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(Slashdot)   Your new highway menace: Radioactive cats   (yro.slashdot.org) divider line 130
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15361 clicks; posted to Main » on 24 Mar 2008 at 9:21 AM (6 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2008-03-24 08:09:45 AM
So what happens when someone gets pulled over for having been given radiation for cancer? Is that considered a valid reason to pull someone over?
 
2008-03-24 08:27:29 AM
Radioactive Cats with special spidey powers...

/Spider cat, spider cat, does whatever a spider cat does.
 
2008-03-24 08:28:23 AM
Pretty sure this is total BS. If you are treated with radiation you are not radioactive. There are some radioisotope treatments, but you would never pick that up from that kind of distance at a level above background - unless someone was doing something very strange to that cat!
 
2008-03-24 08:29:40 AM
Kitty is reaching critical mass?
 
2008-03-24 08:32:14 AM
That pussy's hot.
 
2008-03-24 08:34:15 AM
Damn it, now I want a radioactive cat.
 
2008-03-24 08:39:02 AM
This is what you get if you're dumb enough to give a cat chemo/radiation therapy for cancer.

A little lead poisoning does the same job. And it's way cheaper.
 
2008-03-24 08:40:31 AM
perdu: unless someone was doing something very strange to that cat!

This - somebody needs to take a look at the machine at the vet's office, ASAP.
 
2008-03-24 08:43:18 AM
staplermofo: Damn it, now I want a radioactive cat.

www.cartoonstock.com
 
2008-03-24 08:49:18 AM
staplermofo: Damn it, now I want a radioactive cat.

Would you settle for a glow in the dark cat?
 
2008-03-24 08:51:05 AM
FitzShivering: Would you settle for a glow in the dark cat?

Only if it comes with sciencey device that says it's radioactive.
 
2008-03-24 08:53:18 AM
icanhascheezburger.files.wordpress.com
 
2008-03-24 09:23:52 AM
forked_at_fark

members.aol.com
 
2008-03-24 09:26:42 AM
i192.photobucket.com
 
2008-03-24 09:27:26 AM
Oh boy, here come the SI-cats.
 
2008-03-24 09:27:27 AM
this thread needs more radioactive lolcats
 
2008-03-24 09:28:17 AM
The Koreans are at it again, aren't they.

www.foxnews.com

There are some events that just make you realize how bizarre things have gotten- realizing that you just GISed "cat + glowing +Korea" and got results is one of them.
 
2008-03-24 09:29:13 AM
That is so awesome.
 
2008-03-24 09:33:10 AM
I haven't seen a slashdot tag in over a year.
 
2008-03-24 09:34:22 AM
It's not Caturday- Why? for the love of god. Why?
 
2008-03-24 09:36:13 AM
Goofball_Jones

First thing I thought of
 
2008-03-24 09:37:03 AM
Strangest damn results from a GIS for "Nuclear Cat"

E.G.:
betsydevine.com
 
2008-03-24 09:37:13 AM
you didn't know?

all cats are nuclear powered....

dogs are internal combustion...which explains the bad smells that come from them sometimes

/dog farts can peel paint off a wall
 
2008-03-24 09:38:54 AM
www.flatrock.org.nz
 
2008-03-24 09:39:04 AM
I'm not surprised at the attitude some have, but honestly, this is rather awesome... they were able to detect a radioactive isotope (probably something the cat was injected with to target a specific cancer) from a median in a passing vehicle.

What's more interesting is what they've probably found and stopped.... and not told us about.

Border security around the world has had radiation detectors in place for decades. I recall a story about Soviet-era border guards detaining a Finnish fisherman who was radioactive for some reason or another.

Say what you want about your "oppressive government" - this sort of thing has gone on and will continue under every administration that comes along. Like it or not, there will always be some twat who will try and smuggle something destructive into our country, and these guys are our first line of defense, and if "nabbing" a radioactive cat (more like pulling it over and having a laugh with the owner) once and a while prevents that twat from bowing up a dirty bomb in NYC, or a nuke in Vegas, so be it.
 
2008-03-24 09:41:39 AM
I can haz dirty bomb?
 
2008-03-24 09:43:14 AM
j.....z I can haz dirty bomb?

No! Not Yours!
 
2008-03-24 09:44:30 AM
i177.photobucket.com
 
2008-03-24 09:44:48 AM
www.mycathatesyou.com

The truth. Let me shows it to you.
 
2008-03-24 09:44:52 AM
It's possible that the cat had been in for radioiodine treatment for hyperthyroidism. That does make the animal retain radioactivity, though usually they have to be kenneled until it passes out of their system.

The vets offered me this option for my hyperthyroid cat BTW... I was absolutely incredulous at the cost involved. So kitty got pills instead, and I didn't have to risk ending up at Gitmo.
 
2008-03-24 09:45:10 AM
The terrorists are getting sneakier
 
2008-03-24 09:47:29 AM
Is this guy gonna end up at Kitmo?
 
2008-03-24 09:47:46 AM
We need the "Kitty has reached critical mass" pic.
 
2008-03-24 09:49:36 AM
i236.photobucket.com
 
2008-03-24 09:55:09 AM
I thought that this comment on the site highlighted some great points:


The false positive rate does matter, regardless of whether or not rights are being trampled. When you conduct any sort of large scale surveillance activity, the base rate fallacy [wikipedia.org] implies that most of the triggering events will be false positives. With too many false positives, your surveillance program is worse than useless -- it wastes money that could otherwise be better used on other security initiatives.

I know there is some emotional appeal in arguing that "if it saves even one life, etc. etc. then it's worth any amount of money" but in the real world that's just not true. In the real world, spending one billion dollars to save a life might be a bad idea if spending that same money on some other program would save two lives. In comparing the relative merits of two or more different security proposals, the false positive rate is one important factor to consider, because it affects the cost/benefit analysis.

Of course, people's rights matter as well, because that also affects the cost/benefit analysis. Unfortunately, the American public is seemingly too dumb to perform any sort of analysis involving more than one variable. Since the false positive rate involves math, it doesn't have any political appeal at all. Hence the Republicans fixate only on the terrorists, and the Democrats when not fixating on the terrorists focus only on civil liberties to the exclusion of all else. - David Jao
 
2008-03-24 09:56:57 AM
Hack Patooey: Is this guy gonna end up at Kitmo?
WIN.
 
2008-03-24 09:58:09 AM
www.guidebookgallery.org
 
2008-03-24 09:59:43 AM
img507.imageshack.us
img507.imageshack.us
 
2008-03-24 09:59:52 AM
Too late for Caturday?

i86.photobucket.com
 
2008-03-24 10:03:04 AM
Too lazy to look this up, but a few years ago, some reporter (or maybe it was a tourist) went to the White House after get dosed. He set off a radiation alarm.

How about that? I'm not too lazy. Thanks again for setting the bar low mister High School Counsellor

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/5243198.stm

And it was back prior to 9/11
 
2008-03-24 10:04:52 AM
All your radioactive base are belong to us.
 
2008-03-24 10:05:16 AM
Wow, better make sure it didn't have two heads or the aquabats will be right. QUICK, HIDE YOUR HOT DOGS, THIS CATS UPSET

/obscure?
 
2008-03-24 10:06:21 AM
i255.photobucket.com
 
2008-03-24 10:07:02 AM
nokahnwudman: We need the "Kitty has reached critical mass" pic.

Wasn't good enough for you the first time?
 
2008-03-24 10:10:45 AM
copperheadclgp: I thought that this comment on the site highlighted some great points:


The false positive rate does matter, regardless of whether or not rights are being trampled. When you conduct any sort of large scale surveillance activity, the base rate fallacy [wikipedia.org] implies that most of the triggering events will be false positives. With too many false positives, your surveillance program is worse than useless -- it wastes money that could otherwise be better used on other security initiatives.

I know there is some emotional appeal in arguing that "if it saves even one life, etc. etc. then it's worth any amount of money" but in the real world that's just not true. In the real world, spending one billion dollars to save a life might be a bad idea if spending that same money on some other program would save two lives. In comparing the relative merits of two or more different security proposals, the false positive rate is one important factor to consider, because it affects the cost/benefit analysis.

Of course, people's rights matter as well, because that also affects the cost/benefit analysis. Unfortunately, the American public is seemingly too dumb to perform any sort of analysis involving more than one variable. Since the false positive rate involves math, it doesn't have any political appeal at all. Hence the Republicans fixate only on the terrorists, and the Democrats when not fixating on the terrorists focus only on civil liberties to the exclusion of all else. - David Jao


I doubt they are seeing too many "false positives" for this surveillance. We are talking about detecting radioactive materials, and even identifying the isotopes involved. We've removed 99.99% of the radioactive materials from our lives, with the exception of smoke detectors (which aren't something you usually transport across the border, unless you are a trucker).

This isn't really "fixating" on anything except the transport of potentially dangerous materials, and is very specific. It's not different than x-raying your carry on bags for guns.

Want to talk about trampling civil liberties? How about "random" bag searches? The TSA has specific tests to detect potentially dangerous residues, yet still open plenty of bags and search them. To be honest, I'm getting sick of finding that TSA tag and find my belongings have been rifled through. At least that's the extent of it, and it hasn't caused anything to be lost or miss a flight.... but still, it's one abuse of the current policy we probably don't need.

Further more, that commenter would probably be against profiling (not "racial profiling" - just plain "profiling"), though it offers the best means to isolate potential threats and whittle down the "false positives" he talks about.
 
2008-03-24 10:13:58 AM
I was waiting for the glowing eyes stargate refference.
 
2008-03-24 10:14:29 AM
I didn't read the article, but a friend of mine was that dosed recently for thyroid problems was given a note in case she was pulled over. She was also told that trying to get on a plane or subway for the next few weeks would be a harrowing experience at best. The people who gave her the pill wouldn't handle it directly, with full body suits and some sort of handling tongs dropping off the tablet behind a leaded glass window. That's gotta make you feel comfortable that the techs giving you the medicine won't go near something you're about to swallow.
 
2008-03-24 10:14:56 AM
Speaking of profiling, was it a Persian cat by any chance?
 
2008-03-24 10:16:39 AM
i154.photobucket.com

"Radiation, yes indeed! You hear the most outrageous lies about it. Half-baked, goggle-boxed do-gooders telling everybody it's bad for you. Pernicious nonsense! Everybody could stand a hundred chest x-rays a year."
 
2008-03-24 10:20:29 AM
catts are too cool to be radio active
 
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