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(BBC)   Teacher tells children the truth about Santa Claus. (Warning: spoiler in article)   (news.bbc.co.uk) divider line 319
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13083 clicks; posted to Main » on 11 Dec 2008 at 10:12 PM (5 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2008-12-11 11:55:37 PM
tortilla burger: Santa is a homosexual. That's the big secret.

Obviously he likes to pitch, squeezing down chimneys and all.
 
2008-12-11 11:55:58 PM
jack21221
Aunt Crabby: own values and subjective judgment

...she explained reality. Reality =/= "values and subjective judgment.

Her decision that that particular subject must be fully explained at that particular time regardless of the parents wishes is a value judgment. If it were a part of the curriculum or relevant to the school work, It would be different. Since Santa is not a part of the lesson plan, she could say nothing in deference to the parents' personal choice. They were only 7 years old. If it were high school, it would be different.

dreadlocksFTW

I get it. It's a game. Fun. The people responsible for education our children are also responsible for throwing in some lies and expecting them to figure out the difference when their brains are still developing. Tradition is fun!

She isn't responsible for anything one way or another. That's the point of respecting the parents' wishes. She can say nothing or ask the "what do you think?" question. That's not a lie. That's knowing she is not the parent and they are only 7.

It's about respecting the parents.

Even if Santa serves no purpose whatsoever

There you go. Nothing needs to be said after that.

Well, I think the point about who gets to make the decision about what is right to tell children of that age is valid, especially with very young children. It's not her call. As long as the parents are not abusive or harming the child, parents have the right to raise their children as they see fit. If you really think telling children Santa is real is child abuse, then I hope you never find out what real abuse is.


Do you really think the state need to protect children from Santa? Talk about your "nanny state".
 
2008-12-11 11:56:07 PM
The Icelander:
Ah, very nice. If they're ready to stop believing, at some point their answers won't make sense anymore. And if they're not, they'll just say "It's MAGIC!"


Yeah that's pretty much my position on the matter. I'm not sure if you're being sarcastic
 
2008-12-11 11:58:10 PM
Cyberluddite: Well, at least she she didn't let the cat out of the bag about that whole Jesus thing.

There is a subtle distinction between Santa and Jesus.

Jesus, according to most historians, did in fact exist. It's his supposed divinity that's controversy.
 
2008-12-11 11:58:11 PM
When did we get this feature "Too many nested em/i tags, removing extra"? It's annoying if you want more than one block of italics.

Sorry.
 
2008-12-11 11:58:13 PM
Hiro's Protagonist: So you will do the same stuff for your kid? You've said that you will not lie, because you want to have the same kind of relationship you had with your parents (I know it's a grey area)

I'm not going to pretend there's a Santa Claus, if that's what you're asking.

I think baking cookies together, and then eating them with some hot cocoa and listening to Christmas carols would be nice. The next couple days are going to be draining for everybody, so it will be nice to relax that night.
 
2008-12-11 11:58:47 PM
The Icelander: good, magic. same damn thing, neither exist.

Hiro's Protagonist; i just remebered a great example. i have a buddy that said he figured it out at about 3 or 4 on his own. he got to school and was surprised to find, everyone still belived in santa... so at 5, he looked around the room, saw how pumped everyone was about santa comes, and decicde it would be wrong for him to ruin it on us. he's one cynical bastard.. lol
 
2008-12-12 12:01:13 AM
DanRankin: wow... fark the god bullshiat ppl, whats wrong with a kid growing up beliving there might be some good or magic in the world? this shiathole starts to suck pretty quick sortly after you realize santa isnt real anyway.

Nice to meet a fellow human here. How ya doin?

The Icelander: JesusTheChrist: We're essentially on the same page on that one. I just don't think it's the teacher's place to dispel the Santa myth, even when directly asked.

I have to admit that it would be difficult for me to say what I'd do in that situation. At 7, at least one of the kids in the class knows the truth. Do you perpetuate the myth or do you tell that kid "adults will lie to kids" or do you tell that kid "adults don't want to discuss difficult subjects that might hurt people's feelings."

Makes me glad I'm not a teacher.


I am a teacher. And, this comes up not just with Santa but a whole host of other things (Do you think my writing is good, teacher? Do you think I'm smart? Do you think I'd make a good architect/doctor/whatever?

I've always taught my kids (and other teachers, now that I teach teachers) that it's never cool to disturb someone else's belief system when it's not within the curriculum. If you're teaching astrophysics, you are going to disturb the young Earth creationists, for sure. But one need not go after their sense of worth or tell them they're stupid or ugly (if if they are - or one believes they are).

It's very hard to keep one's own personal beliefs out of the classroom (impossible, I suppose), but it must be kept to a minimum. "Find out on your own" is one of the best things any student was ever told.

Teachers are not fonts of knowledge on every subject (especially grade school teachers).

Myths beliefs that people hold truer than true - and for a reason. Freud didn't "believe in" Oedipus - but it was part of his thinking - so people will hold out Freudian doctrine as true. If the curriculum is psychology - then what would be "the truth" about Freud? It's a very complex subject.

Do our ancestors still exist in some way? My family has its beliefs - yours has its beliefs. It's all myth - personal identity, looked at from one point of view, is a MYTH - but it's not the role of a grade school teacher to lead people through that labyrinth.

It's best done when one is ready, and often done alone. Those who don't do it aren't believing "lies," they're believing what they are able.
 
2008-12-12 12:02:48 AM
Aunt Crabby: Her decision that that particular subject must be fully explained at that particular time regardless of the parents wishes is a value judgment

And if a student asks how old the universe is? Can a teacher respond "13.7 billion years" even if they're not in science class? What if the parents' wishes are that the child is to believe the universe is only 6,000 years old? Was a cultural line crossed?

How would this be different than Santa?

In fact, one could argue that a BIGGER line has been crossed in my example, because the belief that the world is only 6,000 years old is a religious belief, where telling kids there is a Santa is just a cultural tradition.
 
2008-12-12 12:03:30 AM
www.gawker.com

/Been there.
//Ron & Fez, noon to three.
 
2008-12-12 12:04:31 AM
Aunt Crabby: Do you really think the state need to protect children from Santa? Talk about your "nanny state".

Aww man. That would have been a killer argument! Except I never advocated the state protecting children from Santa. I never advocated teachers telling children about Santa. The only thing I even implied is that it is not a firable offense. Oops.
 
2008-12-12 12:05:19 AM
The United States is a fictional entity that would cease to exist if people didn't believe in it. And some people's beliefs in this regard might even matter more than others.

The entire social fabric, social contract theory is a LIE.

But, perhaps, a needed one.
 
2008-12-12 12:07:10 AM
Atypical Person Reading Fark; good. not happy, but good. yourself?
 
2008-12-12 12:07:53 AM
JesusTheChrist: Proctologist Iggy Poop: JesusTheChrist: If it's that important to some of you, why aren't you in front of elementary schools holding up signs with the truth?

Recycled entry of mine from recent Fark PS contest: "Theme, Being Terrorized by Agnostic Extremists."

ROTFLMAO

Did it win? Link to contest?


No link, sorry. Took third place, with 65 votes. I'm no good at all at anything technical except Photoshop.
 
2008-12-12 12:09:49 AM
dreadlocksFTW; i'll agree with not firing her, but she should atleast get a serious "what the fark?"
 
2008-12-12 12:11:48 AM
jack21221: Aunt Crabby: Her decision that that particular subject must be fully explained at that particular time regardless of the parents wishes is a value judgment

And if a student asks how old the universe is? Can a teacher respond "13.7 billion years" even if they're not in science class? What if the parents' wishes are that the child is to believe the universe is only 6,000 years old? Was a cultural line crossed?

How would this be different than Santa?

In fact, one could argue that a BIGGER line has been crossed in my example, because the belief that the world is only 6,000 years old is a religious belief, where telling kids there is a Santa is just a cultural tradition.


All of this is governed by law and Ed Code - not to mention federal, local and state boards of education (edumacation if it's federal).

If you are hired to teach science, there are clear guidelines in every state that I know of regarding what the dogma is to be - you don't get to teach that the Earth is 6000 years old unless your state legislature commands it (and some do, amazingly).

If you're teaching six year olds, it shouldn't come up - it's not part of the curriculum anywhere in the U.S. or Canada at that age (and certainly not in Mejico, either).

Why was the Civil War fought? Was Lincoln actually a racist? What do you make of the fact that Thomas Jefferson owned black people? The Founding Fathers counted blacks as fractional humans. Only some of that is in the pre-college curriculum in California, Oregon, Washington, HI and other states I travel to for these damn curriculum/accreditation conferences.

I think they're ready for discussions of that nature by middle school, regardless of what their parents think. The process by which this is all decided includes many, many interests (and lots of teachers).

But nowhere, that I know of, does any state elementary curriculum say a teacher is to dispel the myths of Justice, Patriotism, Santa, Jesus, or anything else. Not till high school.
 
2008-12-12 12:12:02 AM
DanRankin: dreadlocksFTW; i'll agree with not firing her, but she should atleast get a serious "what the fark?"

I'll agree with that and perhaps add she should be limited in what assignments she can take in the future (i.e. nothing younger than 4th grade)
 
2008-12-12 12:12:45 AM
DanRankin: Atypical Person Reading Fark; good. not happy, but good. yourself?

I'm good. And reasonably happy tonight. Hope you're happy (or warm and cozy, at least).
 
2008-12-12 12:15:36 AM
JesterGirl: Cyberluddite: Well, at least she she didn't let the cat out of the bag about that whole Jesus thing.
I don't care how long this thread goes on for but THIS post WINS... Hands Down... Thank you.

themuttsnuts.files.wordpress.com


/I'm outta here
 
2008-12-12 12:15:42 AM
People that lies to their kids in harmful ways SHOULD FACE FREAKING JAIL TIME.

This rules should apply to Family, School, and everything else:

- No religious teaching until 15. You ain't adult enough to fark? You are not adult enough to have your brain farked either.
- No semi-religious and religious adaptations either. Santa Claus is to Christianity what Vaseline is to Anal Rape.
- No political brainwashing BEFORE History classes.

/Slashies.
 
2008-12-12 12:17:33 AM
tortilla burger: Santa is a homosexual. That's the big secret.

Which means that Mrs. Claus is his "beard?" Now I'm more confused than ever!
 
2008-12-12 12:17:34 AM
DanRankin: dreadlocksFTW; i'll agree with not firing her, but she should atleast get a serious "what the fark?"

I wouldn't object to that for her or other teachers if it's out of CONTEXT. Like if a teacher is like, hey kids....2+2 is 4 AND SANTA IS A LIE!!!

However if a kid comes up to her and asks, whats the deal with Santa....she's completely encouraged to be honest.
 
2008-12-12 12:17:53 AM
JesusTheChrist; fine buy me. anyone figure out wtf a "supply teacher" is? is that the UK term for a sub?

/ 2 or 3 years ago my lil brothers "religion teacher" (sunday school, thing..) told the class there was no santa. they where about 6-7 years old.
//irony maybe? depends what ya belive i guess.
///my old man still refuses to call her anything but "the Grinch." ever to her face. lol.
////uppity god biatch. heh.
 
2008-12-12 12:18:02 AM
Atypical Person Reading Fark: If you're teaching six year olds, it shouldn't come up - it's not part of the curriculum anywhere in the U.S. or Canada at that age (and certainly not in Mejico, either).

And if the child brings it up? Should a teacher be fired for stating the universe is 13.7 billion years old?

You side-stepped the question.

Children do ask these kind of "big questions." I remember in 4th grade asking my teacher what the world would be like in the year 8,000. She responded "That's a great question, I wish I knew."

Louis CK has a pretty funny joke about his daughter asking questions about the sun. She asks if it will shine forever, and he says "No, one day it's going to explode." His daughter starts crying.

So, I go back to my previous scenario. A seven year old child asks their elementary school teacher, not during science class, "How old is the Earth?" Or, "How old is the Sun?" Or even "Are there aliens?"

All of those are questions about reality which are, in my opinion, within the scope of an educator to answer.
 
2008-12-12 12:21:04 AM
DanRankin: JesusTheChrist; fine buy me. anyone figure out wtf a "supply teacher" is? is that the UK term for a sub?

I believe that is correct. Which is why I think limiting her assignments is acceptable. Even if it is just limiting them by not allowing her to go back to that school.
 
2008-12-12 12:21:10 AM
Atypical Person Reading Fark; well, its warm in here, the powers on, the freezing rain aint leaking in, and i've been fed. i cant complain, i'm just not happy with out whiskey. lol.
 
2008-12-12 12:21:57 AM
jack21221
"And if a student asks how old the universe is? Can a teacher respond "13.7 billion years" even if they're not in science class? What if the parents' wishes are that the child is to believe the universe is only 6,000 years old? Was a cultural line crossed?

How would this be different than Santa?"

Well, I honestly think a good number of first and second grade grade teachers would say "very old" or even "I don't know". Even if the right answer wre given, will the child burst into tears, and spend all night crying at home saying mom and dad lied about the age of the Earth? It's not really the same. I submit to many families with a 7 year old, Santa is a bigger issue in that child's life than the age of the Earth.

"In fact, one could argue that a BIGGER line has been crossed in my example, because the belief that the world is only 6,000 years old is a religious belief, where telling kids there is a Santa is just a cultural tradition."

I don't think that religion is being more important than culture, but parents who are very religious can send their children to religious schools. That is their right as parents. Older children should have a certain exposure to science because when they develop critical thinking skills (after they stop believing in Santa on their own) students need to be trained in how to use specific tools such as the scientific method. The age of the child does matter.

dreadlocksFTW
Aunt Crabby: Do you really think the state need to protect children from Santa? Talk about your "nanny state".

"Aww man. That would have been a killer argument! Except I never advocated the state protecting children from Santa. I never advocated teachers telling children about Santa. The only thing I even implied is that it is not a firable offense. Oops."

Then we agree on the last part, as in my original post I said she should not be fired but that she was wrong and should not do it again. However, your sarcastic responses to me implied you think she had some sort of obligation to tell that particular truth at that particular time or else be part of some big dread lie that would crush their tiny young minds for all time. I may have taken it wrong. Sarcasm is hard to respond to accurately because your argument is implied. :)
 
2008-12-12 12:22:12 AM
jack21221: So, I go back to my previous scenario. A seven year old child asks their elementary school teacher, not during science class, "How old is the Earth?" Or, "How old is the Sun?" Or even "Are there aliens?"

Those have nothing to do with what we're talking about, but you're more than welcome to ask your parents.
 
2008-12-12 12:22:58 AM
FTFA: "A teacher has been banned from a primary school after telling children Father Christmas does not exist."

Banned, not fired.

If she normally teaches older students, perhaps getting banned from teaching in primary schools was her intention in the first place.

/ the whole Santa thing is a conspiracy
// worn a tinfoil hat since kindergarten
 
2008-12-12 12:24:17 AM
DanRankin: Atypical Person Reading Fark; well, its warm in here, the powers on, the freezing rain aint leaking in, and i've been fed. i cant complain, i'm just not happy with out whiskey. lol.

Well, yea.
 
2008-12-12 12:24:17 AM
kyleaugustus: I think the revelation alone to children that there is no Santa Claus is singularly to large for them to take into perspective. Most kids are too young to work through such information to any realization beyond what they are told. They need to know that although his *magic* doesn't exist, they have family that care about them enough to take on the burden of bringing mystery to their life and giving them gifts unlike what they see throughout the rest of the year.

/either that or the parents are caving to societal pressure to dump gobs of money on presents for the little buggers.


Ummm... Am I the only child (probably not) who had even an ounce of logic? I mean, I started thinking around my 5th birthday (january 2nd, actually) about how Santa managed to get around to 6 billion (known as kagillion in my childhood) peoples homes in a single night, at the same time (12:00). I knew cloning was bad at the time, and that rather ruled that out. I knew you couldn't move faster than light (I tried) so I ruled that out too. So eventually, as the list ran on, I ran out of ideas, and thus, decided that Santa either does not exist, or he is an ass for not showing the general human race the basic workings of magic for the prosperiety of all.
/Anyways, that my childhood story for the day!
 
2008-12-12 12:26:01 AM
well, the only thing that came to me when i read it, Jesus, was "if thats not a sub, wtf are they teaching these poor kids?" lol.
 
2008-12-12 12:27:17 AM
DanRankin: well, the only thing that came to me when i read it, Jesus, was "if thats not a sub, wtf are they teaching these poor kids?" lol.

Where's the supply-side jesus pic when I need it?
 
2008-12-12 12:28:43 AM
Aunt Crabby: I don't think that religion is being more important than culture, but parents who are very religious can send their children to religious schools.

Bingo.

Except I went to a catholic high school

And I was taught evolution and a 13 billion year old universe model . . .
 
2008-12-12 12:31:55 AM
JesusTheChrist:
Those have nothing to do with what we're talking about, but you're more than welcome to ask your parents.


Actually, they do. There is no Santa, and the Sun is approximately 4.6 billion years old. These are both matters of reality. These are both things which parents might not want their children to know.

It's a very good analogy.

Aunt Crabby: Older children should have a certain exposure to science because when they develop critical thinking skills

I was a huge fan of Carl Sagan's series Cosmos when I was in my first few years of elementary school. My grandmother recalls that I was telling her what a googol is when I was 5. She asked me how I knew that, and I responded "I always knew that," so she started calling me "an old soul." In reality, Carl Sagan had taught me what a googol is.

Anyway, I think you're dead wrong in thinking that science, critical thinking, and the scientific method is only for older kids. Kids are scientists by nature! They experiment, disassemble, engineer, hypothesize, and interrogate nature more vigorously than most teens and adults do.

To say they aren't ready for the scientific method is lunacy.
 
2008-12-12 12:34:23 AM
Possible naughty, not nice, link:

http://www.myspace.com/pilsnerspicks

My own selection of Xmas music (and comedy routines) can be found here. I don't know exactly what Fark's policy on this is, but I hope that Drew & Co. will give me a pass and not issue me a time-out (coal in my stocking).

Who knows, Drew might even like them himself!

If this doesn't work, the page is also reachable through my Fark Profile.

All of these are great... but the highlight is "Scrooge" by Lord Buckley. Dickens wasted a lot of paper; why not slam the whole story down into nine minutes of Hipster Jive, and act all the parts out yourself (complete with sound effects?)
 
2008-12-12 12:34:24 AM
jack21221: Actually, they do.

No, they don't. You said the child was asking outside of science class.
 
2008-12-12 12:38:52 AM
Aunt Crabby: your sarcastic responses to me implied you think she had some sort of obligation to tell that particular truth at that particular time or else be part of some big dread lie that would crush their tiny young minds for all time. I may have taken it wrong.

Bingo.
 
2008-12-12 12:39:55 AM
jack21221: There is no Santa, and the Sun is approximately 4.6 billion years old

I thought the Earth was 4.6 billion y o
 
2008-12-12 12:41:16 AM
hienekenftw: Aunt Crabby: I don't think that religion is being more important than culture, but parents who are very religious can send their children to religious schools.

Bingo.

Except I went to a catholic high school

And I was taught evolution and a 13 billion year old universe model . . .


And I was taught that Genesis was a metaphor

By a nun

Who later quit the nunnery to run away with a man

And she was about 75.
 
2008-12-12 12:42:57 AM
hienekenftw: jack21221: There is no Santa, and the Sun is approximately 4.6 billion years old

I thought the Earth was 4.6 billion y o


Um, try 6,000. You're way off!
 
2008-12-12 12:44:46 AM
i could be hear all night, but i gotta split/take in 3 or 4 chords of fire wood, repair the front brakes on my brothers car, and probly figure out wtf i'm gonna do for gifts cause i didn't shop in october, like i normaly do. aslo, i need to figure out how i can get drunk one last time before i start the new job.

taker easy folks!
 
2008-12-12 12:45:35 AM
Well, all in all this has been a very balanced conversation. I am pleasantly surprised. Sure, we have the "wait until they find out that God is fictional" and the "Santa Claus is a lie" contingent but most people realize that childhood is a time of wonder and that this little fiction adds to the enjoyment of the season for parents and kids alike.
 
2008-12-12 12:46:02 AM
hienekenftw: jack21221: There is no Santa, and the Sun is approximately 4.6 billion years old

I thought the Earth was 4.6 billion y o


Well, about 4.5 billion, anyway. The Sun and Earth were formed around the same time from the same cloud of interstellar gas and dust. As the center of the cloud was condensing and getting hotter, eventually hot enough to set off hydrogen fusion, clumps of matter, such as silicates, were forming further out in the cloud. One of those clumps would grow into the Earth.

/the more you know
 
2008-12-12 12:46:22 AM
Looks like it time to do the annual reading of the "Yes, Virginia" article.


/I might give a listen to the Dresden Dolls album by the same name instead.
 
2008-12-12 12:46:58 AM
jack21221: Atypical Person Reading Fark: If you're teaching six year olds, it shouldn't come up - it's not part of the curriculum anywhere in the U.S. or Canada at that age (and certainly not in Mejico, either).

And if the child brings it up? Should a teacher be fired for stating the universe is 13.7 billion years old?


What if the student brings up whether Obama should be voted for or not? It's no different. Should a teacher be fired for stating their political views? No. Should they be warned if it's outside reasonable classroom time use or curriculum? Yes. If they continue to spend class time on the topic when it's not part of what they teach, yes, of course they should be fired.

The proper method, however, is to say to little Johnny, "What an excellent question...we'll talk about it right after class and anyone who is interested may stay and hear what I have to say about that subject...and I'll try to point you to experts who may know more than I do about the subject."

See - it's not something that can be talked about quickly on a Fark forum - it's TEACHING, it takes TIME. I'm not sidestepping anything - but I know the laws and rules of teaching, and its realities pretty well.

You side-stepped the question.

Children do ask these kind of "big questions." I remember in 4th grade asking my teacher what the world would be like in the year 8,000. She responded "That's a great question, I wish I knew."

Louis CK has a pretty funny joke about his daughter asking questions about the sun. She asks if it will shine forever, and he says "No, one day it's going to explode." His daughter starts crying.

So, I go back to my previous scenario. A seven year old child asks their elementary school teacher, not during science class, "How old is the Earth?" Or, "How old is the Sun?" Or even "Are there aliens?"

All of those are questions about reality which are, in my opinion, within the scope of an educator to answer.


Yes, students ask "big questions." A good teacher knows enough child development (and adult development) to know how to handle it, as it comes up. Demolishing people's cherished beliefs is never easy - and there's good research on how and why we teachers should take that on (and how big the issues should be for what age group, and how many per hour, per day, per week - it's all stuff that a well-trained teacher should have a theoretical grasp of).

Doctors face very similar issues. Not everyone wants to know the whole truth about their lives/conditions - and they are supposed to "do no harm."

The hardest questions are more along the lines of, "Are freckles really ugly? Is it true redheads are mutants?" Kids aren't stupid and they can be really specific. "Well, then how come so many Playboy cover girls are blondes and brunettes?" You might think as a farker that it's okay to tell a fat kid they're fat, but...not so much, if you're a teacher.

Teachers are not psychologists, baby sitters, mythologians, truth-tellers, soothsayers, aestheticians, philosophers or all-knowing.

Notice we don't have a code that says "do no harm." It often hurts to learn.

"Do white people believe black people are ugly?" "Are black people more violent? My dad says the prisons are full of them." "Why did the United States kill all the Indians? They were practically unarmed!"

Teacher : "I'm not really qualified to say much about that...they study that in history and political science and philosophy...we will get to part of your question when we study...X..."

And so on. It takes a loooong time and a looooot of discipline and patience. and it's not really something that can be thoroughly discussed on Fark (although Lord knows, I try).
 
2008-12-12 12:47:33 AM
Samsaran: Well, all in all this has been a very balanced conversation. I am pleasantly surprised. Sure, we have the "wait until they find out that God is fictional" and the "Santa Claus is a lie" contingent but most people realize that childhood is a time of wonder and that this little fiction adds to the enjoyment of the season for parents and kids alike.

They aren't pets. They are mini-adults. Why does everyone assume you can't have a childhood of wonder without Santa Claus and God? You can.
 
2008-12-12 12:47:56 AM
JesusTheChrist: jack21221: Actually, they do.

No, they don't. You said the child was asking outside of science class.


Right, outside of a science class. Santa Claus, age of the universe, age of the sun... All scientific questions asked outside of a science class.

It can be scientifically proven that there is no Santa Claus. It can be scientifically proven that the universe is older than 6,000 years old.

These are related.
 
2008-12-12 12:54:18 AM
Atypical Person Reading Fark: What if the student brings up whether Obama should be voted for or not? It's no different.

It is different. It is very different. One is asking for an opinion. The other is asking for a fact. It isn't a matter of opinion whether or not Santa exists.

Atypical Person Reading Fark: Teachers are not ... truth-tellers

They're not? I thought they were educators, which means they educate about the world. That 2+2=4 is a truth. That the Earth revolves around the Sun is a truth. That the declaration of independence was signed in 1776 is a truth. That Santa doesn't exist is a truth.

Who decides what truths aren't ok to teach?

Atypical Person Reading Fark: Doctors face very similar issues. Not everyone wants to know the whole truth about their lives/conditions

Citation needed on that one. Or, at least give an example of where a doctor shouldn't tell a patient about their condition. To me, withholding such information would be grounds for a lawsuit at best.
 
2008-12-12 12:55:05 AM
jack21221: All scientific questions asked outside of a science class.

And because it is outside of a science class you say, "That's a question for when we cover that topic in science. In the meantime, you may want to ask your parents."
 
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