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(KnoxNews)   If you were homeschooled and now work for the State of Tennessee, the Department of Education would like a word with you   (knoxnews.com) divider line 132
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16634 clicks; posted to Main » on 09 May 2008 at 1:56 PM (6 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2008-05-09 02:29:38 PM
As I am incompetent, homeschooled, a drug dealer, naked, and a law enforcement officer, I'm getting a kick out of these replies.


Penis.
 
2008-05-09 02:30:52 PM
According to Maxim Magazine the 3 R's are:

Roping

Rogering

R'martial Arts.
 
2008-05-09 02:30:53 PM
JWNevin Quote 2008-05-09 02:08:47 PM


As an advocate of private schooling in the classical method, and an hearty opponent of gub'mint schools, I have a hard time deciding where to come down on the homeschooling issue. It has its strengths and weaknesses, I'm sure...

But if you want to, for the purpose of credentialing, give everyone the same aptitude test upon completion of their cirriculum - homeschooled, private schooled, government schooled - and let that be your standard.

Oh wait. You don't want to do that because you are afraid of the failure percentage of the government school. Okay, I see what this is about.


THIS.

I knew there had to be somebody on this thread not having a little orgiastic redneck Christian hate fantasy.

Most homeschooled kids could score in the top half of students taking a proficiency test- ad should be required to pass a minimum standard.

But I doubt that'll make any difference to the NEA, which will still be out there trying to shut down the competition.
 
2008-05-09 02:31:18 PM
slappydoodad: For fook's sake I hope there are not cops out there who could not obtain a GED if required.

Yeah -- but it wasn't required when they got the job, and now through a different interpretation of the law, they will lose their jobs. Doesn't matter whether they could pass it or not.
 
2008-05-09 02:31:20 PM
malibupetey: Where you educate your kids depends on what you want them to learn.

In my experience everything I had to unlearn, so that I could have a truer understanding of people, places and things, was taught to me in public schools.


WTF did you have to 'unlearn'? They fark up the times tables on you?

I hate bullshiat blanket statements like that.

Of course you are going to learn other things and go deeper into different topics outside of school. Did you expect to graduate knowing everything about everything and with a full boat of life experiences?
 
2008-05-09 02:34:01 PM
When I was in 5th grade there was this new kid named Junior that was home schooled all his life up until his mom got a job and had to send him to public school.
The kid was real quiet and shy, but everybody was pretty nice to him and tried to make him feel comfortable the first day he arrived.
The second day, however, was a bit different. While we were all sitting quietly taking a test or something, Junior went to the corner of the room and removed all of his clothes. It wasn't until the test was over that somebody noticed.
Everybody started laughing and the girls started screaming when he had to get up and put his clothes back on.
Apparently, from what I heard, the kid was used to being naked when being homeschooled to be comfortable. He didn't know this was wrong.
Anyway, Junior was sent home and the next day this counselor came in to talk to us about the incident, and we had to sit and listen to everybody in the class talk about what they saw.
It was pretty funny listening to the girls describe in exact detail something they saw that they've never seen before.
Junior showed up for a few more days after that, but he eventually disappeared. I assume he went back to homeschooling.
 
2008-05-09 02:35:23 PM
Senor Revington: I just came here to say homeschooling is bad because it doesn't allow children to develop the necessary social skills to deal with society.

And public school does this?

Sorry, but the classroom does not prepare children on how to deal with society. Last time I checked bosses were not like teachers and more than half the time work bullies don't get disciplined likes school bullies do. Also, unless you grow up to be a teacher the world is not like a classroom. Most people are thrown under the bus with little or no help. In school if you screw up you get chances until you get it right, in the real world you get fired. Shall I go on?

Not all home schoolers are socially inadequate. In fact, most home schoolers are not; furthermore, they have a tendency to be able to relate to not only peers their age, but also to those of a variety of ages; including the elderly, the infant, and all ages in between. As other people have pointed out there is very little if any evidence to support the fact that homeschooled children are less socialized then public school children.

As far as brainwashing. Sure many home schoolers brainwash their children, as do teachers, and parents of public schooled children - but not all. Many parents that home school expect children to research, think for themselves, and come to their own conclusions.

And for those who might be wondering. Yes I was homeschooled. In high school I was in a team of five students in LifeSmarts and took 3rd in the national competition.
Since then:
I successfully graduated from a university, am licensed in my field, own my own business, own my own house, and am married.
BTW I am 25. Oh and I'm not stupid enough to post my or my husband's picture on Fark to be exploited.
 
2008-05-09 02:36:06 PM
I can't figure out why the state is so interested in regulating homeschooling. Are they jealous that homeschoolers outperform their precious little snowflakes at every level in every single subject?

And I hear they get more/hotter chicks, too.
 
2008-05-09 02:37:32 PM
azkittyd: And for those who might be wondering. Yes I was homeschooled. In high school I was in a team of five students in LifeSmarts and took 3rd in the national competition.
Since then:
I successfully graduated from a university, am licensed in my field, own my own business, own my own house, and am married.
BTW I am 25. Oh and I'm not stupid enough to post my or my husband's picture on Fark to be exploited.


Thank you for saying all the words I could not find.
 
2008-05-09 02:38:20 PM
doubleofive: Thank you for saying all the words I could not find.

Maybe if you went to a real school...

;)
 
2008-05-09 02:40:05 PM
Wise_Guy: doubleofive: Thank you for saying all the words I could not find.

Maybe if you went to a real school...

;)


Niiiice.
 
2008-05-09 02:41:16 PM
FTA:
But critics of the measure say it would amount to giving a legislative seal of approval to a homeschool education when the state has no control over what is involved in that education.

I was trying to think of something that is widely accepted as "good for one's well-being" that isn't controlled by the state. My argument was going to be, "Well [x] isn't controlled by the state and it's still recognized as being legitimate."

But then... I couldn't think of anything. For some reason, I find that sad. I'm wondering if the state has successfully taken control of all that is good or if people have come to accept only those entities which are state-controlled as "good".

Or maybe I just missed something.

Regardless, I wouldn't screw around with the livelihood of adults who were homeschooled: Regardless of what one believes about them, you must admit that they are not bound by conventional thinking. If anyone was to come up with a creative, possibly disturbing, idea for getting what they want, it would be them. (Or is it "they"?)
 
2008-05-09 02:41:21 PM
Senor Revington: I just came here to say homeschooling is bad because it doesn't allow children to develop the necessary social skills to deal with society.

Are you still babbling on about that?
 
2008-05-09 02:43:43 PM
Rockwood police officer John Evans may lose his job if a bill validating his homeschooling fails to pass the Legislature soon and, he says, at least six drug arrests he has made would be dismissed.

Oh no! Drugs!
 
2008-05-09 02:43:43 PM
Dead Farker Walken: I can't figure out why the state is so interested in regulating homeschooling.

Really? You can't figure out why an organization that has certain education requirements for certain positions might wanna have some clue what your education entailed when they hire you?
 
2008-05-09 02:46:16 PM
QuitWhileYoureAhead: When I was in 5th grade there was this new kid named Junior that was home schooled all his life up until his mom got a job and had to send him to public school.
The kid was real quiet and shy, but everybody was pretty nice to him and tried to make him feel comfortable the first day he arrived.
The second day, however, was a bit different. While we were all sitting quietly taking a test or something, Junior went to the corner of the room and removed all of his clothes. It wasn't until the test was over that somebody noticed.
Everybody started laughing and the girls started screaming when he had to get up and put his clothes back on.
Apparently, from what I heard, the kid was used to being naked when being homeschooled to be comfortable. He didn't know this was wrong.
Anyway, Junior was sent home and the next day this counselor came in to talk to us about the incident, and we had to sit and listen to everybody in the class talk about what they saw.
It was pretty funny listening to the girls describe in exact detail something they saw that they've never seen before.
Junior showed up for a few more days after that, but he eventually disappeared. I assume he went back to homeschooling.


I call Shenanigans! Pics or it didn't happen. No, wait, no pics, that's just wrong. Still say bullshiat.
 
2008-05-09 02:46:52 PM
ArcadianRefugee: Dead Farker Walken: I can't figure out why the state is so interested in regulating homeschooling.

Really? You can't figure out why an organization that has certain education requirements for certain positions might wanna have some clue what your education entailed when they hire you?


It's a little ridiculous when you consider that many of these employees have been doing their jobs for YEARS. If they were not qualified, how has it not been noticed to this point?

Yes, I can in fact figure out why the state is interested. They want to be involved in everything, from Major League Baseball to Paris Hilton to homeschooling.
 
2008-05-09 02:47:12 PM
came here for home schooled guy's wife pics and was not disappointed.
 
2008-05-09 02:48:27 PM
ArcadianRefugee: Dead Farker Walken: I can't figure out why the state is so interested in regulating homeschooling.

Really? You can't figure out why an organization that has certain education requirements for certain positions might wanna have some clue what your education entailed when they hire you?


Any job that only requires a high school diploma could be served my almost any high school dropout just as well. Your argument sucks.
 
2008-05-09 02:49:48 PM
Senor Revington: I just came here to say homeschooling is bad because it doesn't allow children to develop the necessary social skills to deal with society.

1/10.
 
2008-05-09 02:50:00 PM
Tresser: e this but

I need a Babel Fish to understand that. Tell me you aren't home schooling your kids.
 
2008-05-09 02:50:07 PM
BY almost any...

stupid typos, that's 2 today already on here.
 
2008-05-09 02:51:10 PM
xanadian: Is it time to whip this one out?



"Homeschooling is about VALUES not just the three R's. The Democrats in government want our children to be brainwashed by the state with secular humanist values."

You mean THESE values (p), you farkwad?


I'm always amazed when I have to explain to bright hippie types who want to homeschool their (usually still theoretical) children that homeschooling is popular not because parents want to give their kids a deeper education, but because of religious nuts who don't want their kids to know the world is more than 6000 years old.
 
2008-05-09 02:52:35 PM
Dead Farker Walken: ArcadianRefugee: Dead Farker Walken: I can't figure out why the state is so interested in regulating homeschooling.

Really? You can't figure out why an organization that has certain education requirements for certain positions might wanna have some clue what your education entailed when they hire you?

It's a little ridiculous when you consider that many of these employees have been doing their jobs for YEARS. If they were not qualified, how has it not been noticed to this point?

Yes, I can in fact figure out why the state is interested. They want to be involved in everything, from Major League Baseball to Paris Hilton to homeschooling.


Not being qualified may well have been noticed, but political sponsors or quotas or church affiliation may have been noted MORE.

For FSM's sake, is it too much to expect students to take the Gateway Test or the GED to graduate? Maybe even the FCAT.
 
2008-05-09 02:53:23 PM
forstmeister: I call Shenanigans! Pics or it didn't happen. No, wait, no pics, that's just wrong. Still say bullshiat.

Nope, it really happened. Of course, I don't remember most of the details. This was more than 20 years ago, and I was kid.
 
2008-05-09 02:53:29 PM
Because public schooling is working out so well. Morans.
 
2008-05-09 02:55:20 PM
QuitWhileYoureAhead: forstmeister: I call Shenanigans! Pics or it didn't happen. No, wait, no pics, that's just wrong. Still say bullshiat.

Nope, it really happened. Of course, I don't remember most of the details. This was more than 20 years ago, and I was a kid that boy.


FTFY
 
2008-05-09 02:55:52 PM
xanadian - funny you invoke the US constitution, which prohibits, in plain language, the federal government's involvement in education.

Those that work for government schools are the same as the Mafia. It's extortion, pure and simple.

/won't somebody think of the children
 
2008-05-09 02:56:39 PM
I did public school and 1 year of home school, my dad yanked me out and home schooled me in the 8th grade. His goal was to show the school he could do a better job, since I was getting D's and F's.

The funny thing is, this was about 1984-85 and I had discovered this awesome thing called.. D&D! :) - Never did homework, came home and drew up character sheets for the weekend games.

After the year of home schooling I lost interest in D&D and did better in school and my dad is gloating to this day that one year of homeschooling saved me.

I never had the heart to ruin his moment.
 
2008-05-09 03:01:21 PM
I grew up in rural Tennessee and, even as the spouse of an public school teacher in Alabama (which has community schools and much higher test scores), I empathize with the homeschoolers. Frankly, the county public school systems of Tennessee absolutely SUCK!!!!

I spent about 30% of my school day riding the damn bus to and from the school, which was anywhere from 20 to 40 miles one-way. The schools, especially high schools, were centralized during "integration" in order to pool athletic talent to one location. That means those of us who would have had a sense of community in the previous school systems were treated as outsiders by the ignorant hicks living near and working in the schools that weren't shut down.

I'm the first person to say that a good education starts at home, that the pupil is ultimately responsible for his own educational welfare, and that schoolteachers can't make a belligerent fool learn. But half of the kids who attended my 8th grade class dropped out by their senior year. The outcome screams that there's a problem with the system, and not necessarily with pupils' homelives.

I did the best I could and managed to get a full scholarship to a highly selective university, despite my hatred for the public school system in my county. My brothers remained in Tennessee and are homeschooling their kids. Just as I do, they despise public school in Tennessee, and they have my unmitigated empathy.
 
2008-05-09 03:03:23 PM
forstmeister: Any job that only requires a high school diploma could be served my almost any high school dropout just as well. Your argument sucks.

It would, if you were right. I disagree with you, as my experience has shown otherwise. YRMV.

The simple fact of the matter is the state DOES have requirements, and with homeschooling, a lack of oversight means it is impossible to determine if these requirements have been met.
 
2008-05-09 03:06:38 PM
Yossarian22: Sarcastica75: THIS is what I came to see.


good to know.
Wanna be famous? Post your wife on FARK today and tell us all how you personally were homeschooled and 'turned out normal'...then to illustrate the point make sure to include pictures of your wife to help show just how NORMAL you are. We, the FARK community, will take it from there.


i would be home schooled if it meant getting to defile her.
 
2008-05-09 03:07:27 PM
My First Grade Teacher: You're here to learn, not socialize!

We are a homeschooling family. No hate or ID taught here. School for one goes quickly and leaves tons of time to socialize.
 
2008-05-09 03:08:24 PM
Yossarian22: Wanna be famous? Post your wife on FARK today and tell us all how you personally were homeschooled and 'turned out normal'...then to illustrate the point make sure to include pictures of your wife to help show just how NORMAL you are. We, the FARK community, will take it from there.

I must have missed that day. Anybody have a link to that thread? Or want to tell me what happened?

/pretty please?
//sugar on top?
 
2008-05-09 03:09:01 PM
Yamaneko2: Dead Farker Walken: ArcadianRefugee: Dead Farker Walken: I can't figure out why the state is so interested in regulating homeschooling.

Really? You can't figure out why an organization that has certain education requirements for certain positions might wanna have some clue what your education entailed when they hire you?

It's a little ridiculous when you consider that many of these employees have been doing their jobs for YEARS. If they were not qualified, how has it not been noticed to this point?

Yes, I can in fact figure out why the state is interested. They want to be involved in everything, from Major League Baseball to Paris Hilton to homeschooling.

Not being qualified may well have been noticed, but political sponsors or quotas or church affiliation may have been noted MORE.

For FSM's sake, is it too much to expect students to take the Gateway Test or the GED to graduate? Maybe even the FCAT.


I was homeschooled, and I had to take the ACT to enter college. It wasn't that big of a deal. Now that I have a college degree, I doubt anyone would question my high school diploma, but I'd certainly be pissed off if they did.
 
2008-05-09 03:10:03 PM
This is a good example of why the US Constitution forbids ex post facto laws.

It is just not fair to change the rules in the middle of the game.

I find it interesting that the Government claims that this is just a "reinterpretation" of existing law.

This "reinterpretation" has such profound effects that it is essentially a change in the law. The courts would (hopefully) rule this as ex post facto.

We would then have the reasonable outcome of leaving people already with homeschooling certificates alone, while establishing new standards for anyone getting one in the future.
 
2008-05-09 03:10:40 PM
Batewoman: Yossarian22: Wanna be famous? Post your wife on FARK today and tell us all how you personally were homeschooled and 'turned out normal'...then to illustrate the point make sure to include pictures of your wife to help show just how NORMAL you are. We, the FARK community, will take it from there.

I must have missed that day. Anybody have a link to that thread? Or want to tell me what happened?

/pretty please?
//sugar on top?


There was a homeschooling thread, and of course there were trolls about how homeschoolers are socially-inept retards. Some guy took offense and posted pictures of his hot but bleach-toothed wife to prove how successful he is.

It's become a cliche.
 
2008-05-09 03:11:07 PM
blacknewport65: I grew up in rural Tennessee and, even as the spouse of an public school teacher in Alabama (which has community schools and much higher test scores),

My mother grew up in Alabama and went to one of these schools. I hear great things about them. She was so miffed at the books I was being made to read in school (Bunnicula in 6th grade) she decided I had a whole other set of assignments at home (Dickens, Austen, Bronte) to resemble the ones she was reading at that age for school. I will never stop thanking her for that.

Anyway, know how I can find out if have any such schools in my area? What to google for?
 
2008-05-09 03:12:31 PM
Senor Revington:
I just came here to say homeschooling is bad because it doesn't allow children to develop the necessary social skills to deal with society.

I personally have seen very few social skills that can be learned in public school which translate into the adult world. Just go to a retail store staffed by high-schoolers and see for yourself (assuming you are out of high school).

Not to give the impression of a hard and fast rule, but most (in my experience) high-schoolers clash awkwardly with adults -- even when they're really trying not to.

But homeschoolers (again, in my experience) are ready to talk intelligently with adults by age 10 or 11. And by "intelligently" I mostly mean that their talk is missing the condescension, arrogance, and age-specific frivolity (fashion, buzzwords, etc.) that most adults don't care about.

So what "necessary social skills" do homeschoolers miss? As far as I can tell, it is the social skills which are used strictly for getting around in a society of children. And why would anyone want to learn that? They'd just have to unlearn it once they grew up.

But if your idea of "necessary social skills" includes, "Hot farkettes give me a ring: xxx-xxx-xxxx", then I suspect this old guy's experiences won't count for much.

Here's an interesting (perhaps) look at the social skills that homeschoolers miss out on. (pops)
 
2008-05-09 03:13:46 PM
Yamaneko2: Dead Farker Walken: ArcadianRefugee: Dead Farker Walken: I can't figure out why the state is so interested in regulating homeschooling.

Really? You can't figure out why an organization that has certain education requirements for certain positions might wanna have some clue what your education entailed when they hire you?

It's a little ridiculous when you consider that many of these employees have been doing their jobs for YEARS. If they were not qualified, how has it not been noticed to this point?

Yes, I can in fact figure out why the state is interested. They want to be involved in everything, from Major League Baseball to Paris Hilton to homeschooling.

Not being qualified may well have been noticed, but political sponsors or quotas or church affiliation may have been noted MORE.

For FSM's sake, is it too much to expect students to take the Gateway Test or the GED to graduate? Maybe even the FCAT.


Political sponsors, quotas, and church affiliation? You're not reaching at all there for totally unsubstantiated arguments, are you?

What if someone came up to you, assuming you went to public school, and told you you had to take the SAT again?
 
2008-05-09 03:14:14 PM
Common sense dictates that people who got their diploma before any change in requirements should be grandfathered.
 
2008-05-09 03:18:29 PM
Some Bass Playing Guy: Common sense dictates that people who got their diploma before any change in requirements should be grandfathered.

We're talking about the TN state government, though.
 
2008-05-09 03:18:58 PM
Homeschooler getting kick out of these replies etc.

I'm often told, "You don't act like you were home schooled" To which I like to reply "You don't act like were public schooled". The looks I get are priceless.

But really the socialization and academics vary greatly from family to family. All depends on why they are homeschooling and how they do it. My parents were both teachers and my dad is still is. Most of the Curriculum that are popular are much harder than whats used in the public school system, and there are video classes that you can use for harder subjects.
 
2008-05-09 03:19:37 PM
There will always be anecdotal horror stories about home schooled kids.

All the home schooled kids I know are success stories.

But anecdotes aside, you need real evidence that home schooled kids as a whole are worse off than public schooled kids.

Such evidence does not exist. If it did, the government would have already used it to outlaw homeschooling.
 
2008-05-09 03:19:55 PM
Darthmalt: I'm often told, "You don't act like you were home schooled" To which I like to reply "You don't act like were public schooled". The looks I get are priceless.

I need to use that.
 
2008-05-09 03:21:00 PM
doubleofive: Darthmalt: I'm often told, "You don't act like you were home schooled" To which I like to reply "You don't act like were public schooled". The looks I get are priceless.

I need to use that.


agreed
 
2008-05-09 03:29:15 PM
Darthmalt: Homeschooler getting kick out of these replies etc.

I'm often told, "You don't act like you were home schooled" To which I like to reply "You don't act like were public schooled". The looks I get are priceless.

But really the socialization and academics vary greatly from family to family. All depends on why they are homeschooling and how they do it. My parents were both teachers and my dad is still is. Most of the Curriculum that are popular are much harder than whats used in the public school system, and there are video classes that you can use for harder subjects.


If we are so lacking in social skills that we cannot function in society as we should, certainly people would notice and be able to distinguish those characteristics. Yet nobody in my entire life has come up to me and said, "Hey, you were homeschooled, weren't you?"

Not once.
 
2008-05-09 03:32:52 PM
Burn98: But anecdotes aside, you need real evidence that home schooled kids as a whole are worse off than public schooled kids.

Such evidence does not exist. If it did, the government would have already used it to outlaw homeschooling.



You hit the nail on the head. My experience was that I was more prepared for college than my public schooled peers. I had no problem doing projects on my own and getting them done on time. With good parents there is no excuse for not doing work on time. They know whether you were sick or just goofing off, and in college most of the teachers don't care.


Couple quick facts I found


In Pennsylvania, 171 homeschooled students took the CTBS standardized achievement test. The tests were all administered in group settings by Pennsylvania certified teachers. The middle reading score was the 89th percentile and the middle math score was the 72nd percentile. The middle science score was the 87th percentile and the middle social studies score was the 81st percentile.


According to the 1998 ACT High School Profile Report, 2,610 graduating homeschoolers took the ACT and scored an average of 22.8 out of a possible 36 points. This score is slightly higher that the 1997 report released on the results of 1,926 homeschool graduates and founding homeschoolers maintained the average of 22.5. This is higher than the national average, which was 21.0 in both 1997 and 1998


In 1997, Dr. Irene Prue, Assistant Director of Admission of Georgia Southern University, released a nationwide survey of admissions personnel's knowledge, attitudes and experiences with home educated applicants. In general, a total of 210 (out of the 1,289 surveyed) respondents to the study reported:

* Homeschoolers are academically, emotionally, and socially prepared to succeed at college.

* Parental motivations and involvement are in the best interest of their children.

* While documentation and evaluation of homeschooled applicants is problematic, it is not insurmountable.

2219 students reporting their homeschool status on the SAT in 1999 scored an average of 1083 (verbal 548, math 535), 67 points above the national average of 1016. In 2004 the 7858 homeschool students taking the ACT scored an average of 22.6, compared to the national average of 20.9.


According to the 1998 ACT High School Profile Report, 2610 graduating homeschoolers took the ACT and scored an average of 22.8 out of a possible 36 points. This score is slightly higher that the 1997 report released on the results of 1926 homeschool graduates and founding homeschoolers maintained the average of 22.5. This is higher than the national average, which was 21.0 in both 1997 and 1998.

The 1996 ACT results showed that in English, homeschoolers scored 22.5 compared to the national average of 20.3. In math, homeschoolers scored 19.2 compared to the national average of 20.2. In reading, homeschoolers outshone their public school counterparts 24.1 to 21.3. In science, homeschoolers scored 21.9 compared to 21.1.


Iowa State University's admissions department data shows that homeschoolers had a 26.1 mean ACT composite score as compared to a 24.6 mean score for all entering freshmen beginning fall 2003. The University of Iowa and the University of Northern Iowa (UNI) have also seen higher ACT and SAT averages from homeschoolers in comparison to the total school population. The cumulative admissions data from UNI reveals that the average ACT score for homeschoolers was 2 points higher than that of regular freshmen: 25 versus 23

/left out really old statistics
//and ones by places like National Home Educators Association
 
2008-05-09 03:33:51 PM
I came for this and was not disappointed:

i252.photobucket.com
 
2008-05-09 03:39:47 PM
Darthmalt

I'm curious as to why the math scores are in some cases lower.
 
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