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(Science Blogs)   Staffer for VA politician breaks out a good old fashioned cane beating on an ambush videographer. This is not a repeat from 1856   (scienceblogs.com) divider line 98
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9725 clicks; posted to Main » on 28 Oct 2008 at 10:47 AM (5 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2008-10-28 10:18:54 AM
Close subby. Since it was "videographer" and not simply a reporter, I would have chosen a date from, say, the 1930s or later.
 
Cog
2008-10-28 10:22:09 AM
iawai: Close subby. Since it was "videographer" and not simply a reporter, I would have chosen a date from, say, the 1930s or later.

You do not know what you're talking about.
 
2008-10-28 10:35:59 AM
iawai: Close subby. Since it was "videographer" and not simply a reporter, I would have chosen a date from, say, the 1930s or later.

To save you a little embarrassment:

www.senate.gov
 
2008-10-28 10:50:47 AM
+1 Subby.
 
2008-10-28 10:51:33 AM
I'd love to read it BUT I'M NOT GOING TO REGISTER
 
2008-10-28 10:51:45 AM
If you act like paparazzi, you will be treated like paparazzi.
 
2008-10-28 10:52:54 AM
McCain would like to beat Obama with his Mccane on the Senate floor for all the uppity things he's said in the campaign..

And his Mississippi plantation owner ancestors would approve heartily.
 
2008-10-28 10:52:55 AM
Cog: You do not know what you're talking about.

Try 1835, perhaps? Old Hickory would have evevn made the Bull Moose think twice.
 
2008-10-28 10:53:24 AM
MasterThief: If you act like paparazzi, you will be treated like paparazzi.

The problem is, actors aren't elected. Politicians are.
 
2008-10-28 10:53:33 AM
www.franklin.ma.us

Approves.
 
2008-10-28 10:53:37 AM
"I shall not stand for you capturing my image on your moving daguerreotype machine! Come, sir! I am for you! I shall soundly thrash you with my cane!"
 
2008-10-28 10:53:55 AM
Link is dead guys (the old switcheroo to requiring registered account I bet).
 
2008-10-28 10:55:02 AM
I say the the videographer got what he needed.
 
2008-10-28 10:56:36 AM
Subscription article? YAAAAAY
 
2008-10-28 10:56:47 AM
Not gonna register.
 
2008-10-28 10:56:51 AM
Lot of videographers in 1856?
 
2008-10-28 10:57:27 AM
Wolf should have just answered the question and shut the twenty year old with a camera down. He's good enough to be able to do that. Now this inane story has legs.
 
2008-10-28 10:57:44 AM
Good on ya mate!

/subby fails for linking an article that requires registration
 
2008-10-28 10:58:01 AM
He's got nothing on this guy:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ben_Tillman

/from my home state, SC
 
2008-10-28 10:58:01 AM
Hitting somebody with your cane? What a macaca!
 
2008-10-28 10:58:01 AM
I submitted this with a better headline and a working link.

/so I'm getting a kick out of this
 
2008-10-28 10:58:30 AM
I bet he felt Terrible afterwards.

/Ivan a rating for obscurity.
 
2008-10-28 10:58:38 AM
iawai: Close subby. Since it was "videographer" and not simply a reporter, I would have chosen a date from, say, the 1930s or later.

As others pointed out, and as the cartoon depicts, the reference went over your head (^)
 
2008-10-28 10:59:18 AM
One day when I'm rich and famous, I'm going to find these paparazzi and stalk them in the way they stalk celebs and politicians and fill a trashy magazine with intimate details of their lives.

The second they shove any of my cameras or touch me at all, I'll complain to the police and hire some expensive lawyers to drag them through the court because they "assaulted me and left me traumatised".

Few will read it and I'll lose all my money but it'd be worth it.
 
2008-10-28 10:59:47 AM
MasterThief: If you act like paparazzi, you will be treated like paparazzi.

And if you use stick to assault a guy armed with a camera? Do people just jump out and throw candy at you to simulate a pinata?
 
2008-10-28 10:59:51 AM
Abstruse: Lot of videographers in 1856?

No, but there were political cane beatings involving Southerners
 
2008-10-28 10:59:59 AM
GWShenlong05: iawai: Close subby. Since it was "videographer" and not simply a reporter, I would have chosen a date from, say, the 1930s or later.

To save you a little embarrassment:


Yeah, but that creep Sumner had it coming.
 
2008-10-28 11:00:09 AM
Good for the old guy. This is getting just too bizarre.


/Link went straight to the article for me, and I'm not registered. At least I didn't think so....
 
Cog
2008-10-28 11:00:12 AM
abb3w: Cog: You do not know what you're talking about.

Try 1835, perhaps? Old Hickory would have evevn made the Bull Moose think twice.


No Try 1856 (new window)
 
Cog
2008-10-28 11:01:00 AM
HoozierDaddy: I submitted this with a better headline and a working link.

/so I'm getting a kick out of this


That's why yours went green right?
 
2008-10-28 11:01:44 AM
A Low-Tech Retort to Modern Politicking
Wolf Staffer's Bashing of 'Tracker' Highlights Concerns Over Aggressive Tactics

By Sandhya Somashekhar
Washington Post Staff Writer
Tuesday, October 28, 2008; B01



In political campaigns today, such high-tech tools as digital video cameras and YouTube can be used as weapons. But so, too, can a good, old-fashioned walking stick.

After a candidate's forum at a Winchester, Va., hotel Friday, two young campaign workers for Democrat Judy Feder, who is challenging 14-term incumbent Rep. Frank R. Wolf (R) in Northern Virginia, learned this the hard way.

Armed with a video camera, the Feder workers followed Wolf, his wife and a congressional staffer down the stairs and into the lobby to pepper Wolf with questions that they say he has evaded over the course of the campaign.

That's when Wolf's 83-year-old staffer whacked the videographer with a metal cane.

"Sir, please don't!" yelled the videographer, Matt Kent, 22, a field organizer for Feder's campaign, in the video, which the campaign posted on YouTube and on a Democratic blog over the weekend.

Yesterday morning, Wolf's campaign apologized for the actions of Ben Dutton, a former Winchester city council member who has worked for Wolf since 1992. But the congressman's reelection team also condemned the tactics employed by Feder's campaign, which they said was trying to goad Wolf into a hostile reaction with aggressive and incessant questioning.

"The campaign apologizes if Ben used poor judgment and hit him with his cane," said Dan Scandling, a Wolf campaign spokesman. But, he added, "the whole thing was provoked. It was a setup."

Ever since Virginia politician George Allen's political aspirations were sunk two years ago with the help of an online video, candidates have sent workers to shadow their opponents with cameras in the hopes of capturing a gaffe and plastering it across the Internet.

The tactic, called "tracking," has been criticized by politicians who have been the subject of it. Allen is widely believed to have lost his Senate race against James Webb in 2006 after he was caught on tape using an ethnic slur against a young Webb volunteer who had been tracking the then-incumbent senator.

Last year, Maine Sen. Susan Collins (R) made headlines when she demanded that her Democratic opponent call off his tracker. This year, independent activists and some associated with Democratic campaigns in Virginia have engaged in the practice too.

A frequent target has been Rep. Virgil Goode (R), who is fighting a challenge from Democrat Tom Perriello on Nov. 4.

"Somebody is usually at every campaign stop," Goode said. "I think they just travel around to try to spin something their way."

Experts say the tactic is becoming more aggressive. Robert Holsworth, a political scientist from Virginia Commonwealth University, said the trackers sometimes try to incite candidates into saying or doing something embarrassing.

"It's sort of this new level of campaigning, to see how they respond to the bait," Holsworth said. "Some candidates are able to maintain equanimity or handle it with aplomb and wit. Other candidates [however] are unprepared and lash out."

Kent said he was not trying to catch Wolf in an indiscreet moment. Rather, he said, he was trying to nail him down on crucial issues, particularly health care.

The candidates sparred recently after Wolf spoke favorably during a debate about Sen. John McCain's proposal to give people a $5,000 tax credit to help them pay for medical insurance. His campaign later said that he does not endorse the GOP presidential candidate's plan, and Feder has accused him of backtracking.

Kent said he also has asked Wolf about recent comments by a McCain staffer who made a distinction between Northern Virginia and "the real Virginia," and a remark by McCain's brother Joe McCain in which he called Alexandria and Arlington County "communist country." The comment by Joe McCain, coincidentally, was publicized by a Democratic tracker.

"In the middle of my question, I get smacked or whacked or hit in the hand with a cane," Kent said. "And again, a second time in quick succession, like, whack-whack. He was trying to smack the camera out of my hand, as far as I could tell."

He said Dutton struck him again later with his hand. A second jerking of the camera later in the video could corroborate that statement, though Scandling said Dutton only hit Kent once.

The two Feder staffers approached Wolf again Saturday at an event in McLean. The plan had been for them to question him at additional events until the election, though a Feder spokeswoman said the campaign might not follow through.

Scandling said Dutton was worried for the safety of Wolf's wife, Carolyn, and reacted in a "knee-jerk" manner. The Feder staffers had been questioning them aggressively for several minutes beforehand. Dutton regretted his actions, Scandling said.

The video also shows Kent's 22-year-old colleague, Josh Goodman, apparently crowded against the wall by Gary Lofton, a Republican member of the Frederick County Board of Supervisors and a Wolf supporter.

Lofton said he was not holding Goodman against his will but was trying to reason with him. The two young men, Lofton said, were raising their voices and "getting in the congressman's face," which worried him. He said he did not see anyone get struck.

"It just turned my stomach when I realized, hey, this is just activist partisan party politics at its absolute worst," Lofton said. "They should be absolutely ashamed of themselves if they have to resort to tactics like this to get elected."

Nothing justifies the response the campaign workers received, said Feder spokeswoman Marisa McNee.

"We've all seen the tape," she said. "Nothing occurs that justifies hitting someone with a cane or pinning them against a wall."

Staff researcher Meg Smith contributed to this report.
 
2008-10-28 11:02:18 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VjMoJa1NWXk

Hardly papparazzi level ambush. Is it unAmerican to question our elected officials? Hopefully this old coot will get locked up.
 
2008-10-28 11:02:48 AM
article sans registration...

Low-Tech Retort to Modern Politicking
Wolf Staffer's Bashing of 'Tracker' Highlights Concerns Over Aggressive Tactics
By Sandhya Somashekhar
Washington Post Staff Writer
Tuesday, October 28, 2008; Page B01

After a candidate's forum at a Winchester, Va., hotel Friday, two young campaign workers for Democrat Judy Feder, who is challenging 14-term incumbent Rep. Frank R. Wolf (R) in Northern Virginia, learned this the hard way.

Armed with a video camera, the Feder workers followed Wolf, his wife and a congressional staffer down the stairs and into the lobby to pepper Wolf with questions that they say he has evaded over the course of the campaign.

That's when Wolf's 83-year-old staffer whacked the videographer with a metal cane.

"Sir, please don't!" yelled the videographer, Matt Kent, 22, a field organizer for Feder's campaign, in the video, which the campaign posted on YouTube and on a Democratic blog over the weekend.


Yesterday morning, Wolf's campaign apologized for the actions of Ben Dutton, a former Winchester city council member who has worked for Wolf since 1992. But the congressman's reelection team also condemned the tactics employed by Feder's campaign, which they said was trying to goad Wolf into a hostile reaction with aggressive and incessant questioning.

"The campaign apologizes if Ben used poor judgment and hit him with his cane," said Dan Scandling, a Wolf campaign spokesman. But, he added, "the whole thing was provoked. It was a setup."

Ever since Virginia politician George Allen's political aspirations were sunk two years ago with the help of an online video, candidates have sent workers to shadow their opponents with cameras in the hopes of capturing a gaffe and plastering it across the Internet.

The tactic, called "tracking," has been criticized by politicians who have been the subject of it. Allen is widely believed to have lost his Senate race against James Webb in 2006 after he was caught on tape using an ethnic slur against a young Webb volunteer who had been tracking the then-incumbent senator.

Last year, Maine Sen. Susan Collins (R) made headlines when she demanded that her Democratic opponent call off his tracker. This year, independent activists and some associated with Democratic campaigns in Virginia have engaged in the practice too.

A frequent target has been Rep. Virgil Goode (R), who is fighting a challenge from Democrat Tom Perriello on Nov. 4.

"Somebody is usually at every campaign stop," Goode said. "I think they just travel around to try to spin something their way."

Experts say the tactic is becoming more aggressive. Robert Holsworth, a political scientist from Virginia Commonwealth University, said the trackers sometimes try to incite candidates into saying or doing something embarrassing.

"It's sort of this new level of campaigning, to see how they respond to the bait," Holsworth said. "Some candidates are able to maintain equanimity or handle it with aplomb and wit. Other candidates [however] are unprepared and lash out."

Kent said he was not trying to catch Wolf in an indiscreet moment. Rather, he said, he was trying to nail him down on crucial issues, particularly health care.

The candidates sparred recently after Wolf spoke favorably during a debate about Sen. John McCain's proposal to give people a $5,000 tax credit to help them pay for medical insurance. His campaign later said that he does not endorse the GOP presidential candidate's plan, and Feder has accused him of backtracking.


Kent said he also has asked Wolf about recent comments by a McCain staffer who made a distinction between Northern Virginia and "the real Virginia," and a remark by McCain's brother Joe McCain in which he called Alexandria and Arlington County "communist country." The comment by Joe McCain, coincidentally, was publicized by a Democratic tracker.

"In the middle of my question, I get smacked or whacked or hit in the hand with a cane," Kent said. "And again, a second time in quick succession, like, whack-whack. He was trying to smack the camera out of my hand, as far as I could tell."

He said Dutton struck him again later with his hand. A second jerking of the camera later in the video could corroborate that statement, though Scandling said Dutton only hit Kent once.

The two Feder staffers approached Wolf again Saturday at an event in McLean. The plan had been for them to question him at additional events until the election, though a Feder spokeswoman said the campaign might not follow through.

Scandling said Dutton was worried for the safety of Wolf's wife, Carolyn, and reacted in a "knee-jerk" manner. The Feder staffers had been questioning them aggressively for several minutes beforehand. Dutton regretted his actions, Scandling said.

The video also shows Kent's 22-year-old colleague, Josh Goodman, apparently crowded against the wall by Gary Lofton, a Republican member of the Frederick County Board of Supervisors and a Wolf supporter.

Lofton said he was not holding Goodman against his will but was trying to reason with him. The two young men, Lofton said, were raising their voices and "getting in the congressman's face," which worried him. He said he did not see anyone get struck.

"It just turned my stomach when I realized, hey, this is just activist partisan party politics at its absolute worst," Lofton said. "They should be absolutely ashamed of themselves if they have to resort to tactics like this to get elected."

Nothing justifies the response the campaign workers received, said Feder spokeswoman Marisa McNee.

"We've all seen the tape," she said. "Nothing occurs that justifies hitting someone with a cane or pinning them against a wall."

Staff researcher Meg Smith contributed to this report.
 
2008-10-28 11:05:51 AM
Dictatorial_Flair: MasterThief: If you act like paparazzi, you will be treated like paparazzi.

And if you use stick to assault a guy armed with a camera? Do people just jump out and throw candy at you to simulate a pinata?



You win this time sir.
 
2008-10-28 11:07:34 AM
Gosh, what an annoying videographer... he asked if he could ask a question 10 times.. he could have just asked the question. I say he deserves a beat down for that.
 
2008-10-28 11:07:53 AM
Cog: No Try 1856 (new window)

Ooh, a lovely tale. I hadn't heard that one before.
Possibly because it makes southerners look like violent dumbasses.
 
2008-10-28 11:08:23 AM
Thank you Madame.
 
2008-10-28 11:10:41 AM
badLogic: A Low-Tech Retort to Modern Politicking
Wolf Staffer's Bashing of 'Tracker' Highlights Concerns Over Aggressive Tactics

By Sandhya Somashekhar
Washington Post Staff Writer
Tuesday, October 28, 2008; B01

I love it, someone commits assault and it is said to highlight the problems with aggressive campaign tactics. Yep, it must be the assaultee's fault. Great logic, Lou.

14 freakin' terms? Gaaaah....

In political campaigns today, such high-tech tools as digital video cameras and YouTube can be used as weapons. But so, too, can a good, old-fashioned walking stick.

After a candidate's forum at a Winchester, Va., hotel Friday, two young campaign workers for Democrat Judy Feder, who is challenging 14-term incumbent Rep. Frank R. Wolf (R) in Northern Virginia, learned this the hard way.

Armed with a video camera, the Feder workers followed Wolf, his wife and a congressional staffer down the stairs and into the lobby to pepper Wolf with questions that they say he has evaded over the course of the campaign.

That's when Wolf's 83-year-old staffer whacked the videographer with a metal cane.

"Sir, please don't!" yelled the videographer, Matt Kent, 22, a field organizer for Feder's campaign, in the video, which the campaign posted on YouTube and on a Democratic blog over the weekend.

Yesterday morning, Wolf's campaign apologized for the actions of Ben Dutton, a former Winchester city council member who has worked for Wolf since 1992. But the congressman's reelection team also condemned the tactics employed by Feder's campaign, which they said was trying to goad Wolf into a hostile reaction with aggressive and incessant questioning.

"The campaign apologizes if Ben used poor judgment and hit him with his cane," said Dan Scandling, a Wolf campaign spokesman. But, he added, "the whole thing was provoked. It was a setup."

Ever since Virginia politician George Allen's political aspirations were sunk two years ago with the help of an online video, candidates have sent workers to shadow their opponents with cameras in the hopes of capturing a gaffe and plastering it across the Internet.

The tactic, called "tracking," has been criticized by politicians who have been the subject of it. Allen is widely believed to have lost his Senate race against James Webb in 2006 after he was caught on tape using an ethnic slur against a young Webb volunteer who had been tracking the then-incumbent senator.

Last year, Maine Sen. Susan Collins (R) made headlines when she demanded that her Democratic opponent call off his tracker. This year, independent activists and some associated with Democratic campaigns in Virginia have engaged in the practice too.

A frequent target has been Rep. Virgil Goode (R), who is fighting a challenge from Democrat Tom Perriello on Nov. 4.

"Somebody is usually at every campaign stop," Goode said. "I think they just travel around to try to spin something their way."

Experts say the tactic is becoming more aggressive. Robert Holsworth, a political scientist from Virginia Commonwealth University, said the trackers sometimes try to incite candidates into saying or doing something embarrassing.

"It's sort of this new level of campaigning, to see how they respond to the bait," Holsworth said. "Some candidates are able to maintain equanimity or handle it with aplomb and wit. Other candidates [however] are unprepared and lash out."

Kent said he was not trying to catch Wolf in an indiscreet moment. Rather, he said, he was trying to nail him down on crucial issues, particularly health care.

The candidates sparred recently after Wolf spoke favorably during a debate about Sen. John McCain's proposal to give people a $5,000 tax credit to help them pay for medical insurance. His campaign later said that he does not endorse the GOP presidential candidate's plan, and Feder has accused him of backtracking.

Kent said he also has asked Wolf about recent comments by a McCain staffer who made a distinction between Northern Virginia and "the real Virginia," and a remark by McCain's brother Joe McCain in which he called Alexandria and Arlington County "communist country." The comment by Joe McCain, coincidentally, was publicized by a Democratic tracker.

"In the middle of my question, I get smacked or whacked or hit in the hand w ...
 
2008-10-28 11:12:00 AM
"The campaign apologizes if Ben used poor judgment and hit him with his cane,"

cocksuckers.
 
2008-10-28 11:12:04 AM
I went to high school with Wolf's spokesman, Dan Scandling, but I haven't seen him since the day we graduated. That is all.
 
2008-10-28 11:12:16 AM
If the tables were turned and this was a McCain supporter at an Obama rally getting a beat down from an eldery person Dailykos would be standing up cheering for those speaking truth to power (or whatever that saying is).

Kid acts like an annoying jerk and gets a beat down. That's a good morning, not a story.
 
2008-10-28 11:17:38 AM
I came here for Pimp references with the cane, but was dissapointed.
 
2008-10-28 11:18:07 AM
GWShenlong05: SOUTHERN CHIVALRY - ARGUMENT VERSUS CLUBS'S.

Quick, someone get a telegraph to the grammar whigs!
 
2008-10-28 11:18:43 AM
lelio: If the tables were turned and this was a McCain supporter at an Obama rally getting a beat down from an eldery person Dailykos would be standing up cheering for those speaking truth to power (or whatever that saying is).

Kid acts like an annoying jerk and gets a beat down. That's a good morning, not a story.


Can I use this in my Psych 101 seminar as an example of "projection"?

/I do not have a Psych 101 seminar.
 
2008-10-28 11:19:02 AM
Fantastic - Winchester makes Fark (facepalm). Like it was during The Late Unpleasantness, Winchester has found itself on the front lines between "Real" Virginia and "Fake" Virginia. Lots of folks from No. VA have moved out here in recent years because of the housing market but they have come into stark contrast to some of the old families who have been here for generations and that has also manifested itself in politics in recent years. This is the first election in a long time where the Democrats have a real chance of carrying Frederick Co. and a lot of that is due to the influx of folks from Fairfax and Loudoun.

/Looks like that was at the local Perkins Restaurant
//Winchester area farker
 
2008-10-28 11:19:35 AM
lelio: Kid acts like an annoying jerk and gets a beat down. That's a good morning, not a story.

No matter how annoying someone is, it doesn't justify violence. It does often result in it, because people are far from perfect, but it still usually reflects worse on the person who reacted violently, particularly if the person was merely annoying rather than offensive and insulting.
 
2008-10-28 11:25:17 AM
Ktonos

Eh, the Clarke County Fair made Fark a couple months ago. Equal time for the city, I guess.

/miss the mountains
//not the politics
 
2008-10-28 11:26:48 AM
Wolf would've cruised to re-election if not for this.

This is not quite a macaca moment, mind you, but Wolf was standing right there and made no effort to stop his overzealous staffers.

The story is no longer 'Feder camp has annoying staffers,' it is now 'Wolf has a bunch of psychos working for him and he approves of their message.'

I'd move Wolf's seat from being 90% GOP safe to only 70% GOP safe now.

Two minor scandals also happen to hit endangered Republican congressmen:

BTW, Virgil Goode's press secretary resigned after it appeared the secretary was involved in making some porn movies.

Thelma Drake's apparently made $300k or so off of foreclosed homes and is agitating to make it easier for banks to foreclose.
 
2008-10-28 11:33:29 AM
MasterThief: If you act like paparazzi, you will be treated like paparazzi.

Think real hard about where you're going with that. Unless of course this is okay because the staffer was a Republican.
 
2008-10-28 11:35:56 AM
GWShenlong05: iawai: Close subby. Since it was "videographer" and not simply a reporter, I would have chosen a date from, say, the 1930s or later.

To save you a little embarrassment:


Thank you. It's funny, I was just discussing this very beating and cartoon with the missus last weekend ...

weird.
 
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