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(Gazette)   If your Social Security number is 457-55-5462, your identity has been stolen. Someone call LifeLock. Wait, isn't that the SSN of LifeLock's CEO?   (wvgazette.com) divider line 173
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49690 clicks; posted to Main » on 18 May 2008 at 9:26 AM (6 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



173 Comments   (+0 »)
   

Archived thread
 
2008-05-18 09:19:36 AM
If your Social Security number is numbers 457-55-5462, your you're identify has been stolen. Someone call Lifelock. Wait, isnt aint that Lifelocks CEO?

ftfy
/now they match 'Lifelocks'
 
2008-05-18 09:28:15 AM
I'm sure Rush Limbaugh and Paul Harvey will address this immediately...
 
2008-05-18 09:30:38 AM
Yeah, this just wasn't a smart move on his part. He's probably kicking himself in the ass right now.
 
2008-05-18 09:31:36 AM
Lifelock's
 
2008-05-18 09:32:04 AM
Ouch.
 
2008-05-18 09:32:48 AM
www.lifelock.com

fail
 
2008-05-18 09:32:52 AM
I don't like it when my identify gets stolen.
 
2008-05-18 09:33:44 AM
Richard 'Tard' Davis is more like it.
 
2008-05-18 09:33:45 AM
The West Virginia suit follows similar suits filed in New Jersey in March and Maryland in April. It asks the judge to certify it as a class-action suit.

The lawsuit was filed on behalf of Kevin Gerhold of Falling Waters, and maintains that there are numerous other state residents who were similarly misled into signing up.


that sumbiatch done us wrong, and we comes to collict!

hoox.files.wordpress.com
 
2008-05-18 09:34:01 AM
I came back to the US for a weekend back in March and upon being inundated with ads for Lifelock as soon as I touched down in Detroit (transferred to go to Boston, thank god) I figured either this guy had balls of steel or it was a huge scam.

Guess that answers that.
 
2008-05-18 09:34:46 AM
media001.g4tv.com

/I can has fail thread?
 
2008-05-18 09:35:06 AM
When I first saw that commercial, I was wondering how long it would take before I heard of something like this.
 
2008-05-18 09:36:07 AM
cpux:

When I first saw that commercial, I was wondering how long it would take before I heard of something like this.

Same here. What a freaking douchnozzle.
 
2008-05-18 09:36:28 AM
I'm waiting for the story on how he will never be able to repair his credit history.

But, let's face it, we *all* saw this one coming from miles away.
 
2008-05-18 09:37:14 AM
Kind of like credit card companies "offering" to hold you harmless from unauthorized purchases, when they are already required to under federal law.
 
2008-05-18 09:39:10 AM
- start company, promise 1 million payout
- have personal information compromised
- collect 1 million from own company
- PROFIT
 
2008-05-18 09:39:47 AM
I call bullshiat. 457-55-5462 is the SSN for Jose Manuel De la Torres. I just hired him as a roofer.
 
2008-05-18 09:39:51 AM
It's possible to get a new social security number, not terribly difficult for a CEO I'd imagine.

http://www.ssa.gov/pubs/10064.html

That being said, this guy is a giant douche bag and he deserves it.
 
2008-05-18 09:40:04 AM
I heard a while ago that it happened before, and the CEO sent some goons after the guy who stole it. Turns out the guy who stole it was mentally challenged.
 
2008-05-18 09:40:05 AM
If your Social Security number is 457-55-5462, your identify identity has been stolen. Someone call Lifelock. Wait, isnt that Lifelocks CEO?

FTFY
 
2008-05-18 09:40:09 AM
This bit made me laugh: "In Wisconsin, a woman's debit card was stolen, and that thief used that card to sign up for LifeLock,"
 
2008-05-18 09:41:22 AM
Tempting Fate is rarely a good idea.
 
2008-05-18 09:42:32 AM
******Don't post personal information on Fark of someone else no matter how easy the data is to find ******

/haha
 
2008-05-18 09:43:18 AM
Wogus Tempting Fate is rarely a good idea.

And thumbing your nose at it is even worse...
 
2008-05-18 09:44:44 AM
They're giving it away free? It must be good!
 
2008-05-18 09:45:20 AM
Yeah_Right: And thumbing your nose at it is even worse...

This guy was mooning Fate.
 
2008-05-18 09:46:51 AM
Yoda's Pen Is: I call bullshiat. 457-55-5462 is the SSN for Jose Manuel De la Torres. I just hired him as a roofer.

la migra! la migra!

( mass exodus from yoda pen's house )

... oh thats just the mailman. my bad.
 
KIA
2008-05-18 09:48:33 AM
Pondering:

If there are xxx-xx-xxxx digits in a SSN, that's a max of 999,999,999 - almost a billion numbers, right?

The US has a population of 300 million currently. How many have had numbers before and died? How many are being born?

When will we run out?

What will be used to replace it? 64-bit crypto IDs?

Maybe we shouldn't let the federal government require IDs and have full access to our personal finances... sure would be a lot easier to protect.
 
2008-05-18 09:49:50 AM
skankboy: ******Don't post personal information on Fark of someone else no matter how easy the data is to find ******

/haha


I'm guessing since everyone in the country knows about this, it really isn't personal anymore, and also it is in the article. Of course, that may not stop the admins from retooling the headline.
 
2008-05-18 09:51:36 AM
Basically, you could do exactly what they do yourself for free. Just call one or the other of the credit bureaus and ask that a fraud alert be placed on your file. You have to call regularly (monthly, I think) because they do expire rather quickly, but that was all these douches were doing anyway; just calling the credit bureaus for you.
 
2008-05-18 09:52:09 AM
KIA: Pondering:

If there are xxx-xx-xxxx digits in a SSN, that's a max of 999,999,999 - almost a billion numbers, right?

The US has a population of 300 million currently. How many have had numbers before and died? How many are being born?

When will we run out?

What will be used to replace it? 64-bit crypto IDs?

Maybe we shouldn't let the federal government require IDs and have full access to our personal finances... sure would be a lot easier to protect.


yeah you know that goddamn sonofabiatch reagan wants to put a russian chip in my brain and trade me to NAFTA for a goddam mexican robot to take over my job at the plant.
 
2008-05-18 09:52:48 AM
Yoda's Pen Is FTW!
 
2008-05-18 09:52:57 AM
KIA: Pondering:

If there are xxx-xx-xxxx digits in a SSN, that's a max of 999,999,999 - almost a billion numbers, right?

The US has a population of 300 million currently. How many have had numbers before and died? How many are being born?

When will we run out?

What will be used to replace it? 64-bit crypto IDs?

Maybe we shouldn't let the federal government require IDs and have full access to our personal finances... sure would be a lot easier to protect.


Actually *if* I did it right, there should be 1 trillion possible combinations to a social security number.

/feel free to correct if I am wrong
 
2008-05-18 09:53:21 AM
I laugh at your self-inflicted misfortune.
 
2008-05-18 09:54:04 AM
skankboy: ******Don't post personal information on Fark of someone else no matter how easy the data is to find ******

/haha


well, it was greened by an admin
 
2008-05-18 09:54:17 AM
Considering that Lifelock's founder was a scammer can anyone be surprised?
 
2008-05-18 09:55:49 AM
That was an interesting little read. The icing on the cake was the fact that they get your credit report from freecreditreport.com and you can't get another until a year later. That might be an indicator that the company isn't on the up-and-up.

Of course nobody knew that because none of the people that signed up for LifeLock read the contract they signed.
 
2008-05-18 09:56:43 AM
I was kinda sleepy and thought that was my SS# for a second.
 
2008-05-18 09:57:23 AM
KIA: Pondering:

If there are xxx-xx-xxxx digits in a SSN, that's a max of 999,999,999 - almost a billion numbers, right?

The US has a population of 300 million currently. How many have had numbers before and died? How many are being born?

When will we run out?

What will be used to replace it? 64-bit crypto IDs?

Maybe we shouldn't let the federal government require IDs and have full access to our personal finances... sure would be a lot easier to protect.


Wouldn't they just determine which are available after people die and begin reissuing them?
 
2008-05-18 09:58:34 AM
So far.. I've been quite pleased with Loudsiren. It's the solution states tend to pick when they botch handling sensitive data and have to give folks protection.

Possibly... not the best of endorsements, but I have seen a reduction in junk mail and like the fraud alert notice/call to verify system.
 
2008-05-18 09:58:53 AM
ought ought ought, ought ought, ought ought ought two...damn Roosevelt!
 
2008-05-18 09:59:02 AM
I'm Richard Todd Davis, CEO of LifeLock Inc., and I'm getting a kick out of this thread...... or AM I Richard Todd Davis, CEO of LifeLock Inc.???

/Or am I Spartacus?
 
2008-05-18 09:59:08 AM
epyonyx: Actually *if* I did it right, there should be 1 trillion possible combinations to a social security number.

/feel free to correct if I am wrong


9 digits with exactly 10 choices for each digit leaves 109 possibilities. So exactly 1 billion if you include 000-00-0000.
 
2008-05-18 10:01:12 AM
Good god, that company and its CEO is monstrous.

Sounds like the guy is a classic scam artist. I wouldn't be surprised if he just disappears after raiding the company treasury
 
2008-05-18 10:01:51 AM
Rann Xerox: /Or am I Spartacus?

no youre not . spartacus! left fark :-/
 
2008-05-18 10:04:12 AM
LandOfChocolate: Good god, that company and its CEO is monstrous.

Sounds like the guy is a classic scam artist. I wouldn't be surprised if he just disappears after raiding the company treasury


Reminded me of the story of Gizmondo and the Swedish guy who wrecked his Enzo.
 
2008-05-18 10:04:14 AM
And let us not forget that the fonder (not the CEO) of LifeLock was himself an identity thief. He fraudulently used his own father's ID. Nice.

As a security consultant I have always waved people away from LifeLock... and so naturally I'm getting a kick out of... blah blah blah.
 
2008-05-18 10:05:17 AM
TMBGfreak: epyonyx: Actually *if* I did it right, there should be 1 trillion possible combinations to a social security number.

/feel free to correct if I am wrong

9 digits with exactly 10 choices for each digit leaves 109 possibilities. So exactly 1 billion if you include 000-00-0000.


That's what I get for using the computer calculator.
 
2008-05-18 10:05:26 AM
TMBGfreak: 9 digits with exactly 10 choices for each digit leaves 109 possibilities. So exactly 1 billion if you include 000-00-0000.

They don't issue numbers where any of the 3 blocks are all zeros.
 
2008-05-18 10:06:32 AM
Steezy: That was an interesting little read. The icing on the cake was the fact that they get your credit report from freecreditreport.com and you can't get another until a year later. That might be an indicator that the company isn't on the up-and-up.

Of course nobody knew that because none of the people that signed up for LifeLock read the contract they signed.


Actually I think they are not referring to Freecreditreport.com (which isn't "technically" free, but I digress) but that they are talking about the truly free report everyone is entitled to through the federal gov't at annualcreditreport.com
From the article:
"In addition, the company fails to reveal that it obtains its credit reports by requesting on its clients' behalf their free annual credit report. That means consumers can't ask for their own free report for at least 12 months, according to the suit."

Either way though, it's total bullshiat that they got away with not informing their clients about this. That would piss me off more than anything right there!
 
2008-05-18 10:06:45 AM
Oddly enough, 457-55-5462 recently became my social security number.
 
2008-05-18 10:07:09 AM
Now someone needs to sue the consumer credit rating agencies because they are the ones the created this mess. They collect our info, make a profit selling it, and then expect us to not only protect it but assume liability for its existence.
 
2008-05-18 10:07:20 AM
THANK YOU!

That commercial came on the radio a while back and my son asked me if that wasn't a grotesquely idiotic thing to do.

He is going to be laughing his ass off.
 
2008-05-18 10:07:28 AM
I work in credit card application fraud so I'm really getting a kick out of these replies...

No really. I've always hated Lifelock and Debix - they're more hassle than they're worth since you can lock your credit just as easily by placing a fraud alert with the credit bureaus and save yourself monthly charges.

When I heard this commercial, I knew the SSN would be compromised in no time. Even with Lifelock an incompetent employee can push through an application (or be tricked into doing so by the fraudsters). Normally the major credit card companies have pretty secure fraud analysts, but I'd be willing to bet that smaller banks have much less secure fraud departments.
 
2008-05-18 10:10:59 AM
HA HA
 
2008-05-18 10:11:04 AM
Man... I think it is great somebody stole his identity. Those ads on T.V. were pretty annoying. He seemed to be taunting identity thieves.
 
2008-05-18 10:11:45 AM
epyonyx: TMBGfreak: epyonyx: Actually *if* I did it right, there should be 1 trillion possible combinations to a social security number.

/feel free to correct if I am wrong

9 digits with exactly 10 choices for each digit leaves 109 possibilities. So exactly 1 billion if you include 000-00-0000.

That's what I get for using the computer calculator.



Its been awhile since my last math class...but...dont you have to throw the formula : 9! in there somewhere (9x8x7x6...)
 
2008-05-18 10:11:49 AM
itdood
Now someone needs to sue the consumer credit rating agencies because they are the ones the created this mess. They collect our info, make a profit selling it, and then expect us to not only protect it but assume liability for its existence.

Agreed. Credit card companies generally do well when it comes to assuming liability for debt incurred via fraud, but the reporting agencies don't, and it can be a real fight to have fraudulent charges expunged from "your" record, involving court proceedings and lots of money. The fact is that it's their data, and if it's errors have inconvenienced you, they ought to have some 'splainin to do. Instead, though, they have lobbyists and lawyers.
 
2008-05-18 10:12:14 AM
did he get the million dollars, though?
 
2008-05-18 10:13:56 AM
KIA: Pondering:

If there are xxx-xx-xxxx digits in a SSN, that's a max of 999,999,999 - almost a billion numbers, right?

The US has a population of 300 million currently. How many have had numbers before and died? How many are being born?

When will we run out?


When our new president takes office and allows the issuing of Social Security numbers to all of the newly legal illegal aliens--and if not then, then when their "anchor babies" are born.
 
2008-05-18 10:14:08 AM
Ya know... I think this may be the new Definition of "Owned"
 
2008-05-18 10:15:08 AM
people are stupid to rely on schemes like lifelock. nothing's 100% safe and impermeable. remember the "quantum encryption" that was touted as impossible to break about a month or two ago? well, it's likely been broken. so if cutting edge crypto-tech can be busted what's the likelihood of stuff like lifelock being utter crapola?
 
2008-05-18 10:16:12 AM
question which will happen first?
A) the US will hit SSN 999-99-9999
B) A new system will take hold
C) The US and/or the World will cease to be before we hit 999-99-9999
 
2008-05-18 10:16:38 AM
cpux: When I first saw that commercial, I was wondering how long it would take before I heard of something like this.

Heh - me too. The man painted a big ole target on himself.
 
2008-05-18 10:16:45 AM
merlotguy:
- start company, promise 1 million payout
- have personal information compromised
- collect 1 million from own company
- PROFIT


Give that a little more development and it's actually pretty ingenious...

-transfer final assets worth ~$1m from the company to the "customer"
-with the company gutted, declare bankruptcy and fold
-on personal taxes, claim losses of the business failing
 
2008-05-18 10:18:27 AM
itdood Now someone needs to sue the consumer credit rating agencies because they are the ones the created this mess. They collect our info, make a profit selling it, and then expect us to not only protect it but assume liability for its existence.

This. And I think the credit reporting agencies should be made to accept 100 challenge questions that the individual person makes up, with the answers to those questions being supplied by the individual. When a credit request is made to these companies, the company must contact the person directly - and ask at least 5 of those questions at random, and if the responses don't match the answers -- credit is denied.

/yep ... it's a whole new level of complexity --- but it would severely knock down the level of fraud.
 
2008-05-18 10:18:35 AM
i23.photobucket.com
 
2008-05-18 10:19:54 AM
Damn, now he has to sell fish to tourists in t-shirts.
 
2008-05-18 10:21:00 AM
 
2008-05-18 10:25:00 AM
Identity theft is kinda scary. I work in a job where I brush up against it, at least, I have access to databases that give a shocking amount of information about everybody... your SSN, where you work, who you owe, who you bank with, etc. I also see how easy it is to get credit cards and other forms of credit. When I realize how easily someone could take out a mortgage in my name... it's just shocking it doesn't happen more often. The problem is covering your tracks and keeping the money you've stolen... which means being in organized crime, basically.
 
2008-05-18 10:27:35 AM
Actually if you write the problem out it's fairly rudimentary. The answer is 457 - 55 - 5462 = -5,060
 
2008-05-18 10:28:00 AM
I thought I was going to read about a 14yr old kid that hacked lifelocks ENTIRE DATABASE....Then everybody would get a free million dollars.
 
2008-05-18 10:28:10 AM
Firststepsadoozie: Damn, now he has to sell fish to tourists in t-shirts.

I lol'd.

/free credit report dot com
 
2008-05-18 10:28:18 AM
His phone number is 867-5309. I got it, I got it...
 
2008-05-18 10:29:49 AM
Napalm_in_the_morning:
Its been awhile since my last math class...but...dont you have to throw the formula : 9! in there somewhere (9x8x7x6...)


Been awhile since a had a math class as well, but I think you're confusing combinations and permutations. For example:
123-45-6789 is issued so 987-65-4321 couldn't be, or any other set that has those numbers, and occurrences. They don't do that with SS numbers.

I remember reading somewhere that the do reuse SS numbers after some period of time. I wanna say after the person had been dead for 50 years, but I'm not sure about that.
 
2008-05-18 10:29:49 AM
Firststepsadoozie: Damn, now he has to sell fish to tourists in t-shirts.

BWAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!! YEEEE-HA!

*Golf Clap*
 
2008-05-18 10:30:29 AM
LoneVVolf: merlotguy:
- start company, promise 1 million payout
- have personal information compromised
- collect 1 million from own company
- PROFIT

Give that a little more development and it's actually pretty ingenious...

-transfer final assets worth ~$1m from the company to the "customer"
-with the company gutted, declare bankruptcy and fold
-on personal taxes, claim losses of the business failing


Forgot one more step:

Sell personal information collected from all the customers to all the spammers, credit card companies, banks, political parties, non-profit orgs, PALs, AARP... Then collect and fly out to Belize or somewheres. Claim death and live happily, playing golf with Kenny boy Lay.
 
2008-05-18 10:33:49 AM
First time poster. Long time reader.

My question is: How the in hell did he get all the investment money to put the marketing blitz together. I have a great idea for a company that charges $100.00 a year for a service that is really non-existant. Do you think I can get any investors?
 
2008-05-18 10:38:25 AM
I worked as a temp at TCF Bank about 10 years ago, and had access to all SS numbers associated with any account, as well as mailing address and whatnot.

I could've set up 10 fraudulent identities per day, had I chosen.
 
2008-05-18 10:39:07 AM
skankboy: ******Don't post personal information on Fark of someone else no matter how easy the data is to find ******

/haha


Enjoy your ban.
 
2008-05-18 10:39:15 AM
Catran First time poster. Long time reader.

My question is: How the in hell did he get all the investment money to put the marketing blitz together. I have a great idea for a company that charges $100.00 a year for a service that is really non-existant. Do you think I can get any investors?


Leisure Suits. Pet Rocks. Tickle-Me-Elmo.

American's love gimmicks and fads. There are always people to be duped into buying things they don't need.

/and there are plenty of slimy characters willing to put up a few bucks for the opportunity to exploit the masses.
 
2008-05-18 10:40:56 AM
I'm still waiting for the day some hacker gets in to some database with ALL of our SS#'s and then torrents all of them on to Pirate Bay.

/It's going to happen
 
2008-05-18 10:43:35 AM
"This is a service that you pay for and it kind of lays dormant," said David Paris, an attorney with the New Jersey firm Marks & Klein who is heading the case against LifeLock. "So no one knows that they're not getting what they paid for, because they don't know what to look for."

But yet they still gave the man $110 a year. Your clients are suckers.
 
2008-05-18 10:44:50 AM
"Furthermore, a simple background check performed using Davis' Social Security number reveals that his entire personal profile has been compromised to the extent that the birth date associated with his Social Security number is Nov. 2, 1940, which would [inaccurately] make Davis 67 years old."

Am I the only one who doesn't understand this sentence? Using Davis's social security number, they couldn't find Davis's correct birthdate -- which makes the Lifelock system flawed...how?
 
2008-05-18 10:47:05 AM
rvesco: Using Davis's social security number, they couldn't find Davis's correct birthdate -- which makes the Lifelock system flawed...how?

His number has been stolen so many times that the Social Security Administration has changed his recorded birthdate to one of the people who stole it. I think the 20 different DLs was the more telling part though.
 
2008-05-18 10:48:05 AM
rvesco: "Furthermore, a simple background check performed using Davis' Social Security number reveals that his entire personal profile has been compromised to the extent that the birth date associated with his Social Security number is Nov. 2, 1940, which would [inaccurately] make Davis 67 years old."

Am I the only one who doesn't understand this sentence? Using Davis's social security number, they couldn't find Davis's correct birthdate -- which makes the Lifelock system flawed...how?


I assume because someone managed to steal this person's identity and get the birthday changed in some records somewhere.

The scammer probably did it so when asked for his birthday it'd be easier to remember since it really was his...
 
2008-05-18 10:48:53 AM
Firststepsadoozie: Damn, now he has to sell fish to tourists in t-shirts.

That song is now permanently stuck in my head.
 
2008-05-18 10:51:42 AM
When I was going to college, the professors used to post our grades by SSN. I guess identity theft wasn't as big a deal back then, but one thing I found funny was that the computers would not accept zero as the first number in a SSN, therefore instead of 048-xx-xxxx I was 448-xx-xxxx. I wonder who my evil twin that got all those good grades in college is?
 
2008-05-18 10:52:48 AM
Zalan
This bit made me laugh: "In Wisconsin, a woman's debit card was stolen, and that thief used that card to sign up for LifeLock,"

That's actually pretty brilliant; the theif may have just locked her out of her own identity.

Lifelock and other similar services rely on "fraud altert"s to protect accounts, which among other things, requires credit issuing agencies to call your phone number before issuing credit, which would actually do the job, if companies issuing credit actually followed through and did their job properly.

KvanCetreI work in credit card application fraud so I'm really getting a kick out of these replies...

When I heard this commercial, I knew the SSN would be compromised in no time. Even with Lifelock an incompetent employee can push through an application (or be tricked into doing so by the fraudsters). Normally the major credit card companies have pretty secure fraud analysts, but I'd be willing to bet that smaller banks have much less secure fraud departments.


A lot of companies just throw credit papers around as if they were on fire. Either they are incompotent, or the money lost through fraud isn't sufficient to make double-checking worthwhile (e.g. Blockbuster Rentals).

This means scammers can steal identities and pander to all of the stupid companies, making fraud alerts almost worthless. There needs to be a law requiring credit-issue companies to respect fraud alerts, and force them to eat the loss if they issue credit while the fraud alert is in place.
 
2008-05-18 10:54:08 AM
Lifelock is a huge rip-off. You can request to freeze your credit from all three reporting companies. It costs around $10-$20 each, some states are free. And it is not a yearly fee either.

Sure, there is some hassle applying for new credit, but it is a lot better than some stranger having easy access, even with Lifelock.
 
2008-05-18 10:58:19 AM
All a fraud alert does is give creditors your phone number and they are suppose to call you to verify that you are the one applying for credit. Quite frankly, I believe this should be a free service offered directly through the credit bureaus anyway, since ID theft is so rampant.

I only signed my family up for life-lock because it turned out to be less expensive and less work than doing it individually through each bureau. We had mortgage papers mysteriously disappear after DHL delivered them to the wrong house, so a fraud alert was necessary.

Unfortunately, I think it will work about as well as putting "ask for ID" on the back of your credit card. Rarely anybody ever checks.
 
2008-05-18 10:59:48 AM
To all:

SSNs are reused after someone has died. I don't recall exactly, but I believe they wait about 50 years to reuse them.
 
2008-05-18 11:04:55 AM
itdood: Now someone needs to sue the consumer credit rating agencies because they are the ones the created this mess. They collect our info, make a profit selling it, and then expect us to not only protect it but assume liability for its existence.

I hate the credit rating agencies, and I have never checked my credit rating. WTF is this all about? They have lots and lots of information about you--important information that can impact your life--and you're not really allowed to know what it is. You can't change it if it's wrong. They're selling your personal information, yet YOU can't have access to the information.

DIAF, credit agencies. The one time I had a fraudulent charge on a credit card and tried to have it fixed, I had to go thru the Better Business Bureau.

If I'm looking for credit, I go ask for it. So far I have more credit than I need, and I never deal with these idiots at all.
 
2008-05-18 11:15:42 AM
www.global-air.com
 
2008-05-18 11:17:50 AM
Whoever that was that brought up 9!...that only applies if you're removing each number after it's been used, ie..."Okay, we already have a 6, no more sixes allowed, now we're down to 9 choices. Alright, second number is a 2, no more 2s, now we're down to 8 choices." SSNs repeat numbers, so it's just 109
 
2008-05-18 11:18:00 AM
Even if we reuse SSN's after that person expires, we'll still get to over a billion people in this country. Just look at China. Of course then we could just start using the alphabet in addition to the numerals, and end up with a system that has 36^9 and be fine for a while longer. Or add more digits. Either way.


This is of course oil wars, global warming, ice ages, asteroids, rampant herpes, Skynets, aliens, scientologists, or other threats don't get us before that point.
 
2008-05-18 11:24:56 AM
AnnoyingKidNextDoor: skankboy: ******Don't post personal information on Fark of someone else no matter how easy the data is to find ******

/haha

Enjoy your ban.


also

*Don't discuss bans in the threads.*
http://www.fark.com/farq/posting.shtml
 
2008-05-18 11:25:38 AM
Everyone should create a PGP/GPG key when turn 16. Then use that key to verify their identity to all pertinent entities.
 
2008-05-18 11:29:02 AM
larsalan: AnnoyingKidNextDoor: skankboy: ******Don't post personal information on Fark of someone else no matter how easy the data is to find ******

/haha

Enjoy your ban.

also

*Don't discuss bans in the threads.*
http://www.fark.com/farq/posting.shtml


I believe that was a reference to a roll-on deoderant

/and you have my stapler
 
2008-05-18 11:30:43 AM
Currently, a valid SSN cannot have an area number above 772, the highest area number which the Social Security Administration has allocated.

There are also special numbers which will never be allocated:

Numbers with all zeros in any digit group (000-xx-####, ###-00-####, ###-xx-0000).
Numbers of the form 666-xx-####, probably due to the potential controversy (see Number of the Beast).
Numbers from 987-65-4320 to 987-65-4329 are reserved for use in advertisements.


Hilda Whitcher 078-05-1120
Grace D. Owen 001-01-0001
Richard 'Tard' Davis 457-55-5462
 
2008-05-18 11:33:19 AM
slobarnuts: Everyone should create a PGP/GPG key when turn 16. Then use that key to verify their identity to all pertinent entities.

Double this. The system is broken and we're not doing shiat to fix it. Oooh, "stop giving out your social security number to 'prove' your identity." OK, so what do we give instead? Our mother's maiden name and our dog's blood type? Awesome. Not like that's vulnerable to the same replay attacks as the SSN...
 
2008-05-18 11:36:02 AM
Yeah_Right: Catran First time poster. Long time reader.

My question is: How the in hell did he get all the investment money to put the marketing blitz together. I have a great idea for a company that charges $100.00 a year for a service that is really non-existant. Do you think I can get any investors?

Leisure Suits. Pet Rocks. Tickle-Me-Elmo.

American's love gimmicks and fads. There are always people to be duped into buying things they don't need.

/and there are plenty of slimy characters willing to put up a few bucks for the opportunity to exploit the masses.


There are also plenty of investors who are as easily duped as the average consumer...
 
2008-05-18 11:38:17 AM
Paris said that consumers can activatecook their own meals at home for free, but the company fails to mention that in its marketing campaign.

You can say that about most service industries.
 
2008-05-18 11:38:23 AM
KIA: Pondering:

If there are xxx-xx-xxxx digits in a SSN, that's a max of 999,999,999 - almost a billion numbers, right?

The US has a population of 300 million currently. How many have had numbers before and died? How many are being born?



ah, no.
 
2008-05-18 11:39:27 AM
It's uncanny how many times I'll look who wrote a decent news story and it turns out to be Andrew Clevenger.

/No, I'm not his mom.
 
2008-05-18 11:40:20 AM
KIA: The US has a population of 300 million currently. How many have had numbers before and died? How many are being born?

About 77 million.

Like everyone else has said, our SSN should be our public key, and we should all have a private key that is in some way a mathematical representation of DNA.

oukewldave: SSNs are reused after someone has died. I don't recall exactly, but I believe they wait about 50 years to reuse them.

Nope. Not true. (new window) The SS administration does not re-use numbers.
 
2008-05-18 11:41:21 AM
wendaydream: Unfortunately, I think it will work about as well as putting "ask for ID" on the back of your credit card. Rarely anybody ever checks.

I have a card with my picture on it. I don't think anyone ever really checks it either and my freaking picture is right on top of the card.
 
2008-05-18 12:02:48 PM
This previous expose on him. He's a career con man who's even conned his family.

http://www.phoenixnewtimes.com/2007...pened-in-vegas/
 
2008-05-18 12:04:16 PM
I remember seeing those commercials, I knew it would happen sooner or later.
i126.photobucket.com
 
2008-05-18 12:05:37 PM
 
2008-05-18 12:09:30 PM
The SSA does NOT recycle SSNs:Link (new window)

"Are Social Security numbers re-assigned after a person dies?

No. We do not re-assign Social Security numbers. We have assigned more than 442 million Social Security numbers and each year we assign about 5.5 million new numbers. Even so, the current system will provide us with enough new numbers for several generations into the future."
 
2008-05-18 12:11:14 PM
Is the Ironic tag broken?
 
2008-05-18 12:11:57 PM
When I first saw the ad for LifeLock, I thought, this is about as stupid as it gets....It's like Microsoft saying that WGA will stop piracy. Laying down a challenge is something webkitties just love to
break. I'm surprised it didn't happen within a couple of days of the first airing of the commercials.
Now, they are about at irritating as those stupid "billy maze" Kaboom commercials.
 
2008-05-18 12:16:31 PM
nuclear_asshat: The SS administration does not re-use numbers.

From SSN: not so unique

There's one other situation where the Social Security Administration issues a replacement number: when more than one person has been assigned, or is using, the same SSN. The most infamous case of that was 078-05-1120, which was used on a "sample" Social Security card by a wallet manufacturer. At one point, more than 5,700 people were using that number as their SSN.

A previous poster mentioned about having a billion unique ids - that's not quite true as the first 3 numbers represent a year range and a birthplace (or where you were when the SSN was issued). That's why if you stay in the same general area most of your life a lot of people will have the first three numbers.
 
2008-05-18 12:22:27 PM
HA HA! FAIL!
 
2008-05-18 12:25:40 PM
"I think it will work about as well as putting "ask for ID" on the back of your credit card"

The agreements credit card companies make with stores says that the store is not allowed to ask for ID to confirm card ownership.

/don't know how to quote
/DO know how to slashie
 
2008-05-18 12:25:58 PM
it was bound to happen.
 
2008-05-18 12:29:22 PM
I think my social security number is 5. Let me ask...
 
2008-05-18 12:29:22 PM
Goodfella: Is the Ironic tag broken?

No. You see here, many Farkers and Farkettes were expecting this to happen, so it is obvious, not ironic. Ironic is when you don't expect something to happen.

Now back to somewhat of a topic. Everyone is supposed to have a social security number that is only theirs, but through identity-theft, the wallet SSN incident, and mistakes, there are cases where two people may have the same SSN. If there were no restrictions on what an SSN can be besides that it is 9 digits long, we would have 109 possible social security numbers. Of course, there are restrictions, so we need to remove the numbers that fall into the "restricted" categories.
 
2008-05-18 12:43:25 PM
As soon as I saw those commercials with that one guy advertising his social security number, I knew this wasn't going to end well.
 
2008-05-18 12:46:56 PM
Yeah_Right: Leisure Suits. Pet Rocks. Tickle-Me-Elmo.

American's love gimmicks and fads. There are always people to be duped into buying things they don't need.

/and there are plenty of slimy characters willing to put up a few bucks for the opportunity to exploit the masses.


You see it would be this mat with "conclusions" on it that you could jump to!
 
2008-05-18 12:48:58 PM
lelio:

A previous poster mentioned about having a billion unique ids - that's not quite true as the first 3 numbers represent a year range and a birthplace (or where you were when the SSN was issued). That's why if you stay in the same general area most of your life a lot of people will have the first three numbers.


Known that for years, my SSN starts with 5 because it was issued in California, and my ex's stars with 2 because hers was issued in Virginia.

so the number of SSN numbers is NOT 1 billion.

/too lazy to do the math
 
2008-05-18 01:03:30 PM
jst3p Yeah_Right: Leisure Suits. Pet Rocks. Tickle-Me-Elmo.

American's love gimmicks and fads. There are always people to be duped into buying things they don't need.

/and there are plenty of slimy characters willing to put up a few bucks for the opportunity to exploit the masses.

You see it would be this mat with "conclusions" on it that you could jump to!


The 'conclusion' being that there are plenty of slimy characters willing to put up a few bucks for the opportunity to exploit the masses...? Are you naive enough to beleive that everyone gets into ventures with nothing but pure intentions at heart?

/ there is good reason for everyone to know and understand the phrase "caveat emptor."
 
2008-05-18 01:08:43 PM
RevMark: As a security consultant

how much does that scam pay?
 
2008-05-18 01:18:19 PM
Yeah_Right: jst3p Yeah_Right: Leisure Suits. Pet Rocks. Tickle-Me-Elmo.

American's love gimmicks and fads. There are always people to be duped into buying things they don't need.

/and there are plenty of slimy characters willing to put up a few bucks for the opportunity to exploit the masses.

You see it would be this mat with "conclusions" on it that you could jump to!

The 'conclusion' being that there are plenty of slimy characters willing to put up a few bucks for the opportunity to exploit the masses...? Are you naive enough to beleive that everyone gets into ventures with nothing but pure intentions at heart?

/ there is good reason for everyone to know and understand the phrase "caveat emptor."


Dude...watch Office Space...that's all you need to know about jst3p's comment.
 
2008-05-18 01:22:47 PM
orat-on-a-stick: lelio:

A previous poster mentioned about having a billion unique ids - that's not quite true as the first 3 numbers represent a year range and a birthplace (or where you were when the SSN was issued). That's why if you stay in the same general area most of your life a lot of people will have the first three numbers.

Known that for years, my SSN starts with 5 because it was issued in California, and my ex's stars with 2 because hers was issued in Virginia.

so the number of SSN numbers is NOT 1 billion.

/too lazy to do the math


But really, how does that matter any at all? You still have a billion numbers. Just 200 million (ish) are allocated for use in the Northeast, 200 million in the South, 200 million in the Central US, 200 million in the West and 200 million yet to be allocated. Not to mention that people move all over the place after they get their SSN (when they're one or two years old).

Where they're allocated has nothing to do with how many there are. It's like I have 1000 M&Ms, but all the green ones are in one bowl, the blue ones in another bowl, and the red ones are all in my sock. ...I still have 1000 M&Ms, it doesn't matter where they are cause I can still get them all.
 
2008-05-18 01:23:27 PM
The Arizona-headquartered company does place and renew fraud alerts on its subscribers' credit profiles. But it does nothing to combat breaches involving personal bank, employment or medical information, as well as theft pertaining to government documents and benefits, the suit alleges.

So it does nothing you couldn't do yourself in a few minutes.
 
2008-05-18 01:46:50 PM
algrant33:

But really, how does that matter any at all? You still have a billion numbers. Just 200 million (ish) are allocated for use in the Northeast, 200 million in the South, 200 million in the Central US, 200 million in the West and 200 million yet to be allocated. Not to mention that people move all over the place after they get their SSN (when they're one or two years old).

Where they're allocated has nothing to do with how many there are. It's like I have 1000 M&Ms, but all the green ones are in one bowl, the blue ones in another bowl, and the red ones are all in my sock. ...I still have 1000 M&Ms, it doesn't matter where they are cause I can still get them all.


I see your point.


/you keep red M&Ms in your sock??
 
2008-05-18 02:06:22 PM
Napalm_in_the_morning:

Its been awhile since my last math class...but...dont you have to throw the formula : 9! in there somewhere (9x8x7x6...)


Factorials were my favorite part of math class because instead of saying "nine factorial" I just yelled "NINE!!!!"

I don't think my teacher liked me very much.
 
2008-05-18 02:08:17 PM
Aww...Not This Crap...Again!: KIA: Pondering:

If there are xxx-xx-xxxx digits in a SSN, that's a max of 999,999,999 - almost a billion numbers, right?

The US has a population of 300 million currently. How many have had numbers before and died? How many are being born?

When will we run out?


Well, I don't think you can reuse them. That would be confusing even if the person is long dead. There would be 2 records for that SSN alias which messed up the database big time. The whole POINT of SSN is to uniquely, unambiguously identify people (which can't be done by full name alone).

Hmm... they'll either have to add a number or start using letters! In which case it's like the Y2K problem all over again, as banks scramble to temp-hire people to patch their databases.
 
2008-05-18 02:12:17 PM
scottydoesntknow: Yeah_Right: jst3p Yeah_Right: Leisure Suits. Pet Rocks. Tickle-Me-Elmo.

American's love gimmicks and fads. There are always people to be duped into buying things they don't need.

/and there are plenty of slimy characters willing to put up a few bucks for the opportunity to exploit the masses.

You see it would be this mat with "conclusions" on it that you could jump to!

The 'conclusion' being that there are plenty of slimy characters willing to put up a few bucks for the opportunity to exploit the masses...? Are you naive enough to beleive that everyone gets into ventures with nothing but pure intentions at heart?

/ there is good reason for everyone to know and understand the phrase "caveat emptor."

Dude...watch Office Space...that's all you need to know about jst3p's comment.


I think that shipment of fail that was delivered earlier was intended for Yeah_Right.
 
2008-05-18 02:38:13 PM
1. Go on tv giving out social
2. Borrow millions of dollars against your sham company and other assets
3. Claim widespread identity theft due to your number being on tv and pocket the money?
 
2008-05-18 02:40:05 PM
krcotter 2008-05-18 11:30:43 AM
Currently, a valid SSN cannot have an area number above 772
And, on a related note, SSN-772 is the USS Greenville. Best known for trying to show off with an emergency surfacing maneuver for onboard politicians, and ending off ramming a Japanese fishing boat just off of O'ahu. Then managing to hit a reef a few months later.

/just something apt about those numbers lining up with the "Bad Luck Boat of Pearl Harbor"
 
exi
2008-05-18 03:04:43 PM
Further strengthens my theory that there is a strong negative correlation between the stridency with which something is promoted and its actual value.
 
2008-05-18 03:09:46 PM
exi: Further strengthens my theory that there is a strong negative correlation between the stridency with which something is promoted and its actual value.


Your ideas intrigue me, and I wish to subscribe to your newsletter....
 
2008-05-18 03:21:03 PM
You know, I *wondered* why I suddenly had three guys named Rick Davis start working for me.. So you mean it's not actually the second most common name in Colombia?
 
2008-05-18 03:21:14 PM
My home county....woo hoo!
 
2008-05-18 03:38:23 PM
Late night TV ads that offer no meaningful service turn out to be a scam? Who knew?
 
2008-05-18 03:39:19 PM
MIguy: TMBGfreak: 9 digits with exactly 10 choices for each digit leaves 109 possibilities. So exactly 1 billion if you include 000-00-0000.

They don't issue numbers where any of the 3 blocks are all zeros.


shiat, now I have to break out the combinatorics again.
 
2008-05-18 03:51:15 PM
I once my Fark identity stolen. Any post that made me sound like a douchebag was that guy.

/or was it?
 
2008-05-18 03:55:07 PM
Daraymann: MIguy: TMBGfreak: 9 digits with exactly 10 choices for each digit leaves 109 possibilities. So exactly 1 billion if you include 000-00-0000.

They don't issue numbers where any of the 3 blocks are all zeros.

shiat, now I have to break out the combinatorics again.


Well, you subtract (107 + 106 + 105) for the one block of zeros case, add (104 + 103 + 102) for the two blocks of zeros cases that were double counted and subtract 1 for the all zero case which was triple counted and triple compensated for.

Therefore you get
109 - (107 + 106 + 105) + (104 + 103 + 102) - 1

/I think
//haven't used my Discrete Math in over a year
 
2008-05-18 04:03:20 PM
Here's the problem. SSNs is for social security & your taxes & stuff. It should NEVER be used for anything else, period. Your gym doesn't need to know your SSN. Your college professor should not be posting grades based on SSN. Your STD results should not be referenced via SSN. And we wonder why identity theft is so common. We use the SSN as a conduit/lookup for EVERYTHING.
 
2008-05-18 04:10:30 PM
Well, people with really bad credit could sell their SSN for profit.

Also, people who are on the Sex Offender Registry could distribute their SSN and just say, "it wasn't me honey, it was Juan because of identity theft!"
 
2008-05-18 04:35:27 PM
Upon reading this article, I have only one response:

DUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUHHH!
 
2008-05-18 05:48:53 PM
This is the best news that I have heard all day.
 
2008-05-18 05:59:44 PM
AnnoyingKidNextDoor: Enjoy your ban.

My Ban Roll-on? It does help hide when I am nervous inside.
 
2008-05-18 06:07:00 PM
I'm guessing since everyone in the country knows about this has used it to get a credit card, it really isn't personal anymore

FTFY
 
2008-05-18 06:42:57 PM
ah3133: KIA: Pondering:

If there are xxx-xx-xxxx digits in a SSN, that's a max of 999,999,999 - almost a billion numbers, right?

The US has a population of 300 million currently. How many have had numbers before and died? How many are being born?

When will we run out?

What will be used to replace it? 64-bit crypto IDs?

Maybe we shouldn't let the federal government require IDs and have full access to our personal finances... sure would be a lot easier to protect.

yeah you know that goddamn sonofabiatch reagan wants to put a russian chip in my brain and trade me to NAFTA for a goddam mexican robot to take over my job at the plant.


assuming they use 0's in ssn's the actual combination of numbers is 10 billion.

I don't think we'll be running out any time soon
 
2008-05-18 06:43:26 PM
i232.photobucket.com
 
2008-05-18 06:44:27 PM
disregard that last post, my math's are not in the game while I'm at work
 
2008-05-18 08:24:46 PM
Napalm_in_the_morning: epyonyx: TMBGfreak: epyonyx: Actually *if* I did it right, there should be 1 trillion possible combinations to a social security number.

/feel free to correct if I am wrong

9 digits with exactly 10 choices for each digit leaves 109 possibilities. So exactly 1 billion if you include 000-00-0000.

That's what I get for using the computer calculator.


Its been awhile since my last math class...but...dont you have to throw the formula : 9! in there somewhere (9x8x7x6...)



Oh my god I can't believe the level of fail in the math skills in here.

How many numbers are there between 0 and 9 (inclusive) ...
10, right? i.e. you can count to 9, and then including 0 there are ten numbers in total. If you didn't get that you're an idiot.

How many numbers are there between 0 and 999 (inclusive)
1000. Starting to see the pattern?

How many numbers are there between 0 and 999,999,999?
 
2008-05-18 08:41:38 PM
Next you'll tell me that pill doesn't really make your penis larger.
 
2008-05-18 09:30:09 PM
Richard Todd Davis, CEO of LifeLock Inc. is a major league idiot.
 
2008-05-18 10:10:33 PM
lindseyp:

Oh my god I can't believe the level of fail in the math skills in here.

How many numbers are there between 0 and 9 (inclusive) ...
10, right? i.e. you can count to 9, and then including 0 there are ten numbers in total. If you didn't get that you're an idiot.

How many numbers are there between 0 and 999 (inclusive)
1000. Starting to see the pattern?

How many numbers are there between 0 and 999,999,999?


Thank you.

It is less, since you have to remove any group which is all 0. Additionally, there are some blocks reserved for temporary social security cards, like the ones issued to foreign students. They might have a letter appended to them though.

Either way, they are recycled after a certain period.
 
2008-05-18 10:44:18 PM
An tSaoi

Fark has that filter too:

XXX-XX-XXXX
 
2008-05-18 11:20:52 PM
jeblis: An tSaoi

Fark has that filter too:

XXX-XX-XXXX


457-55-5462
 
2008-05-19 12:27:28 AM
Witty Handle: jeblis: An tSaoi

Fark has that filter too:

XXX-XX-XXXX

457-55-5462


*writes that down* YES!!
 
2008-05-19 12:30:17 AM
When someone can make a 4x4 hybrid (need off-road capabilities for work), I'll try to afford one. My latest job takes me 360 miles one way from home, at least I get mileage reimbursed.

/Too much smug in this thread
 
2008-05-19 12:31:06 AM
opps wrong thread
 
2008-05-19 03:24:52 AM
I wouldn't trust them as far as I can throw an identity theft purchased vehicle. I mean come on, go to their enrollment page, enter ' or (1 = 1)--' as your promotion code https://secure.lifelock.com/enrollmentform.aspx ... then tell me if you'd feel safe, even if it were free
 
2008-05-19 03:31:05 AM
strathmeyer: Late night TV ads that offer no meaningful service turn out to be a scam? Who knew?

Next you'll tell me that those hawties on late night TV are only talking to me for my US$3.99 a minute.
 
2008-05-19 07:14:49 AM
cpux: When I first saw that commercial, I was wondering how long it would take before I heard of something like this.

same here and now we know...
 
2008-05-19 08:36:55 AM
lindseyp: Napalm_in_the_morning: epyonyx: TMBGfreak: epyonyx: Actually *if* I did it right, there should be 1 trillion possible combinations to a social security number.

/feel free to correct if I am wrong

9 digits with exactly 10 choices for each digit leaves 109 possibilities. So exactly 1 billion if you include 000-00-0000.

That's what I get for using the computer calculator.


Its been awhile since my last math class...but...dont you have to throw the formula : 9! in there somewhere (9x8x7x6...)


Oh my god I can't believe the level of fail in the math skills in here.

How many numbers are there between 0 and 9 (inclusive) ...
10, right? i.e. you can count to 9, and then including 0 there are ten numbers in total. If you didn't get that you're an idiot.

How many numbers are there between 0 and 999 (inclusive)
1000. Starting to see the pattern?

How many numbers are there between 0 and 999,999,999?


How many times can a number be repeated within a sequence moran?
 
2008-05-19 08:41:06 AM
Enzyte works if I can convince myself that it does. Lord knows it cost me a bundle, they keep sending it to me no matter how much I complain and my wife still calls me "pussy-willow".

Shiat.
 
2008-05-19 10:51:26 AM
This was an article in the Phoenix New Times (new window) alerting to LifeLock and its mis-deeds a year ago!
 
2008-05-19 11:11:24 AM
For everybody who's heard of "freecreditreport.com," I recommend you go instead to "annualcreditreport.com." It's operated by the same people, it's also free, but it doesn't suck you into some subscription service.

They had to offer the no-strings annualcreditreport.com due to lawsuits over the "credit advantage" service people were being tricked into signing up for.
 
2008-05-19 11:33:55 AM
upload.wikimedia.org

Whoops, hang on... wrong pic... :)
 
2008-05-19 04:22:37 PM
Here's some research for those that still want to know how many SSNs there are:

http://www.socialsecurity.gov/employer/stateweb.htm (new window)

You will never get a 000-XX-XXXX number. They're not valid. So eliminate a million options from the pool. Also, several blocks of numbers that might be usable haven't been assigned. There are no 590-XX-XXXX numbers issued yet (if I read this right and it's updated).

http://www.socialsecurity.gov/history/ssn/geocard.html (new window)

The middle two digits can be anything from 00 to 99, so 100 possibilities.

The last four digits can be anything from 0000 to 9999, so ten-thousand possibilities. There doesn't appear to be any restriction on repeats or the number of times a digit can appear in a SSN.

So, the second two groups -XX-XXXX are (100 * 10000) possibilities, or 10^6, or one million possible combinations.

Skimming the area codes, I see values between 001 and 765, so 764 options. Not sure if values > 765 are allowed and just unused, but that means you could have 765,000,000 SSNs in circulation at any given time without having to alter or change the numbering scheme, and probably around 500,000,000 actually defined for the various area, group and serial codes (at a guess).

So, based on that, our CEO applied for his SSN from Texas...

I'm hoping this works out as a "Research FTW!"
 
2008-05-19 04:34:04 PM
XXX-XX-XXXX

Isn't that what Japanese porn movies are rated?
 
2008-05-19 05:04:09 PM
lukelightning: XXX-XX-XXXX
Isn't that what Japanese porn movies are rated?


Tentacle porn would have 8 or 10 "X"s, I would think ...
/Do do much of it -- thinking, that is.
tbn0.google.com (new TAB)
 
2008-05-19 05:11:59 PM
There's no such thing as "Identity Theft".
If there were, there'd be thousands of people running-around with NO "Identity".
What you are all talking about is CREDIT-FRAUD.
It's a farking scam perpetrated by credit-issuers & data-mining credit agencies and enabled by law-enforcement, for the purpose of predatory lending and getting consumers to cough-up more dough. Just like the farking BBB, the credit agencies are in-place to support the interests of corporations over individuals' rights -- to Prevent Actual Real People from getting Fair Treatment. The Mere Existence of these crooked agencies Prevents Bona-Fide Consumers' Interests Groups from gaining a substantial foothold in business practice. Look-over ANY contract you've been offered (including employment applications, which aren't even binding contracts) lately and you will find not only the bullshiat Hold-Harmless, but a supposedly "Binding" Arbitration Clause. Lawyers and Judges go right-along like good soldiers and refuse to hear motions on any dispute, including voiding the Arbitration Clause, until you've Been Through said "Lender/Employer/Lessor-chosen, consumer-paid" arbitration and lost.

They should publish everybody's damn SSN like a phonebook, then see what the credit companies can think-of to fark-over their customers. It's pretty damn simple - require ID AND a signature. If a charge ain't got my siggie, GTFO.

Steal $1000 in merchandise or cash and it's a Class-A misdemeanor. Buy a pack of gum with someone else's credit card, they claim you were not authorized, it's a Class-3 FELONY. UNLESS IT'S DONE BY A MERCHANT. Why??

Another thing; that "signature card" your bank has on your checking and savings accounts? They don't use it -- sign Ronald MacDonald on one of your checks and just see if it don't sail right-through.

/Just got through a car purchase. farking Finance guys told me I had no "Car Credit" cause I always paid cash for my cars. I told 2 of them, "I could buy your damn car on a credit card. That's called 'Unsecured Credit'. Just give me the 'Yes' or 'No' douchebag". It was 'Yes' everytime. I paid cash anyway; fark if I'll have some damn bank holding my car title over me.
 
2008-05-21 12:53:15 PM
LycanDID: You will never get a 000-XX-XXXX number. They're not valid. So eliminate a million options from the pool. Also, several blocks of numbers that might be usable haven't been assigned. There are no 590-XX-XXXX numbers issued yet (if I read this right and it's updated).

Wrong. 590 is for Florida from the 70's. Two of my siblings' numbers start with 590. Mine was applied for earlier since I'm older and I have 589-xxx-xxxx.

All social security numbers hint at what state you're from and when your number was applied for. I'm 32, and my sibs are a couple of years younger.
 
2008-05-22 02:48:37 AM
cool
 
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