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(New Scientist)   Paper still beats rock, but scissors no longer beat paper, they shatter instead   (technology.newscientist.com ) divider line
    More: Cool  
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5964 clicks; posted to Geek » on 09 Jun 2008 at 5:57 AM (7 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



41 Comments   (+0 »)
   

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2008-06-08 11:33:38 PM  
i210.photobucket.com

"Is this metal? I got a bet with Joe."
 
2008-06-09 06:24:40 AM  
This might be the greatest thing ever.

If it can be done cheaply.
 
2008-06-09 06:34:31 AM  
i104.photobucket.com

Rock crushes scissors. But paper covers rock. And scissors cuts paper! Kif, we have a conundrum.
 
2008-06-09 07:04:41 AM  
www.memoram.com

"Always remember, your bones will not break in a bobsled. No, no, no. They shatter." -- John Candy, Cool Runnings

/thread jack over
//Sorry, thats all I could think about when I read this headline.
 
2008-06-09 07:08:04 AM  
Toilet paper supplies for Taco Bell have been secured.
 
2008-06-09 07:11:42 AM  
So much for paper airplanes and origami
 
2008-06-09 07:17:10 AM  
Transparent aluminum!

At least that's what I conclude after RTA.
Perhaps this will lead to indestructable money or spider rope. Who knows. I love science.

/rip the phone book in half now TBN Power Team
 
2008-06-09 08:10:30 AM  
Great Headline.


This blows my mind.
Mechanical testing shows it has a tensile strength of 214 megapascals, making it stronger than cast iron (130 MPa) and almost as strong as structural steel (250 MPa).


also:
i.a.cnn.net
Paper Cut.
 
2008-06-09 08:13:02 AM  
Yes, but what the hell is this good for? Writing really strong book reports? God damnit we waste money on some stupid shiat.
 
2008-06-09 08:21:21 AM  
Barack still beats everything though.
 
2008-06-09 08:50:38 AM  
SteelCityKid: Yes, but what the hell is this good for? Writing really strong book reports? God damnit we waste money on some stupid shiat.

Its a paper-thin substance thats stronger than iron. You couldn't make up something more useful.
 
2008-06-09 08:55:37 AM  
what I never understood is that people say God wrote the bible.....

.....okay,then how come he use the crappiest paper available?

/this paper is cool....lets hope they make shredders to destroy my personal documents, evidence
 
2008-06-09 09:01:38 AM  
SteelCityKid: Yes, but what the hell is this good for?

Most of our materials that are very strong are also very dense, like you. Having a very strong material that isn't dense would be incredibly valuable.

For starters, this could entirely replace fiberglass, which is expensive and a bit hazardous to work with. But it could also replace a lot of plastics, which is becoming increasingly important as our oil supply dwindles.

Also, I don't know how well this material holds up against penetration, but is anyone else seeing a nanopaper-kevlar based body armor? It's the ballistic plates that make body armor heavy- this could potentially reduce the thickness and weight of those plates.
 
2008-06-09 09:02:09 AM  
werd. a whole new generation of shredders.
 
2008-06-09 09:04:15 AM  
t3knomanser: which is becoming increasingly important as our oil supply dwindles.

Oh, and one more thing: unlike plastics which depend on a multi-use non-renewable resource, this is made out of plants. It literally grows on trees.
 
2008-06-09 09:15:05 AM  
t3knomanser:

...I don't know how well this material holds up against penetration..


Give me 20 or 30 minutes and I'll tell you.

also,
i196.photobucket.com

/approves
//not obscure
 
2008-06-09 09:25:07 AM  
goldencopulations: /approves
//not obscure


Hah. Awesome. Not obscure, but awesome.
 
2008-06-09 09:44:25 AM  
t3knomanser: I don't know how well this material holds up against penetration, but is anyone else seeing a nanopaper-kevlar based body armor?

You generally don't want to make body armor that burns.

It might make a nice material for modular vehicle armor, though. If the fibers ensnare shrapnel and dissipate shock waves as an IED rips through them, that's good enough to make reams of them into a light, swappable vehicle plating. Fuel economy = greater range for military vehicles, so a lighter armor would be a nice plus. Just design a glue that melts at about 150C, and the plates would fall off when they burn.
 
2008-06-09 09:52:15 AM  
Of course, a sheet of cast iron as thick as the test strips in TFA (50 microns, 0.002 inches, about three times as thick as standard aluminum foil) wouldn't be all that strong. But you could presumably make this super-paper as thick as you like.
 
2008-06-09 09:55:26 AM  
You give me body armor that weighs less than a paperback novel, and I'm sure I can find something to coat it with that will turn it fire-resistant. Hell, alternate layers of of this stuff and nomex and get the best of both worlds.

Of course, it's hard to find gnomes for raw source material, but our troops are worth it damn it.
 
2008-06-09 10:21:45 AM  
Reyito: You give me body armor that weighs less than a paperback novel, and I'm sure I can find something to coat it with that will turn it fire-resistant.

Hmm, good point. It might be bulky and thus hard to move in, though. It'll really come down to engineering, but definitely worth a shot.

Reyito: Of course, it's hard to find gnomes for raw source material, but our troops are worth it damn it.

Oh, this nanopaper is still frontier tech. They aren't even giving the troops meaningful armor already in production.
 
2008-06-09 10:28:01 AM  
Paper doesn't beat rock, never has.
 
2008-06-09 10:33:34 AM  
This stuff is potentially full of equal parts awesome and win. It's stories like this that make me regret not declaring Materials Engineering.

/Went Mechanical Engineering instead
//Thinking of going back to school and getting the MatE degree too
 
2008-06-09 10:34:56 AM  
dragonchild: Just design a glue that melts at about 150C, and the plates would fall off when they burn.

bong resin? finally they would have a legal use of all of Saddams hookahs!
 
2008-06-09 10:48:56 AM  
But Cutco scissors can cut a penny in half. Time to buy Cutco stock!!
 
2008-06-09 11:01:18 AM  
t3knomanser: Also, I don't know how well this material holds up against penetration

img227.imageshack.us
 
2008-06-09 11:02:14 AM  
wildcardjack: This might be the greatest thing ever.

If it can be done cheaply.


At first, hell no. Given a couple years, the price will come down.

Make it waterproof and you could use it for car bodies, boat hulls--anywhere you'd use fiberglass as a structural component. Then there's lighter, stronger packing materials. Lightweight body armor. The possibilities are immense with something like this.
 
2008-06-09 11:16:16 AM  
This stuff is going to be used in the skins of airplanes.
 
2008-06-09 11:16:55 AM  
jwrebholz: At first, hell no.

I wouldn't be so sure about that. The question is how hard is it to manufacture and maintain the enzyme that's key to this process. The other bits- an agitator and drying system? Doesn't sound that big. There are, of course, startup costs and infrastructure changes, but this doesn't look like it's going to be a huge investment to get started.

Now, considering how thin it is, I wonder if my company, which makes coatings, might be interested in it. It could be a cool base-coat for paint and dye application.
 
2008-06-09 11:33:03 AM  
If I built a toothpick bridge and covered it with this paper, would I be considered a God???
 
2008-06-09 12:06:06 PM  
Further proof that paper mache will be the solution to ALL engineering problems.
 
2008-06-09 12:12:09 PM  
The good news: It's cheaper than dirt.

The bad news: It really doesn't hold up against cutting or penetration (the scissors will not shatter), but it's tougher and would require sharper implements to cut it cleanly.

Also, a quick reality check for those who aren't familiar with the test they used: It's paper-thin, and stronger than iron that is also paper-thin. If you're picturing a sheet of this withstanding more force than an I-beam, that's not how this will work.
 
2008-06-09 12:22:54 PM  
Niali: It's paper-thin, and stronger than iron that is also paper-thin. If you're picturing a sheet of this withstanding more force than an I-beam, that's not how this will work.

No, but in laymen's terms it's called "pound-for-pound stronger". Durability and yield strength are two different things, anyway.

I don't expect an organic polymer to replace steel for load-bearing frames anytime soon, but that don't mean it ain't useful.
 
2008-06-09 12:23:22 PM  
Niali: If you're picturing a sheet of this withstanding more force than an I-beam, that's not how this will work.

How about if I'm picturing an I-beam thickness of paper...
 
2008-06-09 01:31:36 PM  
i307.photobucket.com
 
2008-06-09 02:40:02 PM  
paper doesn't beat rock, it covers rock.
 
2008-06-09 03:00:54 PM  
if this is true
as cost-effective as they portray
then this is huge.

kind of like when I saw the announcement of Cloning of Dolly.
the equivalent of when the Bomb was tested the first time.

If you could mold and layer this, then its significant.
And it will change how everything is made.

I hope it is true.
 
2008-06-09 06:33:29 PM  
We could finally have our cable material for Orbital Towers! Wheee!
Strong as steel, but only has to support 1/8 the weight... mmmm niiicee
 
2008-06-09 08:16:10 PM  
cman: "Always remember, your bones will not break in a bobsled. No, no, no. They shatter." -- John Candy, Cool Runnings

/thread jack over
//Sorry, thats all I could think about when I read this headline.


You and me, both!

That movie has its moments.
 
2008-06-09 10:36:10 PM  
You know who else thought paper beat scissors?


img103.imageshack.us
img103.imageshack.us

Credit to original 'shopper
 
2008-06-10 01:18:54 PM  
That is gonna make some kick-ass pterodactyls.
 
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