $125 or so, where the fark are the high-capacity solid-state players?
// The cheapest MP3 player I can find that's big enough for an interface that would make that 64GB of MP3s navigable is $35.
/// Therefore, I should be able to buy a 64GB flash-based MP3 player for around $150-160, but a 32GB one is $250! WTF?
 
2009-02-15 07:40:01 AM
I don't see it gaining mass appeal until said masses will be able to view their page 3 girls in colour. And it is given away free.
 
2009-02-15 08:19:20 AM
The reason newspapers are losing money is because they still run printing presses. Information is information, and if you want it you will pay for it. If you can buy single issues of a newspaper on a Kindle, then that will be the breakthrough. A lot of people said the iPod would only appeal to a small group of people (mac users) and that it was too expensive. Oh, and the record companies would never agree to sell their music online, per song. Even if the Kindle isn't the next big thing, some form of it is.
 
2009-02-15 09:35:09 AM
I always thought the kindle and newspaper could make for an awesome partnership if they did it correctly. Instead of having people pay an obscene amount of money for the kindle, then a monthly subscription for the newspaper separately, what if the newspaper were to sell the kindle with a contract?

Have Amazon sell the kindle either at full market price, or for around $100 if you agree to a multi-year, $10/month contract for getting the newspaper.

The majority of the subscription fees go to the newspaper, and Amazon makes up the difference with book sales from all the people buying kindles. If that didn't net them enough money, they could sell a 1-2 line text-ad space on each page and distribute the profits from that as well between Amazon and the newspaper.
 
2009-02-15 09:55:37 AM
studebaker hoch: Nobody can afford a Kindle.

This; I'd consider buying it if it weren't upwards of $400.
 
2009-02-15 10:13:23 AM
jvrichards: As a frequent international traveler, I really dig my Kindle. Worth every penny for me.

There are a lot of factors that have farked the newspapers. Technology being number one... but has anyone else noticed how "news" isn't really news anymore? Infotainment is today's news, and it sucks.


It's called C-span there's like 3 channels of it on basic cable where I'am at. I refuse to watch CNN, FOX, or MSNBC because they're crawling with political hacks and nothing they do resembles journalism. That and if they're ideologically bent you've set yourself up for being lied to, why pray tell would a sane person who seeks truth do that? Unless they don't care about the truth at all and just get a rise out of the groupthink and drama.
 
2009-02-15 10:31:23 AM
The Kindle won't save newspapers simply because it's $400.

The only thing that will save newspapers is for them to be seen as essential.
 
2009-02-15 10:34:20 AM
I still get a paper newspaper. Why, you ask?
1) you can't get spyware or trojans from a newspaper, just a little ink on your hands.
2) You can't line a bird cage with your laptop. Well, you can, but it's stupid.
3) Newsprint is better for starting fireplace logs
4) Clipping coupons can damage your monitor
5) Works when wifi doesn't
6) Swat neighborhood cats with it
7) pad packages to Mom
8) awesome hats! (pops)
 
2009-02-15 10:54:36 AM
I'm probably always going to subscribe to at least one paper newspaper.

The Kindle doesn't interest me right now.

1. Screen size, too small for a dedicated newspaper-reader.
2. Price point
3. DRM
4. Tiny memory
5. Constantly reports back to Amazon

Some kind of e-ink display that is the size of a regular magazine and was stand-alone, for maybe $100, would be perfect. I think there should be different sizes of e-ink devices, so you can have a book reader and a reader for different content, like PDFs, magazine articles and newspapers.

Nothing really justifies the price tag this thing currently has, especially since it has so little memory... there are other e-readers that are more like $250 and support more formats, but they all have too-small screens.
 
2009-02-15 11:31:51 AM
bobbette: The Kindle doesn't interest me right now.

1. Screen size, too small for a dedicated newspaper-reader.
2. Price point
3. DRM
4. Tiny memory
5. Constantly reports back to Amazon


1, 2, 3, 5, granted. But 4? 1,500 books? How many do you need to carry with you?
 
2009-02-15 11:33:28 AM
Dinjiin: Honestly, I don't blame them. Between AdBlock, NoScript, Spybot and PeerGuardian, I hardly ever see a graphical advertisement anymore. How can you make a profit when your readers aren't even seeing your ads?

Because you aren't the average reader. Newspapers serve millions upon millions of ad impressions each week. Users with the plugins you mentioned are in the minority.

But this article doesn't make any sense. Newspaper subscription costs have never covered the cost of actual production - it's always been about the advertising.

"part of a trend that has seen most papers give away their content online in the hope of making the money back on advertising. It has proved a risky bet."

It's not a risky bet, it's the same 'bet' that newspapers have been using as their business model for decades. It's no different from print, it's just an entirely new medium with new rules. The ones that figure this out will survive. The ones who think they can keep playing by their print rules will die.

What, you think $.50 covers the cost of the ink, paper, press, delivery and reporting? Ha. Ha I say to you.
 
2009-02-15 11:43:40 AM
$14 a month for the NYT? Or should I say, $14 for a digital version that can be infinitely reproduced at essentially zero cost to them? I'd pay $5, tops.

FTFA: "If they don't want to pay, screw them; we don't need them"

marketing FAIL
 
2009-02-15 11:59:02 AM
Newspapers started having problems when they began featuring less news and started featuring more content. No one's that interested in "human interest" stories that are out of touch with humanity and (surprise, surprise) not interesting. The heroic tales of people overcoming adversity are eclipsed daily by the struggles of others with burdens that are 100 times greater than the ones that frame the ads for all the going out of business sales.

No one's that interested in reading about the latest consumer trend when for one thing said consumer trend doesn't exist and for another, the consumer trend is for a product that unappealing due to the price tag.
 
2009-02-15 12:10:13 PM
Bugs_Bunny_Practiced_Psychological_Warfare: Newspapers started having problems when they began featuring less news and started featuring more content. No one's that interested in "human interest" stories that are out of touch with humanity and (surprise, surprise) not interesting. The heroic tales of people overcoming adversity are eclipsed daily by the struggles of others with burdens that are 100 times greater than the ones that frame the ads for all the going out of business sales.

No one's that interested in reading about the latest consumer trend when for one thing said consumer trend doesn't exist and for another, the consumer trend is for a product that unappealing due to the price tag.


Decades of surveys and readership studies done by thousands of different organizations disagree with you strongly. In fact, you couldn't be more wrong about newspaper readership if you tried.

Believe it or not, human interest stories always top the list of things readers in a market wish for more of in their local newspaper.

Journalists don't particularly enjoy them though.
 
2009-02-15 12:18:45 PM
If newspapers are relying on the Kindle, they're doomed. They've sold 500,000 of them since the launch. Respectable? Maybe. But, just for contrast because I read this figure Friday, Apple sold 4.4 million iPhones in their recent quarter. And iPhone users can and do read newspapers, eBooks, browse the internet, look at video, listen to music, check the weather, and some of them even play games.

Statistically, the Kindle is irrelevant. I think it's actually very cool looking. But if you're gonna have reduced reading area to begin with, it's really not a great device being that it's single-purpose only at $400.
 
2009-02-15 12:32:29 PM
Yeah, everybody says the Kindle's too expensive. But if so, how come it's been sold out constantly since it was first introduced? Obviously there's more than enough demand at the current price.

My wife reads constantly. She bought one over a year ago, and recently told me she'd already made back the $400 price just in the lower prices of Kindle e-books. THAT's the Kindle's market. Not you and me.
 
2009-02-15 12:35:13 PM
Well, if it's sold out constantly, and they've only sold 500,000, then it's a major production issue either with disastrous manufacturing, or downplayed expectations. Either way, it defines a niche market.
 
2009-02-15 01:32:56 PM
studebaker hoch: The free website model will prevail.

And eventually, all the free website model will offer is worthless information, like studebaker hoch's opinions
 
2009-02-15 01:59:36 PM
cxjohn: Well, if it's sold out constantly, and they've only sold 500,000, then it's a major production issue either with disastrous manufacturing, or downplayed expectations. Either way, it defines a niche market.

The ipod only sold about 376,000 units in it's first year. An Apple mp3 player defines a niche market?
 
2009-02-15 02:03:37 PM
I actually use Calibre to download a few newspapers to my Sony PRS-505. It just makes it easier than carrying around a bulky newspaper and flipping around. I would really, really like to get a sub to the Wall Street Journal but it's $99, the same as the print version, so screw it. I'll keep downloading the free ones.

Beowoolfie: Yeah, everybody says the Kindle's too expensive. But if so, how come it's been sold out constantly since it was first introduced? Obviously there's more than enough demand at the current price.

Because of Amazon following Nintendo's lead by artificially choking the supply.

That said, an e-reader really is a great buy for bookworms. I have saved the cost many times over of my PRS-505 with the massive amount of public domain books.
 
2009-02-15 02:29:24 PM
cxjohn: Statistically, the Kindle is irrelevant. I think it's actually very cool looking. But if you're gonna have reduced reading area to begin with, it's really not a great device being that it's single-purpose only at $400.

i'm not a fan of the kindle, but 500,000 is hardly irrelevant. Remembe,r the kindle is part of the BOOK world not the cellphone world. More people use cellphones than read books.

If a book sells 100,000 copies that is a pretty big deal. 500,000 potential customers is not irrelvant.
 
2009-02-15 02:32:37 PM
Beowoolfie:

My wife reads constantly. She bought one over a year ago, and recently told me she'd already made back the $400 price just in the lower prices of Kindle e-books. THAT's the Kindle's market. Not you and me.


Sounds like bullshiat to me, unless your wife is (no offense) a really lazy book buyer or subscribes to tons of newspapers... or like constantly reads expensive undergrad textbooks.

Kindle books are 10 bucks a piece. Amazon books tend to be between 10 and 13 dollars new and like 5 bucks used (1 buck plus 4 shipping).
 
2009-02-15 02:46:16 PM
The reason newspapers are losing money is because they still run printing presses. Information is information, and if you want it you will pay for it. If you can buy single issues of a newspaper on a Kindle, then that will be the breakthrough. A lot of people said the iPod would only appeal to a small group of people (mac users) and that it was too expensive. Oh, and the record companies would never agree to sell their music online, per song. Even if the Kindle isn't the next big thing, some form of it is.

I disagree. In large part, the reason Newspapers are falling out of favor and losing money is that they are out of date the minute they leave printing floor, if not sooner.

In an age where information comes fast and furious, perhaps too much so, an actual printed paper lags behind. Take for example the small microcosm of sports reporting. In newspapers, I still see scores sometimes not included because they are "Night" games, so they finished too late for the result to be included.

Meanwhile ESPN.com allows you to follow scores literally up to the minute, and they provide video highlights, a written synopsis, and more stats than you could ever want.

Weather is the same way. The print Newspaper has one page that shows the weather forecast. On TV or online you can get more timely updates, especially in the case of a severe weather warning. The newspaper might warn of Tornadoes, but it can't possibly warn you of them as they occur.

All of these flaws, and newspapers still require me to pay for them. Meanwhile I pay one flat fee for internet access to get all sorts of content that can cover what the newspaper does. I'm not saying the newspaper is useless, but for people of my generation it's just not what we are used to, we go online for information, or perhaps TV.

The kindle isn't going to change that in the least.
 
2009-02-15 03:09:15 PM
studebaker hoch: Nobody can afford a Kindle.

Everybody already has a computer and an Internet connection.

The free website model will prevail.




That attitude sounds familiar:

...Deal also praised that fact that the iPod fits into Apple's digital hub strategy. "However, I question the company's ability to sell into a tight consumer market right now at the iPod's current price..."

...The iPod has "good features, but this is a pretty competitive category," Baker said. "The question is whether people want that robust of a feature set with that high of a price..."


From Apple's iPod spurs mixed reactions, October 23rd 2001.
 
2009-02-15 04:03:18 PM
Seems 90% of the content of dead tree newspapers is aimed at the upper-middle class and the overclass anyway, whose eyeballs the advertisers especially covet. (It didn't always be that way; many newspapers used to address and advocate working class issues.)

It's no wonder that the circulation numbers of the local Daily Fishwrap have steadily fallen over the years. It just doesn't speak to the interests of the vast majority of people.
 
2009-02-15 04:14:40 PM
Yeah I can see where this is going..
www.mainemasonrystove.com
/hot...soon
 
2009-02-15 04:38:12 PM
Small local papers will not die. All this noise is from the national and regional papers.

The locals need to know about their school budget, where the garage sales are, when leaf pickup is scheduled, public notices, etc. Our local paper is totally supported by the ad space it sells. Most are.
 
2009-02-15 04:40:49 PM
Kindle-like devices will become mainstream eventually.. but not until they're significantly cheaper ($50 to $150) and do color. As it stands right now, I see the potential of the device but it's not an attractive enough option to lure me away from my bulky full-color tomes.

//College student, would LOVE for this to come to fruition.
 
2009-02-15 04:53:06 PM
Dinjiin: Hopefully, these guys will find some happy medium. I cringe at the idea of some future where most news comes from bloggers

I was just reading an interesting op ed piece the other day (yes, in a real printed newspaper) about the future of news outlets of all kinds versus blogging and the like. It was an interesting point that the "news" you see on blogs are often linked to things like the AP wires and regular news outlets. I really wonder if we could do without some kind of tradiitonal news reporting. Even in the rather mild area of sports, which blogger is going to get the locker room credentials? I can't even imagine what a White House press conference would look like if the news outlets just one day went away.
 
2009-02-15 05:03:59 PM
I saw a Kindle in real life once a year ago.

Never saw another one again.
 
2009-02-15 05:25:47 PM
My wife is an avid reader. She bought a Kindle about 8 months ago and loves it. What you basement dwellers are missing is that most people who read a lot do not like a backlit display. The kindle is reflective and is much easier on the eyes and brain than a laptop for someone who actually reads more than a few paragraphs at a time.

Cost savings on books is significant, most new releases are hardcover and cost about $26, the kindle version is $9. She can breeze through a book in a couple days, so the cost savings is real for her. Amazon severely underestimated the market- just like many of you are doing, this is why they've been back ordered for months.

I haven't tried the available newspapers, but it would seem to be a good business model.
 
2009-02-15 05:56:58 PM
Bill Frist: If a book sells 100,000 copies that is a pretty big deal. 500,000 potential customers is not irrelvant.

Actually, it's a big deal if a book sells 5K copies. Sell 35K in a month and you're on the NYT bestseller list.

/ Wife is book editor, friends are authors
 
2009-02-15 06:19:14 PM
studebaker hoch: Nobody can afford a Kindle.

Everybody already has a computer and an Internet connection.

The free website model will prevail.


You mean the free website with viruses that destroy files and make you reformat.

/addblock, noscript, blah blah blah
/how about website providers removing ads or at least guaranteeing the safety of their content BEFORE posting rather than after thousands of complaints about infections
 
2009-02-15 06:27:35 PM
Why would a $200 device that requires subscription fees replace a 50 cent newspaper?

I have a feeling that newspapers are going to have to switch to a public radio model to survive down the road, or get government assistance.

I know my college paper wouldn't exist if it weren't 50% supported by state funds. It blows, and no one would ever pay for it. They also can't sell enough advertising to justify the measly 12-16 pages they cobble together twice a week.
 
2009-02-15 06:32:10 PM
Newspapers also rely to much on the AP, making everyone read like USA Today, which just a decade ago was panned for how horrid it was. The left bias has also disenchanted their primary market: older, more educated, wealthier people.

It would be like MTV trying to cater to the AARP crowd. Not going to happen.
 
2009-02-15 06:35:50 PM
i'm beginning to feel that people are buying kindles to get back to what the web was supposed to be.

maybe not. but not a lot of active content in books. just well organized information easily got at.
 
2009-02-15 07:28:43 PM
kradio: If you can buy single issues of a newspaper on a Kindle, then that will be the breakthrough.

Uh, you can. Single issue of NYT is $.75. Like someone else said, they're seriously overcharging for the monthly rate, but on a lazy Sunday now and then I've bought a single issue and it's a great way to read the NYT.

And Beowoolfie speaks the truth. If you only read a couple of books and newspapers a year, the Kindle isn't for you. But if you read a few a month you'll make your money back in savings in no time.

Also, e-ink > backlit display. Period.
 
2009-02-15 08:51:43 PM
I wonder if they will figure out how to combine an e-ink display with a backlit LCD display so that if there is no motion on the screen currently, or just a blinking cursor perhaps, then the display won't suck power. And if there's no blinking cursor at all (you're just reading a web page) then the CPU can shut down to a state of simply waiting for the user to do something. Seems like that would integrate best with existing technology.
 
2009-02-15 09:06:33 PM
Terrified Asexual Forcemeat: I wonder if they will figure out how to combine an e-ink display with a backlit LCD display so that if there is no motion on the screen currently, or just a blinking cursor perhaps, then the display won't suck power. And if there's no blinking cursor at all (you're just reading a web page) then the CPU can shut down to a state of simply waiting for the user to do something. Seems like that would integrate best with existing technology.

Just going to mention before you lay copyright to this: I was thinking about this yesterday while reading the Economist article on e-paper.
 
2009-02-15 09:36:30 PM
Mad_Radhu

That attitude sounds familiar:

...Deal also praised that fact that the iPod fits into Apple's digital hub strategy. "However, I question the company's ability to sell into a tight consumer market right now at the iPod's current price..."

...The iPod has "good features, but this is a pretty competitive category," Baker said. "The question is whether people want that robust of a feature set with that high of a price..."

From Apple's iPod spurs mixed reactions, October 23rd 2001.


Two thoughts:

1) the iPod had a slick marketing campaign. I've never once seen an ad for a Kindle. Anywhere.

2) youngsters (people who spend money) want to listen to digital music. Oldsters (people who save money) still like newspapers.

You're hitting the wrong demographic with the Kindle, and in the wrong way.
 
2009-02-15 09:38:24 PM
ZipSplat: Terrified Asexual Forcemeat: I wonder if they will figure out how to combine an e-ink display with a backlit LCD display so that if there is no motion on the screen currently, or just a blinking cursor perhaps, then the display won't suck power. And if there's no blinking cursor at all (you're just reading a web page) then the CPU can shut down to a state of simply waiting for the user to do something. Seems like that would integrate best with existing technology.

Just going to mention before you lay copyright to this: I was thinking about this yesterday while reading the Economist article on e-paper.


It does seem like a pretty obvious idea with a lot of benefits, which is probably being hushed up by the people working on getting it patented and mass-produced.

How about this: a regular laptop with all the normal bits, but, you can also pop the screen off the hinge and carry it around, and then it switches to e-paper mode until you return it to the base.
 
2009-02-15 09:39:03 PM
The biggest problem I see with the Kindle is the small screen size.

Like reading a book on an iPhone.

Make it big enough to show two full book pages and it will be fun. But then, all you've done is build a black and white laptop with proprietary everything.

Screw that.

I can read Google news for free.
 
2009-02-16 12:58:45 AM
Terrified Asexual Forcemeat: ZipSplat: Terrified Asexual Forcemeat: I wonder if they will figure out how to combine an e-ink display with a backlit LCD display so that if there is no motion on the screen currently, or just a blinking cursor perhaps, then the display won't suck power. And if there's no blinking cursor at all (you're just reading a web page) then the CPU can shut down to a state of simply waiting for the user to do something. Seems like that would integrate best with existing technology.

Just going to mention before you lay copyright to this: I was thinking about this yesterday while reading the Economist article on e-paper.

It does seem like a pretty obvious idea with a lot of benefits, which is probably being hushed up by the people working on getting it patented and mass-produced.

How about this: a regular laptop with all the normal bits, but, you can also pop the screen off the hinge and carry it around, and then it switches to e-paper mode until you return it to the base.


I like it. But I'd take one of these instead any day:

arvino.typepad.com
 
2009-02-16 10:55:51 AM
My understanding is that Amazon has been backlogged on Kindle orders pretty much since they released it. For everyone saying it's too expensive, the market is currently saying that it's not, and Amazon isn't going to make any substantial changes to their business model or pricing until they have excess inventory sitting around for a while.

Having said that, I concur with many posters here, that I personally won't buy a Kindle or Sony reader until the price drops to something I consider to be more reasonable.
 
2009-02-16 02:04:06 PM
PoopStain: CtrlAltDelete: The Kindle doesn't have the market saturation necessary to make such an option viable, no?

Probably not, although I just broke down and ordered one primarily so I could read newspapers on the go. The Kindle's largest benefit, by far, is that it has a Verizon EV-DO broadband modem built-in and you don't have to pay a monthly fee. You can literally get your latest newspaper anywhere.

They are marketing primarily to the "traveler" market, but I'm getting solely to stop the pile of newspapers I have strewn about.

I doubt it's going to be a magic device unless they get the price point to 100 dollars or less, but in a few years there may be enough collective newspaper support that the hardware cost is subsidized by content companies, like cell phones are by phone carriers.


Given that CNN is playing endlessly in airports, every hotel has cnn in their free cable, almost everything I own can connect to a wifi network and browse the internet, I wish my laptop would generate its own blackhole and annihilate itself, and lastly if something REALLY important happens my parents call to ask if I'm okay on my cell. I'm already facing an information glut. I have a stack of journal articles now 19 inches tall to read (hey folks, STOP PUBLISHING FOR 6 MONTHS WILL YA? Some of us have too much crap to do already) why exactly do I need another device that duplicates the functionality of everything from my cell phone to PSP (oh lord how I love thee o tiny time waster -- best thing ever for the scientist on the weekend).

...

Now, if I could get a device that'd show pdf files (journal articles) and let me select sections, annoate and save the annotations with the specific selected text. The yes, I'd love that.

And I'd like a free one too.
 
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