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(iReport)   Last house standing in Galveston was built to withstand a Cat 5 hurricane. With amazing pics. BONUS: Tinfoil-hatter comments a-plenty in iReporter section   (ireport.com) divider line 177
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50518 clicks; posted to Main » on 19 Sep 2008 at 1:11 PM (5 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2008-09-19 01:36:28 PM
Bendal
There is, I believe a Category 5 proof home that was built somewhere in the Florida panhandle.....

The home you are referring to is a geodesic dome home on Pensacola Beach. I believe it has survived Hurricanes Dennis and Ivan and maybe some others, but it has not faced a Cat 5 yet.
 
2008-09-19 01:36:42 PM
mrshowrules [TotalFark] Quote 2008-09-19 01:09:08 PM
swingerhead: I call fake. Ive been scanning the NOAA sat photos since they came out for our insureds properties and havent seen anything like 1 house among nothing.

Link (new window) Link to NOAA photos




Gilcrest tx,

FOUND IT
Link (new window)
bottom left corner (well on the coast, bottom left is ocean)
 
2008-09-19 01:36:48 PM
I watched the news a few days ago when they first were allowed into Gilchrest. You could see a house that looked just like this one. (if it wasn't this one.)

Honda generators are awesome. Fuel efficient, powers my fridge, computer and TV without a problem. George Foreman Grill, not so much.
 
2008-09-19 01:36:54 PM
What's freaky about that photo is all of the nothing-- just stilts. Odds are, there were a few people holed up in those houses that will never be seen again.

BTW, if you want to see wacky conspiracy theories, check out the message boards on KHOU, particularly the thread about "Deaths".
 
2008-09-19 01:37:04 PM
Baron-Harkonnen: Aeonite: Here's an idea. Don't live there any more.


That's a farking stupid thing to say.

People have to live there--it's a vital port. Are people whose houses are destroyed by a tornado stupid for living in Tornado Alley? Or people whose houses are destroyed by a landslide? Is that their fault, too? It doesn't matter where you live, nature can fark it up for you.


Goddamn, at least build with brick.
 
2008-09-19 01:37:18 PM
Wasn't there a STNG episode like this?

Did the guy living there wipe an entire race out of existence afterwards?
 
2008-09-19 01:37:25 PM
I saw a special years ago about this type of construction. The main living areas of the home are on the second and third floor which sit on top of concrete pillars. The walls of the downstairs area usually only enclose a garage or storage area and are not tied to the foundation or pillars. The idea is that when the storm surge hits the walls of the lower level wash out, letting the water through and preserving the floors above.

In the "concept house" the windows were laminated to prevent them from blowing out, the walls, roof and floor were all tied together and they even had a different design for the eves of the roof to prevent the wind from getting under them.

When will people figure out that there are different ways to build homes and buildings that are adaptive to the hazards of each area. You don't build a flat-roofed adobe house in the jungle for a reason; stop building simple ground level stick-frame homes in areas prone to hurricanes.
 
2008-09-19 01:40:03 PM
Well, I guess it's not so great, given the water damage noted here. Still, pretty cool, standing up to Cat 5 winds. I wonder what that means, construction-wise. What did they actually do?
 
2008-09-19 01:40:54 PM
How much does that beach front property go for now?
 
2008-09-19 01:41:25 PM
All of you claiming that the picture is 'shopped because you can tell by the pixels are farking retarded. There have been dozens of photos of this house published across the international newswires.

Maybe you're trolling me and aren't just stupid. But you seem to be taking yourselves awfully seriously so I'm guessing that you're just stupid.

Blind_Io: stop building simple ground level stick-frame homes in areas prone to hurricanes.

They don't build ground level stick-frame homes... in Florida. I'm not sure it's even legal to. And the vaulting and bolstering that goes into building a Florida roof is absolutely ridiculous.
 
2008-09-19 01:41:54 PM
img399.imageshack.us


http://ngs.woc.noaa.gov/storms/ike/geo-C25883958.jpg
 
2008-09-19 01:46:28 PM
SRSLY

Who spends ALL that money on construction of a home to withstand a Cat5 and doesn't bother to install HURRICANE SHUDDERS?!

/FAIL
 
2008-09-19 01:47:09 PM
Blind_Io: When will people figure out that there are different ways to build homes and buildings that are adaptive to the hazards of each area. You don't build a flat-roofed adobe house in the jungle for a reason; stop building simple ground level stick-frame homes in areas prone to hurricanes.

As long as insurance companies will continue to write policies on location-inappropriate houses, and banks will finance them, then there's no incentive for people to do any different.
 
2008-09-19 01:47:30 PM
Shrugging Atlas: From TFA:
Pam and Warren Adams rebuilt their home in February 2006 after Hurricane Rita destroyed it the previous year.

One house totally destroyed by a hurricane, and the second gutted by another two years later.

Is a beachfront view really worth this?


The next one they build will probably burn down, fall over, then sink into the sand.
 
2008-09-19 01:47:52 PM
ShaniquaDon'tLiveHereNoMo': All of you claiming that the picture is 'shopped because you can tell by the pixels are farking retarded.

Not really, they're just trying real hard to be funny. Like this guy:

img235.imageshack.us
 
2008-09-19 01:48:37 PM
Must've been my ex, Allison. I heard she somehow lost her sanity.
 
2008-09-19 01:48:44 PM
Patzycakes: HURRICANE SHUDDERS?!

They should use cedar shakes instead.

/Shutters at the thought
 
2008-09-19 01:49:51 PM
damn, anyone got the name of that builder/contractor?

/good job dude
 
2008-09-19 01:51:15 PM
improvius: Is a beachfront view really worth this?

The next one they build will probably burn down, fall over, then sink into the sand.


LOL +1
/Kudos to you
//Good pig country there?
 
2008-09-19 01:51:49 PM
/I fail at spelling. But at least I can admit it.

/Shudder
/Shutter

*grin*
 
2008-09-19 01:52:12 PM
Legacy Reserves Lp (LGCY) wasn't effected.

Whew!
 
2008-09-19 01:52:39 PM
swingerhead: I call fake. Ive been scanning the NOAA sat photos since they came out for our insureds properties and havent seen anything like 1 house among nothing.

Link (new window) Link to NOAA photos


Ha ha, suck it, #8
 
2008-09-19 01:52:45 PM
Owner of the house in question. Asks to be left alone; he does not know why he was spared.

i106.photobucket.com
 
2008-09-19 01:53:56 PM
As someone who designs 130 mph wind and debris resistant homes in coastal SW Florida, I can testify to the fact that when the big one hits here there will be a lot of great new fishing cabins out in the middle of the water.

Also getting a kick out of some of the ignorant comments in this thread.

Building Codes.
They work, biatches!
 
2008-09-19 01:54:01 PM
"It's beautiful when God answers prayer!"

Heh.
 
2008-09-19 01:54:08 PM
ctobio: I'm firmly convinced that the average comment contributor on Fark is a goddamned poet laureate compared to the mouthbreathers that post on CNN's, or any other online newspaper's, comment section.

Indeed.
 
2008-09-19 01:54:10 PM
Hudspeth said that the couple hired a contractor to build a home that could withstand a Category 5 hurricane. Warren Adams watched over every step of the construction to make sure it was done correctly

The couple evacuated to a friend's house in Lufkin, Texas, hours before Ike made landfall last week.



So I'm guessing they didn't actually trust that their contractor did the job correctly.
 
2008-09-19 01:54:46 PM
notmtwain -- "I hope he got a guarantee. It's clear the builder did not deliver what he promised."

I think the builder did quite well. The structure, the shingles and even the windows survived the high winds of Ike. Unfortunately, water from the storm surge flooded the interior.
 
2008-09-19 01:55:21 PM
mrshowrules: Cool but I think it impossible to build a Cat 5 home. ..., you could not guarantee it to survive a Cat 5.

I don't know bout that.
I designed a home in 1973 that was earth sheltered, subterranean, with a passive convective solar loop, and if it could be built on the ocean, it would work. But I did not design it for the beach. I designed it for new england. The idea is the house can be heated with a candle, and lit with the sun, and pretty much be storm proof.
It is meant to be forever cozy.

I guess I could design one for the beach, but that is not practical. The beach moves all the time.
 
2008-09-19 01:55:37 PM
towatchoverme: Wasn't there a STNG episode like this?

Did the guy living there wipe an entire race out of existence afterwards?


Lieutenant Worf: Sir - may I say your attempt to hold the away team at bay with a non-functioning weapon was an act of unmitigated gall.
Kevin Uxbridge: Didn't fool you, huh?
Lieutenant Worf: I admire gall.
 
2008-09-19 01:56:14 PM
imgod2u: Must've been my ex, Allison. I heard she somehow lost her sanity.

At first I chuckled....now I can't get the damned song outta my head.
 
2008-09-19 01:58:06 PM
The owner
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2008-09-19 01:58:23 PM
Well, let's say the interior was fine. Given the fact that it appears that no other homes were left standing for miles, I wonder if the power company will restore power to that lone house.
 
2008-09-19 01:59:57 PM
Blind_Io: stop building simple ground level stick-frame homes in areas prone to hurricanes.

I've got a uncle living on the Florida beach front who's built his house out of 2 1/2 ft thick reinforced concrete with no windows..

It would probably survive a cat 5 hurricane, but afterwards you'd need scuba gear to get to it..
 
2008-09-19 02:00:49 PM
towatchoverme: STNG

You are correct sir!

Link (new window)
 
2008-09-19 02:02:06 PM
I'm glad it's real just to shut up all the "That's so fake" group of self proclaimed photoshop experts. The "I'm always right" attitude some people project on the web is f*cking annoying.

Anyway, I think the house is pretty cool but it's still going to have to be torn down. They might be able to recover part of the house, but even with the deeper pillars, the foundation may not be any good. I wish them luck.

More photos of it
http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/09/18/ike.last.house.standing/index.html
 
2008-09-19 02:04:30 PM
Scorched Colon: So I'm guessing they didn't actually trust that their contractor did the job correctly.

Just because you expect your structure to survive a hurricane it doesn't mean that it's a good idea to hang out where there's no power, running water, food, transportation, or basic health and security services for one or more months.
 
2008-09-19 02:06:56 PM
www.evacommentary.org
 
2008-09-19 02:07:39 PM
towatchoverme: Wasn't there a STNG episode like this?

Did the guy living there wipe an entire race out of existence afterwards?


Actually he wiped them out before the Enterprise got there, but yes, essentially correct.
 
2008-09-19 02:08:56 PM
ladyfortuna: ctobio: I'm firmly convinced that the average comment contributor on Fark is a goddamned poet laureate compared to the mouthbreathers that post on CNN's, or any other online newspaper's, comment section.

Indeed.


You guys ever been to YouTube?
 
2008-09-19 02:09:08 PM
I think they hired this guy to defend the house...

images-cdn01.associatedcontent.com


/Good thing the name of the hurricane wasn't Hurricane Ditka
 
2008-09-19 02:09:31 PM
ArkconI wonder what that means, construction-wise. What did they actually do?

It's been mostly covered, but to summarize:

*Frame is built on heavy pylons sunk deep and set in concrete
*Bottom floor walls are weakly attached and designed to sheer away in the storm surge, leaving nothing but the pylons for water and debris to impact
*Presumably heavier than normal framing for the upper floor, better roof joists, heavy hurricane clips (metal straps) keeping it all together
*Thick windows with anti-shatter film and high quality frames
*Gable roofs are supposed to be the worst for hurricanes (weak on the ends), OTOH that's the type of roof this house uses, they probably reinforced the hell out of it
*Hurricane-rated shingles

Hurricane shutters or simply putting up some plywood would have been helpful.

It's always sort of amazed me that houses in the US are usually barely dry pine 2x4's nailed together. Pine is the suckiest of woods and nails barely work in something that soft. Hardwood and nails or pine and screws OK, but the two combined sort of alarm me.

/own 130 year old farmhouse, framing 100% Indiana hardwood with handforged iron nails
 
2008-09-19 02:11:54 PM
mrshowrules
Unless it is built out of solid steel, you could not guarantee it to survive a Cat 5.

Nah, with enough reinforcement, you could build a house that would resist a cat 5 and survive projectiles hurdled by the storm/storm surge, (poured in place concrete comes to mind) but the cost would be way too prohibitive.
 
2008-09-19 02:12:22 PM
Its not impossible to build a cat 5 home there, perhaps a concrete dome like bunker raised high enough off the ground. It wouldn't win a beauty contest probably, but it would last.
 
2008-09-19 02:13:03 PM
mrshowrules: Cool but I think it impossible to build a Cat 5 home. Even if you home could resist the wind and the storm surge/flooding, how can it resist another house being smashed in to your house. A Cat 5 hurrican can pick-up your neighbours house and drop it on yours. Unless it is built out of solid steel, you could not guarantee it to survive a Cat 5.

img176.imageshack.us
 
2008-09-19 02:13:32 PM
phishfood: Its not impossible to build a cat 5 home there, perhaps a concrete dome like bunker raised high enough off the ground. It wouldn't win a beauty contest probably, but it would last.

My old design is more like a concrete dome like bunker sunk deep enough in the ground. But again, do not build structures on land that will move.
 
2008-09-19 02:13:36 PM
I showed the photo of the lone house to a co-worker. Her response? "Well that was probably the only house that was prayed for".

That my friends is the reason why I'm going to win the election.

I weep for humanity.
 
2008-09-19 02:13:41 PM
It's always been possible to build hurricane resistant homes, but the expense is tremendous.

When you're paying $200,000 for what is essentially a basic, run of the mill house, (well, in CA, make that $500,000) multiply that times 4 for the same sized home made hurricane resistant.

You can also build homes that are tornado proof, but, again, the cost is extreme and the designs limited. For tornados, the houses need to basically be cornerless, preferably built like bomb shelters.

From the aerial view, you can see that the whole area is just one big beach, with little elevation. After a major hit some decades ago, one of the Gulf states banned rebuilding on the beaches and turned them into parks and buffer zones. Unless you're willing to fork over the money to build a hurricane resistant home, they need do the same thing with these beaches.

I saw a design once where the house was built up high on cement and steel piers, with only car parking below. There were stairs and a small elevator to get to the top floors. The house itself was not only heavily reinforced, but equipped with those shatter proof storm windows, roll down steel security shutters and had it's own emergency generator situated well above the ground.

As a courier, I found a much cheaper and kind of innovative version some folks made themselves. Not having much money, they bought a home which was surrounded by a dense forest of pine trees and, since the land tended to be marshy during rains, the wooden house was built up on stilts. The new owners and their kids took steel cables and heavy ropes and ran rope bridges through the trees to smaller out buildings they also put up on stilts. The coolest thing was a patio, separate from the house, also on stilts, connected by a cable bridge.

I delivered to them after a small hurricane and had a lot of problems getting back there due to the water and found them surrounded by a sea of mud and standing water, with no power except from a small generator, but they were high and dry. They were cooking on a built in fireplace and the kids were having a ball playing in the water.

The thick woods had acted like a buffer, helping to deflect the winds and if trees fell, they were mainly those on the outer edge. The guy had cleared tall trees away from the house so if any fell, none could reach it.

He and his family salvaged and scrounged most of the cable, wood and ropes needed to build the bridges.

The better, much more expensive homes a mile or so away weren't all that lucky.
 
2008-09-19 02:14:06 PM
I must be missing something. Ike was a Cat 2 when it hit wasn't it? Wrightsville Beach, NC has taken several direct hits from Cat 3's in the last 10 years with nowhere near this kind of damage. Houses got seriously farked up but they were all still standing. Is there any building codes in Texas. I know here they are very strict.
 
2008-09-19 02:17:57 PM
BuckyFudge: I must be missing something. Ike was a Cat 2 when it hit wasn't it? Wrightsville Beach, NC has taken several direct hits from Cat 3's in the last 10 years with nowhere near this kind of damage. Houses got seriously farked up but they were all still standing. Is there any building codes in Texas. I know here they are very strict.

No, there aren't building codes in Texas! What are you, some sort of commie?
 
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