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(KEYEtv.com - CBS Austin)   Cloth diapers are making a comeback. It's a green movement   (keyetv.com ) divider line
    More: Spiffy  
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6432 clicks; posted to Main » on 29 Feb 2008 at 9:48 AM (8 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



322 Comments     (+0 »)
 
 
2008-02-29 07:57:18 AM  
I've seen (and disposed of) too many green movements recently to even consider cloth diapers. +1

/but still img1.fark.net
 
2008-02-29 08:02:12 AM  
Nothing like the thought of a washing machine full of fecal matter to start off the day.
 
2008-02-29 08:02:43 AM  
I had to use cloth diapers for my son when he was a baby so I'm getting a kick out of these replies.

/He's in college now.
 
2008-02-29 08:03:36 AM  
GoDeep: Nothing like the thought of a washing machine full of fecal matter to start off the day.

You get a diaper service.


/No you may NOT have a washing machine full of shiat.
//Not Yours.
 
2008-02-29 08:04:39 AM  
The Onanist: You get a diaper service.

RTFA.
 
2008-02-29 08:09:59 AM  
Yeah. Pea green.
 
2008-02-29 08:20:48 AM  
I'm thinking more of a shade like avocado.

img504.imageshack.us

Worst. Fruit. Ever.
 
2008-02-29 08:29:04 AM  
Ahh the good ole hippy colony, I miss it - despite the 'keep austin weird' folk.
 
2008-02-29 08:35:53 AM  
Um, yah. Cloth diapers were "making a comeback" when my twins were born 17 years ago. That lasted all of a week.
 
2008-02-29 08:36:34 AM  
WolfinPHX: Worst. Fruit. Ever.

Blasphemy! If you've never had good guacamole, I weep for you.

That said, if my wife wanted to use cloth diapers, that'd be fine with me... I'd never have to change the baby.
 
2008-02-29 08:40:02 AM  
We do it. It isn't hard. The diapers are very different now. We wash ourselves, too.
www.mother-ease.com
 
2008-02-29 08:50:39 AM  
Know whats better than saving the environment? Not cleaning shiat.
 
2008-02-29 08:51:08 AM  
Two Dogs Farking: I've seen (and disposed of) too many green movements recently to even consider cloth diapers. +1

My thoughts exactly.
 
2008-02-29 08:51:49 AM  
We used cloth on both my boys. We had a service. It was really no different than disposable, AFAIAC. Well, forgetting to put the bag out on the step on the right day was a drag....
 
2008-02-29 09:05:38 AM  
The disposable diapers I've seen are labeled good for 10-20lbs, how long does it take a kid to shiat that much?
 
2008-02-29 09:06:33 AM  
submitter: It's a green movement

Not if the kids been eating crayons, it's not.
 
2008-02-29 09:10:26 AM  
Greenlit POOP THREAD!!!

/Greenlit green -- er, nevermind
 
2008-02-29 09:19:56 AM  
EvilEgg: The disposable diapers I've seen are labeled good for 10-20lbs, how long does it take a kid to shiat that much?

About fifteen minutes for the typical infant.
 
2008-02-29 09:23:57 AM  
Heh. Out of curiosity, I ran a search for "diaper services" on yellowpages.com for my area and came up with zero matches, but the top "related search" was "abortion services." The concepts seem mutually exclusive to me.
 
2008-02-29 09:29:21 AM  
www.kiddieskitchen.co.uk
tbn0.google.com ` Strong stuff.
 
2008-02-29 09:50:33 AM  
abbamouse: Greenlit POOP THREAD!!!

/Greenlit green -- er, nevermind


FTFY.

/eurgh.
 
2008-02-29 09:50:38 AM  
Nabb1: Heh. Out of curiosity, I ran a search for "diaper services" on yellowpages.com for my area and came up with zero matches, but the top "related search" was "abortion services." The concepts seem mutually exclusive to me.

Mayhaps someone is having fun at your expense


/Yes I know it's not a word
 
2008-02-29 09:50:58 AM  
+1 subby nice headline.
 
2008-02-29 09:51:14 AM  
Top-notch headline, cheerio!
 
2008-02-29 09:51:28 AM  
30 years ago my hippie parents had me raised using only cloth diapers. I have a fear of diaper pins and being poked in the hip to this day.
 
2008-02-29 09:51:56 AM  
Have babies?

Baby poop.

You can stop me right there.
 
2008-02-29 09:52:27 AM  
GoDeep: Nothing like the thought of a washing machine full of fecal matter to start off the day.

I wash my husband's clothing from the hospital which I imagine has fecal material, blood and MRSA. A little crap does not bother me. And remember Clorox cures all.

That being said, screw "Mother Earth," if I have a kid I'm going disposable all the way.
 
2008-02-29 09:52:54 AM  
FunkOut: 30 years ago my hippie parents had me raised using only cloth diapers. I have a fear of diaper pins and being poked in the hip to this day.

Is there a club for that? You know, one of them 'downtown' ones with no signs?
 
2008-02-29 09:53:00 AM  
We tried cloth diapers for about 1 week. Seems like a good idea, but not really any cheaper than disposables, and washing them multiple times to clean them probably takes up as many resources as making/disposing the 1x use ones. Once your kid starts eating solid foods and starts dropping logs, cloth diapers become completely unreasonable.
 
2008-02-29 09:54:23 AM  
Poopy
 
2008-02-29 09:54:24 AM  
Nothing like sloppy journalism to start the day. Can't people just pay a copyeditor? Seriously.
 
2008-02-29 09:54:28 AM  
WolfinPHX:
Worst. Fruit. Ever.


What does Richard Simmons have to do with a thread about cloth diapers?

...[thinks a bit]...

Nevermind, I withdraw the question.
 
2008-02-29 09:54:45 AM  
Bowel Movement?
 
2008-02-29 09:54:48 AM  
mmm Baby shiat to go with my coffee.
 
2008-02-29 09:55:08 AM  
The Onanist: I had to use cloth diapers for my son when he was a baby so I'm getting a kick out of these replies.

/He's in college now.



Cloth diapers makes you more intelligent?
 
2008-02-29 09:55:31 AM  
Are you telling me a cork is insufficient?
 
2008-02-29 09:55:38 AM  
Just turn south asian.

then you can wipe their ass with your hand. you are already used to putting shiat on your hand, so wiping it out of the diaper is no big deal.
 
2008-02-29 09:56:10 AM  
hillbillypharmacist: We do it. It isn't hard. The diapers are very different now. We wash ourselves, too.

Same here. We even line-dry them. Freakin' hippies.

The only real drawback is that they make my son's butt so big that it's hard to fit him in any of his pj suits he wears around the house.
 
2008-02-29 09:56:26 AM  
As a new father of a 4-month old, let me just say that the people behind the new cloth diaper movement can go f*ck themselves. It's hard enough with disposable diapers, I'm not going to clean and reuse cloth ones.

/Pampers Swaddlers FTW
 
2008-02-29 09:56:42 AM  
HAHAHAHAHAH

GROSS
 
2008-02-29 09:57:31 AM  
hillbillypharmacist: We wash ourselves, too.

That's better than some farkers.
 
2008-02-29 09:58:13 AM  
Supposedly, you are supposed to clean the crap out of disposables before doing the disposal part. From the ones I've seen in parking lots and on the side of the highway, they don't do that. Removing the crap reduces the amount in the landfill and that is how the exstimate the amount diapers occupy in landfills.

No kids.
 
2008-02-29 09:58:17 AM  
Nice headline, Subby!
 
2008-02-29 09:58:27 AM  
Excellent headline.
 
2008-02-29 09:58:28 AM  
<b>lilplatinum:</b> <i>Know whats better than saving the environment? Not cleaning shiat.</i>

win.
 
2008-02-29 09:59:05 AM  
Just let em be free and follow the kid around with a pooper scooper.
 
2008-02-29 09:59:45 AM  
hillbillypharmacist: We wash ourselves, too.

And how often do you bathe? Once a week?
 
2008-02-29 09:59:58 AM  
FTFA: What also works for her is the gas she saves from not having to make frequent trips to the store for diapers.

What a horrible argument. a) Buy more at once, and when you're doing other shopping, so you don't have to keep going out for diapers. b) you think those extra loads in the wash are free?
 
2008-02-29 10:00:14 AM  
We used a diaper service for our kids. It worked well and it ended up being slightly cheaper than disposables. To was pretty easy too -- all we had to do is empty the solids into the toilet and place the soiled diaper into the service's container.
 
2008-02-29 10:01:22 AM  
Green movement? I'm just worried about the Brown movement.
 
2008-02-29 10:01:56 AM  
Diaper Services aren't as easy to come by as we thought. Some friends of ours wanted to sign us up for a Diaper Service as a gift -- but they couldn't find any. And we live in Dallas! (Not exactly a small town).

We did cloth for a while, but you can't really leave the house with those any more -- not by today's standards anyway.

It never ceases to amaze me how thousand-year-old practices can go from "acceptable" to "unacceptable" within a matter of 10-20 years. And most -- if not all -- of them mean more expenses just to "get by".

What an age we live in.
 
2008-02-29 10:03:17 AM  
Cloth is worse environmentally than disposable (new window)

More industrial waste, more energy used. Yes disposable take up more space in a landfill, but they also produce more methane, and therefore are a green bonus, in providing some of the energy they consume in the manufacture.
 
2008-02-29 10:05:32 AM  
buenohead: Diaper Services aren't as easy to come by as we thought. Some friends of ours wanted to sign us up for a Diaper Service as a gift -- but they couldn't find any. And we live in Dallas! (Not exactly a small town).

We found ours listed under linen services, such as the folks who clean the linens for restaurants.
 
2008-02-29 10:05:57 AM  
Seemed like a good idea when my daughter was born. My "green movement" lasted for about a week. fark washing shiatty diapers.
 
2008-02-29 10:06:39 AM  
We use cloth diapers and wash our own.

The sprayer I built and added to the toilet line = no fecal matter in the washing machine. At least no more than normal. I know you can buy them premade, but it's so much cheaper to build one yourself.
 
2008-02-29 10:06:44 AM  
1-gallon bottle of grape drink (not juice) = green movement

Try it at home, it's fun!
 
2008-02-29 10:08:15 AM  
OderusUrungus: We tried cloth diapers for about 1 week. Seems like a good idea, but not really any cheaper than disposables, and washing them multiple times to clean them probably takes up as many resources as making/disposing the 1x use ones. Once your kid starts eating solid foods and starts dropping logs, cloth diapers become completely unreasonable.

IIRC...when a college did a study of the overall impact on the benefits...they found that the resources to wash them took was as detrimental to the environment. The clorine, water use, electricity. Or gas used by companies to drop and pic up.

It was just as damaging to the enviro as disposable.

It just made some yuppies feel like they were doing something hip.
 
2008-02-29 10:08:27 AM  
Devilbunee: We use cloth diapers and wash our own.



If you're posting on Fark, aren't you a little old for diapers?
 
2008-02-29 10:09:25 AM  
To my half-assed opinion the idea itself is full of fail - while they can be worn more than once they dont last forever, the kid does grow and need ever increasing sizes. By the time you factor in the energy to heat the water, the overhead in the production/use/disposal and environmental impact of the detergents, drying, delivery (if people use a service), the basic input to grow the cotton/make the diaper etc etc.... hell you cant possibly come out THAT far ahead.

You could probably make a much larger impact on the environment turning the heat on your house down a degree or two, buying a more fuel efficient car and clustering your driving habits to eliminate uneeded trips.

OH and the fact that disposables are like 5000 times more convienent - which is all that really matters :)
 
2008-02-29 10:09:30 AM  
kevlar51: FTFA: What also works for her is the gas she saves from not having to make frequent trips to the store for diapers.

What a horrible argument. a) Buy more at once, and when you're doing other shopping, so you don't have to keep going out for diapers. b) you think those extra loads in the wash are free?


b) is a good point. What about all the water being used to do all that extra laundry and where does the soapy water go, that has to harm the enviroment to some extent.
 
2008-02-29 10:09:54 AM  
My fiancee's sister actually works for a company that makes cloth diapers(among lots of other baby things). They apparently offer diaper cleaning service, as well.

/Might be getting a kick
 
2008-02-29 10:10:28 AM  
cubsfan07: If you're posting on Fark, aren't you a little old for diapers?

No one is too old for a FETISH, dumbass.
 
2008-02-29 10:11:01 AM  
+#2 subby.
 
2008-02-29 10:11:05 AM  
Devilbunee: The sprayer I built and added to the toilet line = no fecal matter in the washing machine. At least no more than normal. I know you can buy them premade, but it's so much cheaper to build one yourself.


Laundry sinks perform a similar function.

What about a brown movenment?
 
2008-02-29 10:11:05 AM  
if I have a kid I'm going disposable all the way.

I agree. Disposable kids are definitely the way to go!
 
2008-02-29 10:11:42 AM  
My parents used cloth diapers on me.
Apparently someone managed to pin the diaper TO me when I was a baby. They couldn't figure out why I was crying for a few minutes.
 
2008-02-29 10:12:10 AM  
This is news? I've been cloth diapering for three years.

For those of you who are somehow avoiding "cleaning shiat" by using sposies, what do you use, a baby bidet? The grossest part is and always will be wiping the actual baby butt. Throwing the diaper into a pail after you do that, does it matter if it's a garbage pail or a diaper pail with a washable liner? Is it somehow worse to gather up the full bag of dirty cloth diapers and toss the whole mess into the washing machine than to take out the trash? Seriously, this isn't your grandma's cloth diaper. You don't dunk them in the toilet, you don't beat them on a rock down at the river. There are no pins to stab your kid in the hip. It's no worse than washing your underwear in the washing machine.

I care about the environment as much as the next Farker, but that's not my primary motivation. They're cheaper, they're cuter, and sposies are full of freaky chemicals.
 
2008-02-29 10:12:25 AM  
dittybopper: WolfinPHX:
Worst. Fruit. Ever.

What does Richard Simmons have to do with a thread about cloth diapers?

...[thinks a bit]...

Nevermind, I withdraw the question.


Damn both of you! Avacados and Richard Simmons are only my 2 FAVORITE things!
 
2008-02-29 10:12:40 AM  
The Onanist: I had to use cloth diapers for my son when he was a baby so I'm getting a kick out of these replies.

/He's in college now.


Was he home schooled?
 
2008-02-29 10:12:44 AM  
cubsfan07: If you're posting on Fark, aren't you a little old for diapers?

Funny, I would swear I've seen you in threads before but at the same time it seems you're new around here.
 
2008-02-29 10:12:44 AM  
Up until about 10 days ago, we had three kids in diapers. A friend of ours suggested we switch to cloth to save money. I said I would love to if said friend was willing to wash the diapers and change my kids' diapers for me.

As you can probably guess, they (my kids) continued to wear disposables.
 
2008-02-29 10:12:50 AM  
Mayhem of the Black Underclass: cubsfan07: If you're posting on Fark, aren't you a little old for diapers?

No one is too old for a FETISH Depends, dumbass.


FIFY
 
2008-02-29 10:12:56 AM  
Devilbunee: The sprayer I built and added to the toilet line = no fecal matter in the washing machine. At least no more than normal. I know you can buy them premade, but it's so much cheaper to build one yourself.

so you wash stuff in the toilet like a person would do in prison?

/Would you like a glass of merlot? I make it in the terlet.
 
2008-02-29 10:13:49 AM  
As a parent of two, I say "You can keep your cloth diapers."

We always buy a pack or two of them to use as spit-up rags, but that's it. The new diapers are biodegradable to the point of being gone within a few months (or less) so I'm not to worried about the environment in that department. And I'll be damned if I spend the majority of my free time rinsing out and washing nasty poop towels.
 
2008-02-29 10:14:10 AM  
5 dollar milkshake: dittybopper: WolfinPHX:
Worst. Fruit. Ever.

What does Richard Simmons have to do with a thread about cloth diapers?

...[thinks a bit]...

Nevermind, I withdraw the question.

Damn both of you! Avacados and Richard Simmons are only my 2 FAVORITE things!


Isn't Perez Hilton the worst fruit ever?
 
2008-02-29 10:14:41 AM  
I wore cloth diapers so I'm getting a kick out of these replies.

And I graduated college.
 
2008-02-29 10:14:46 AM  
There must be a limit to this 'green' madness.

Mine is (was) not using cloth diapers.

I also hated having a diaper pail, and the rancid piss smell. I hated the wet bed sheets (and rubber mattress cover). And the wet clothes when they leaked, despite the rubber/plastic pants.

Disposable diapers are largely made from recycled materials (often from the pre-consumer side, but sometimes post-consumer). Look it up.

I don't feel guilty, and you aren't going to make me feel guilty, for using disposables on my kids. DIAF, green farkers.
 
2008-02-29 10:15:28 AM  
WolfinPHX: I'm thinking more of a shade like avocado.

Worst. Fruit. Ever.


No way! Good guacamole is AWESOME!
/mmmmm...guac
 
2008-02-29 10:15:32 AM  
paquerette: It's no worse than washing your underwear in the washing machine.

And when you have to keep 10 cloth ones at the ready for those days of the week that Grandma decided stir fry was a good idea to try?

...yeah no thanks I'll keep on with the disposables.
 
2008-02-29 10:15:49 AM  
Oh, and the other thing:

I can't stand cloth diapers, because stuff soaks through way to easily. Seriously. Every time I babysat my friend's kid who wore cloth, one single urination would go straight through her diaper, through her cloths, and into the lap of my jeans.

Screw that.
 
2008-02-29 10:15:56 AM  
I'm shocked by the number of FARKers who don't get the joke in the headline and think their own "green movement" comments are novel. Who are you folks, Phillip J. Fry?
 
2008-02-29 10:16:08 AM  
netcentric: IIRC...when a college did a study of the overall impact on the benefits...they found that the resources to wash them took was as detrimental to the environment. The clorine, water use, electricity. Or gas used by companies to drop and pic up.
That was Procter and Gamble that did that "study." Nuff said?

Yes, it takes water and soap and so forth to wash your cloth diapers, but it takes a lot of water and resources to manufacture disposable diapers. I once tipped a canoe over in the Susquehanna River just downstream from the P&G plant. Do. Not. Want.
 
2008-02-29 10:16:09 AM  
I've been using cloth diapers for my daughter since she was born and she's now a year and a half old. We use a diaper service, where the owners are great and offer an awesome rate so it ends up being quite a biatcheaper each month than going with disposables. The diapers are using snaps so it's almost as quick putting on the disposables, and they don't stink as much either. My only gripe is that it's really puffy so it's difficult getting pants on her sometimes.


One of my old co-workers uses cloth diapers, but washes them herself. To be honest, screw that nonsense, I dislike doing laundry enough as it is. If I've got to start cleaning crappy diapers, it's disposable all the way.
 
2008-02-29 10:16:50 AM  
its not even a true "green" movement. the washing and wastewater created from diaper cleanup causes more damage to the environment than throwing out a crap/petrochemical polymer burrito.
 
2008-02-29 10:17:06 AM  
My great-grandfather used cloth diapers for his kids. He'd throw the dirty ones on the radiator. When they dried, he's smack 'em on the wall to knock the solids off, and back on they went.

Times change.

I've got an 11-month-old. Ain't no way I'm taking a wriggling, frustrated baby and asking her to put her life on hold while I try to put the "solids" into the toilet, flush the toilet, put the diaper somewhere else, then return my attention to her.

In that time, she'll have managed to crawl into the kitchen, pried open the cabinet locks, and made a bomb out of ordinary chemicals. And we all know -that- would disrupt daddy's meth operation.

cubsfan07, buy a small pack of Cruisers in the next size up. Our little lady changed sizes basically overnight. Always have a few of the next size handy, because sometimes the old ones just quit workin'.
 
2008-02-29 10:17:27 AM  
Shadowknight: Oh, and the other thing:

I can't stand cloth diapers, because stuff soaks through way to easily. Seriously. Every time I babysat my friend's kid who wore cloth, one single urination would go straight through her diaper, through her clothes, and into the lap of my jeans.

Screw that.


Had to edit my crap.
 
2008-02-29 10:18:37 AM  
More like a brown movement, I think.
 
2008-02-29 10:19:52 AM  
Like boxes of shiat in your house? Get a cat.
Like washers fulled with shiat? Have a baby.
Like a yard full of shiat? Get a dog.

It's all shiat, people.
 
2008-02-29 10:20:34 AM  
Could someone please post the animated 'bouncing pooping guy' for my amusement?

KTHXBY
 
2008-02-29 10:20:41 AM  
hillbillypharmacist: We wash ourselves, too.

every month, wether we need it or not!
 
2008-02-29 10:21:28 AM  
imaginary +1 for subby
 
2008-02-29 10:21:44 AM  
I think anyone who is truly green would just let their child go feral and let them shiat in the yard
 
2008-02-29 10:22:10 AM  
More like a brown movement, I think.

What
did I just say?
 
2008-02-29 10:22:53 AM  
I was cloth diapered when I was a kid. and yes, Home schooled for most my early years, then put in a private Christian schools until my JR year of HS. That was my first public school. Kinda enjoyed it, you could slack and skip all you wanted and no one cared.
 
2008-02-29 10:23:19 AM  
paquerette: and sposies are full of freaky chemicals.

img258.imageshack.us
 
2008-02-29 10:23:34 AM  
We were using cloth diapers until my son started overfilling them. We discovered it would take 3 cloth diapers to contain it all, and that made it hard for him to walk, so we switched back to disposables. Doesn't help that at age 3 he's 3 1/2' tall.
 
2008-02-29 10:23:58 AM  
We do it. Diapers have changed. It isn't hard and I am glad we gave it a try.


Also, what most people who use disposables don't know is that you are supposed to scrape the shiat off of the diaper before putting it the trash anyway. Read the package.
 
2008-02-29 10:24:10 AM  
Locoz: More like a brown movement, I think.

What can Brown do for you?
 
2008-02-29 10:24:56 AM  
When i was a baby, my folks were so poor they couldn't afford diapers, so they used old potato sacks. Talk about a rough childhood!
 
2008-02-29 10:25:08 AM  
Worst. Fruit. Ever.

No, a most awesome fruit, great in guac and delicious cut into chunks on a salad. And even more awesome if you use the "Alton Brown" method of opening them up.

/Yeah, I know, it's not really his method.
//I learned it long before seeing his show.
 
2008-02-29 10:25:48 AM  
FTFA: "When you do the pre-rinse you would do those with just the diapers, but after that you can actually add in any laundry you would to wash in hot water," Sheppard said.

Um, no. We always washed in baking soda, then vinegar in the extra rinse cycle, sometimes adding Borax to the wash cycle. There's no way I'd wash diapers in with regular clothes.
 
2008-02-29 10:26:30 AM  
The correct way to tell everyone you are using cloth diapers but really use disposable.
 
2008-02-29 10:26:38 AM  
One of my strongest memories of having our first kid, and it's persisted now with our second, is how much the topic of shiat becomes part of your life. Color, consistency, what to do about it, etc all become daily topics of concern and conversation. Christ just last week I had a five minute conversation at Target with an expecting couple about the relative merits of different diaper genies. And this morning I happily told my wife that the toddler's near diarrhea was gone.

/will this shiat never end?
 
2008-02-29 10:26:40 AM  
Yeah, no.
 
2008-02-29 10:27:11 AM  
Just wait until I launch my company producing combination casual slacks and adult diapers.

I'm gonna call 'em "Loading Dockers."
 
2008-02-29 10:27:48 AM  
We have twin boys, and back in their diaper days there is no way we would consider dealing with wet poopy cloth diapers. Pampers were our salvation!

/ Back when they had Pampers Points we earned enough points to win the top prize, one of those Fisher-Price powered sports cars kids can drive.
// Did the same with Huggies Points, too!
 
2008-02-29 10:28:00 AM  
www.brandhype.org

He knows how to save mnoney and gas by using disposable diapers.
 
2008-02-29 10:28:30 AM  
We always washed in baking soda, then vinegar in the extra rinse cycle

Sounds like a science-fair volcano to me. Behold the eruption of Mount Poo-ji!
 
2008-02-29 10:28:42 AM  
We use a mix of cloth (when at home) and disposable (when going out) for our 7 month old and we did for our now 4 year old. It's pretty disgusting either way, but I don't find disposible any less disgusting. If you can't handle a little poop, then buy another stuffed animals. All sorts of ickiness comes out of a kid, poop being just one of the many joys.
 
2008-02-29 10:29:38 AM  
I wear cloth diapers, so I'm getting a kick out of some of these replies.
 
2008-02-29 10:30:04 AM  
Don't call it a comeback!
They've been here for years...
 
2008-02-29 10:32:06 AM  
KokoBWare: We use a mix of cloth (when at home) and disposable (when going out) for our 7 month old and we did for our now 4 year old.

It'd be interesting to find out which is cheaper--would you be willing to keep a log?
 
2008-02-29 10:32:45 AM  
Shadowknight: Oh, and the other thing:

I can't stand cloth diapers, because stuff soaks through way to easily. Seriously. Every time I babysat my friend's kid who wore cloth, one single urination would go straight through her diaper, through her cloths, and into the lap of my jeans.

Screw that.


Killing your hard on?
 
2008-02-29 10:33:31 AM  
We've been using cloth diapers with "snappi" closures for 6 months now on our son. If we had to pin them I'd probably have abandoned cloth for disposables.

Dirty diapers go into a pail and are washed every other day. I've lost all fear of the poopie.

img405.imageshack.us
 
2008-02-29 10:34:33 AM  
I_Can't_Believe_it's_not_Boutros: It'd be interesting to find out which is cheaper--would you be willing to keep a log?

Well, no, hence the diapers.
 
Ant
2008-02-29 10:34:55 AM  
Fark your cloth diapers. Modern disposables are where it's at. No safety pins, no washing, no leaking. They're a farking technological wonder!
 
2008-02-29 10:35:11 AM  
altinos: We were using cloth diapers until my son started overfilling them. We discovered it would take 3 cloth diapers to contain it all.

Together?
 
2008-02-29 10:35:29 AM  
TTITWOP

(This thread is tolerable w/o pics)
 
2008-02-29 10:35:47 AM  
altinos: We were using cloth diapers until my son started overfilling them. We discovered it would take 3 cloth diapers to contain it all, and that made it hard for him to walk, so we switched back to disposables. Doesn't help that at age 3 he's 3 1/2' tall.

OK out of curiosity, once they can walk and talk shouldn't they be using the bathroom like the rest of us? I mean I suppose I'd like the convenience of being able to crap my pants, but then I'd stink.
 
2008-02-29 10:37:07 AM  
Mayhem of the Black Underclass: Cloth is worse environmentally than disposable (new window)

More industrial waste, more energy used. Yes disposable take up more space in a landfill, but they also produce more methane, and therefore are a green bonus, in providing some of the energy they consume in the manufacture.


Your linked article is based on an insane supposition:

"Cloth diapers are used an average of 10 times per day. Disposable diapers are used an average of 5 times per day."

My kid is 22 months old, we use cloth diapers most of the time, disposables when she's sick or when she's got a rash (the diaper rash cream waterproofs the inside of the cloth diapers). There's no difference at all in the frequency of diaper changes between the two types.
 
2008-02-29 10:39:07 AM  
Cauchy_Riemann_equations: OK out of curiosity, once they can walk and talk shouldn't they be using the bathroom like the rest of us?

Depends.
 
2008-02-29 10:41:00 AM  
GungFu: The Onanist: I had to use cloth diapers for my son when he was a baby so I'm getting a kick out of these replies.

/He's in college now.


Cloth diapers makes you more intelligent?


Intelligent? What college did *you* go to?
 
2008-02-29 10:41:43 AM  
Onkel Buck: kevlar51: FTFA: What also works for her is the gas she saves from not having to make frequent trips to the store for diapers.

What a horrible argument. a) Buy more at once, and when you're doing other shopping, so you don't have to keep going out for diapers. b) you think those extra loads in the wash are free?

b) is a good point. What about all the water being used to do all that extra laundry and where does the soapy water go, that has to harm the enviroment to some extent.


You retards can justify anything if you try hard enough.
 
2008-02-29 10:42:24 AM  
Geez, people are as defensive over the diapers as they are re: circumcision.

I had 3 (17, 19 & 21 now). I used fitted cloth diapers at home (no pins!), but treated myself to disposables while travelling. I used diaper liners to make poopie removal easier, rinsed them before soaking, and it just wasn't that big a deal. Mind you, I was a stay-at-home mom during the early years; it might (probably would) have been different if I'd had fulltime employment as well.

One of my sons reacted badly to disposables, no matter what brand. He never got a rash from the cotton ones, but broke out something awful whenever I put a disposable on him. Bleaching agent, maybe?
 
2008-02-29 10:42:27 AM  
I used cloth diapers all the way with my boy, with those velcro waterproof covers. (And this was 15 years ago, so much for "comeback.") You put the dirty diapers in your special diaper pail with some vinegar to take out the piss smell. Then every couple of days you wash the diapers, alone. Don't use bleach, it just eats the diapers up and who cares if your diapers aren't blindingly white?

It wasn't any worse than dealing with a cat litter box. Isn't your kid worth as much time as your cat?
 
2008-02-29 10:42:36 AM  
My ex and I used cloth for our son (now 13). Wasn't that big of a deal. Actually helped when it came to potty training, not really helped other than it pushed us to train him early. He was out of diapers (except night) by 2.
 
2008-02-29 10:44:32 AM  
Evelle: I know WHERE they go, old timer. I just want to know if I need pins or fasteners.
Grocer: Well, no, they got them tape-ettes already on there. It's self-contained and fairly explanatory.
 
2008-02-29 10:44:42 AM  
cubsfan07: Devilbunee: We use cloth diapers and wash our own.

If you're posting on Fark, aren't you a little old for diapers?


Depends.
 
2008-02-29 10:45:16 AM  
I just can't wait until they invent the disposable computer. Follow ten links, then throw it away. They should make them out of radon and benzene.
 
2008-02-29 10:45:30 AM  
Linoleum_Blownapart: My kid is 22 months nearly 2 years old

FTFY
 
2008-02-29 10:48:24 AM  
Devilbunee: cubsfan07: Devilbunee: We use cloth diapers and wash our own.

If you're posting on Fark, aren't you a little old for diapers?

Depends.


I LOL'd.
 
2008-02-29 10:49:54 AM  
the_colonel: He knows how to save mnoney and gas by using disposable diapers.

Awesome. Now I have that weird, trance-inducing warbling kind-of a song stuck in my head.

It's like the mother of all earworms.
 
2008-02-29 10:50:47 AM  
Moving backwards is moving forward.
 
2008-02-29 10:52:08 AM  
"What also works for her is the gas she saves from not having to make frequent trips to the store for diapers."

Uh, it's called buying in bulk, lady.

I'm so sick of people making all these misguided, tiny adjustments to "save the environment" and acting all uppity when you don't do the same. You want to help the environment? Vote someone into the White House who's going to work to slow rainforest deforestation, reduce pollution and put money into research for a new source of energy.
 
2008-02-29 10:53:58 AM  
Why use diapers? Just throw the baby in the washing machine after it craps and the kid will be clean.
 
2008-02-29 10:54:37 AM  
We've used cloth for both kids and we like it a lot more. Yes, the initial cost is substantial but in the long run you save money. Cleaning isn't that bad.
 
2008-02-29 10:55:03 AM  
Billygoat Gruff: vilbunee: The sprayer I built and added to the toilet line = no fecal matter in the washing machine. At least no more than normal. I know you can buy them premade, but it's so much cheaper to build one yourself.

so you wash stuff in the toilet like a person would do in prison?

/Would you like a glass of merlot? I make it in the terlet.


The sprayer is more to dislodge the solid material. I prefer my prison wine made in garbage bags hidden under my bed.
 
2008-02-29 10:57:47 AM  
Green movement my arse. With gas prices, food costs, debt issues, foreclosures etc. etc people are simply trying to save money. I'm sure there are some out there for doing this for the environment but, me-thinks most are trying to save money and thats just as noble IMHO.

A newborn uses approx. 8-12 diapers per day which is approx $9,000-$11,000 for one year.
FTA: Austin Baby offers a diaper cleaning service that costs around $75 a month...about 900.00 a year.

I think the decision is an easy one.
 
2008-02-29 10:58:21 AM  
screamin_g: Together?

Yes, 3 layers of diapers.
 
2008-02-29 10:58:55 AM  
Cauchy_Riemann_equations: OK out of curiosity, once they can walk and talk shouldn't they be using the bathroom like the rest of us? I mean I suppose I'd like the convenience of being able to crap my pants, but then I'd stink.

Its not that difficult to get your toddler toilette trained by the time they are 2 to 3 years of age. By that time they should be walking and mostly talking.
 
2008-02-29 10:59:26 AM  
Cauchy_Riemann_equations: OK out of curiosity, once they can walk and talk shouldn't they be using the bathroom like the rest of us? I mean I suppose I'd like the convenience of being able to crap my pants, but then I'd stink.

Yes, because I'm sure every baby is potty trained before they're a year old.
 
2008-02-29 11:00:37 AM  
IdBeCrazyIf: Its not that difficult to get your toddler toilette trained by the time they are 2 to 3 years of age. By that time they should be walking and mostly talking.

Both my kids were walking and talking before a year old. We're working on potty training my son right now.
 
2008-02-29 11:00:39 AM  
BobtheFascist: Moving backwards is moving forward.

THIS. People are looking more and more to the past for ways to save money. Hell, I've had friends of mine (who have land) explain that if gas gets to 5.00 per gallon they are getting a horse and buggy. Even with grooming costs you save. Personally, I think many things will be headed that way.
 
2008-02-29 11:00:52 AM  
WolfinPHX: I'm thinking more of a shade like avocado.

Worst. Fruit. Ever.


Avocado goes great with raw salmon.

And green movements always make me think of Popeye.
 
2008-02-29 11:00:57 AM  
E Arkhe
"I'm so sick of people making all these misguided, tiny adjustments to "save the environment" and acting all uppity when you don't do the same. You want to help the environment? Vote someone into the White House who's going to work to slow rainforest deforestation, reduce pollution and put money into research for a new source of energy."


What people don't seem to realize is that the environmentally elected officials are then going to put the onus back on us to do our part. That includes sacrificing things like carpooling(like through ridesearch.com) and even diapers.
 
2008-02-29 11:02:19 AM  
StrikitRich: Devilbunee

Don't have one. All I have are bathroom and kitchen sinks.
 
2008-02-29 11:02:22 AM  
Linoleum_Blownapart: Your linked article is based on an insane supposition:

"Cloth diapers are used an average of 10 times per day. Disposable diapers are used an average of 5 times per day."

My kid is 22 months old, we use cloth diapers most of the time, disposables when she's sick or when she's got a rash (the diaper rash cream waterproofs the inside of the cloth diapers). There's no difference at all in the frequency of diaper changes between the two types.


First of all, they were comparing total number of diapers used, other farkers have said (see above) that they had to use more than 1 cloth diaper to hold all the shiat in. And secondly, aren't 2 year olds less likely to have random bowel movement and urinary explosions than newborns? Like they have a schedule and only crap once a day and pee five times a day?

And because of the absorbents they put in disposables, your kids don't go to the bathroom less, you just change them less, because they don't feel wet, and don't complain.

Plus I don't think this changes the fact that cloth diapers pound for pound (dry) use twice as much energy, and disposable take up twice as much space in landfills. So you should do what makes you feel better and not say that either one or the is "better" for the earth.

/Also shouldn't you be potty training? We're getting our 18 mo old accustomed to the whole bathroom experience, he can flush a toilet and wash his hands, but he keeps peeing into the tub instead of the toilet.
 
2008-02-29 11:03:03 AM  
sxacho: Funny, I would swear I've seen you in threads before but at the same time it seems you're new around here.

Mayhem of the Black Underclass: No one is too old for a FETISH, dumbass.

img524.imageshack.us



stucka: cubsfan07, buy a small pack of Cruisers in the next size up. Our little lady changed sizes basically overnight. Always have a few of the next size handy, because sometimes the old ones just quit workin'.


What's the difference between Swaddlers and Cruisers? Right now he's 13 lbs, and we use the "2-3" Swaddlers that cover 12-18 lbs.
 
2008-02-29 11:04:01 AM  
Polar Bear Cub: A newborn uses approx. 8-12 diapers per day which is approx $9,000-$11,000 for one year.

What the fark math are you on?

12 a day is 4380 for the year
A box will run you about 25 for 60-80. Even using 60 as the low end (which would be wrong since the smaller sizes net you larger amounts in the box) that's 73 boxes a year. At 25 a box you spend $1825.

Even accounting for some farked up inflation or region pricing where the diapers are 100 a box it's still only 7300 a year.
 
2008-02-29 11:05:54 AM  
Simple fact- A microbe will develop that eats plastic. Diapers, 5-gallon buckets, grocery bags all will be digested in the landfill by opportunistic microorganisms. It's happening already.

"Recycling" is profit-motivated. Municipalities PAY to have their solid waste interred. But they GET PAID for their recyclables. When you separate your trash you're doing nothing but providing profits for your government to waste.
 
2008-02-29 11:06:14 AM  
Polar Bear Cub: A newborn uses approx. 8-12 diapers per day which is approx $9,000-$11,000 for one year.

Bullshiat... I pay less than $100 a month for diapers for my newborn.

By your math 12*30=360 Diapers. $916 month / 360 diapers. In your world diapers are $2.55 each.
 
2008-02-29 11:08:22 AM  
We're using disposables. Started off with Kirkland but now at 6 months Huggies are a little cheaper. After seeing Penn & Teller's Bullshiat! about recycling, I don't care about filling up landfills, we've got plenty of space for them.
 
2008-02-29 11:09:24 AM  
The thing is, modern diapers make kids to comfortable after they shiat themselves, which makes them less willing to be potty-trained. The cloth diapers are a nightmare to clean, but they are more affordable and your kids will learn to poo sooner.
 
2008-02-29 11:10:23 AM  
kevlar51: FTFA: What also works for her is the gas she saves from not having to make frequent trips to the store for diapers.

What a horrible argument. a) Buy more at once, and when you're doing other shopping, so you don't have to keep going out for diapers. b) you think those extra loads in the wash are free?


THIS

And they're cheaper when you buy in bulk. The savings on diapers and formula pay for my warehouse club membership 20x over.
 
2008-02-29 11:11:48 AM  
Mayhem of the Black Underclass: he can flush a toilet and wash his hands, but he keeps peeing into the tub instead of the toilet.

"Everything that is old is new again" Wait till he gets to college, he'll probably start doing the same thing.

/No, not that I *ever* have.
 
2008-02-29 11:11:49 AM  
IdBeCrazyIf: ..What the fark math are you on?


Got the information from a couple websites. So please spare your outrage for them neh?
Baby costs
If the math is wrong, then thank you for pointing it out :) But I still find it hard to believe that it is in any ways "close" in cost.

Even accounting for some farked up inflation or region pricing where the diapers are 100 a box it's still only 7300 a year.

"ONLY." Perhaps that phrase applies to you my friend. But, that seems like a hell of alot to me :)
 
2008-02-29 11:12:27 AM  
skankboy: See above :)
 
2008-02-29 11:12:36 AM  
skankboy: By your math 12*30=360 Diapers. $916 month / 360 diapers. In your world diapers are $2.55 each.

Hey, cut some slack. Maybe this is the kid in question:

www.1-800-posters.com

/so incredibly hotlinked
 
2008-02-29 11:12:41 AM  
That's what Madden does, and it works for her. What also works for her is the gas she saves from not having to make frequent trips to the store for diapers.

www.slapyo.com
 
2008-02-29 11:12:44 AM  
minoridiot: We used a diaper service for our kids. It worked well and it ended up being slightly cheaper than disposables. To was pretty easy too -- all we had to do is empty the solids into the toilet and place the soiled diaper into the service's container.

Congrats. You just made me collapse with a debilitating case of the heebie-jeebies for a few minutes.
 
2008-02-29 11:12:48 AM  
Cloth diapers are corny.
 
2008-02-29 11:15:03 AM  
I don't agree with Polar Bear Club's math either, but cloth diapers are still cheaper, especially with multiple kids.

We bought 24 one-size-fits-all diapers for $18/pc, so around $450 total. Compared to ~$1000/yr for 2 years, it's a significant savings. And once you have them, you don't need to buy diapers again, even with more kids.

These are "high tech" diapers - they don't leak, they keep the baby dry with an absorbent layer, and they wrap with velcro, not saftey pins.

Most people opposed to cloth diapers still think they are the equivalent of a washrag pinned to the baby's butt, which isn't the case.
 
2008-02-29 11:15:55 AM  
For those doing the math:
New disposable diapers are so comfortable that it takes longer to toilet train kids. Children who use cloth diapers tend to toilet train earlier.

I would assume this would make quite a difference in the impact on both the environment and your pocketbook.

(I'm more interested in the impact on my washing machine -- my kids use disposable)
 
2008-02-29 11:16:08 AM  
archanoid: Cloth diapers are corny.

Depends on what the kid's been eating.
 
2008-02-29 11:16:19 AM  
Polar Bear Cub: A newborn uses approx. 8-12 diapers per day which is approx $9,000-$11,000 for one year.

The child is also not a newborn for a full year.
 
2008-02-29 11:17:17 AM  
dustygrimp: Congrats. You just made me collapse with a debilitating case of the heebie-jeebies for a few minutes.

But that's the fun part. My wife screaming "Out of my way! Steaming turd coming through!" as she ran off to the bathroom to empty the diaper into the toilet.
 
2008-02-29 11:18:50 AM  
DallasGodLovesYou: E Arkhe
"I'm so sick of people making all these misguided, tiny adjustments to "save the environment" and acting all uppity when you don't do the same. You want to help the environment? Vote someone into the White House who's going to work to slow rainforest deforestation, reduce pollution and put money into research for a new source of energy."

What people don't seem to realize is that the environmentally elected officials are then going to put the onus back on us to do our part. That includes sacrificing things like carpooling(like through ridesearch.com) and even diapers.


They can suggest we do such things (and I agree with carpooling, definitely - diapers are another matter) but I can't see a president dictating trivial things like that. There's no point in starting small. The "green" movement is just something people use to feel less guilty...the real problems are going unsolved, and the issue of landfills is just a drop in an ocean of troubles that need solving.
 
2008-02-29 11:19:57 AM  
Polar Bear Cub: "ONLY." Perhaps that phrase applies to you my friend. But, that seems like a hell of alot to me :)

HAH... you'll think that diapers are pennies compared to farking formula. I thanked the heathen gods the day my crotch spawn went to whole milk.

..and the website noted that it was 8k to 11k for (diapers, formula, etc..) ie everything a baby needs
 
2008-02-29 11:20:20 AM  
Polar Bear Cub: IdBeCrazyIf: ..What the fark math are you on?


Got the information from a couple websites. So please spare your outrage for them neh?
Baby costs
If the math is wrong, then thank you for pointing it out :) But I still find it hard to believe that it is in any ways "close" in cost.

Even accounting for some farked up inflation or region pricing where the diapers are 100 a box it's still only 7300 a year.

"ONLY." Perhaps that phrase applies to you my friend. But, that seems like a hell of alot to me :)


I like the way you quoted that link. It wasn't obvious from your presentation that the quoted figure ($9k-$11k) included diapers, formula, baby furniture, clothing, baby gear, etc.)

Citations work better if they're presented in context. Just an FYI.
 
2008-02-29 11:21:08 AM  
jbensley: I don't agree with Polar Bear Club's math either....

Again, see above. How about sending your corrected "math calculations" to them neh? Thank you all for pointing out the failings of math on a baby website where the information was gathered in the first place :) I certainly learned my lesson. Sweet Jeebus.

Website used
 
2008-02-29 11:21:26 AM  
img407.imageshack.us
 
2008-02-29 11:22:31 AM  
Ochiba:
Citations work better if they're presented in context. Just an FYI.


Indeed :):) LOL! Never again :)
 
2008-02-29 11:22:52 AM  
Why can't you be for cloth diapers and not for the "green movement"? When/if I have children I will be using cloth diapers, I think they are better than all the dyes etc. that are put into disposable diapers. I might change my mind once I have to clean shiat off them every day, but my mom suffered through it and she is wimp!!

I had to babysit when I was younger, about 14 years old. This 3 year old was not quite potty trained and would shiat in her pants. I had to take her underwear off, somehow get the shiat in the toilet and then scrub the shiat off her underwear, put it in the laundry room and give her a bath....actually it wasn't sooooo bad.
 
2008-02-29 11:25:03 AM  
Mayhem of the Black Underclass
Also shouldn't you be potty training? We're getting our 18 mo old accustomed to the whole bathroom experience, he can flush a toilet and wash his hands, but he keeps peeing into the tub instead of the toilet.

That's one of the most ignorant statements I have ever heard. To tell someone the should be training a child to potty train at a certain time is stupid and insincere. Some children are ready to use the potty at 18 months. Some aren't until they are 3. Some kids walk at 12 months. Some at 9. All kids are different. Your statement is idiotic and stupid. And your kid is definitely not better than anyone else's because he's on the early side of the learning curve.

That being said, cloth diapers aren't as big of a hassle as everyone is making them out to be. We have a four month old. She goes through 10-12 diapers a day. We have a stash of about 24 cloth diapers. We wash them every other day. It's not that big of a deal to do one extra load of laundry. It's not like you're hand washing them. You throw it in the washer, wait 30 minutes, throw them in the dryer, wait 60 minutes, fold, and go. Is everyone here to stupid to realize you can still do things while the laundry is going? And I'm not blasting the disposable crowd either. And for those who are grossed about the waste in the washer? I don't know about you, but the water line that goes from my washer, and the one that goes from my toilet all end up in the same place...the sewer. We use the cloths because she pees so much they'd soak through the 'sposies in one piss. The cloth ones they make these days are thick, uber-absorbant, and as someone said earlier, really cute. No freaky chemicals. Just wool, unwoven silk, or cotton. And the cost is the same as 'sposies, when you add everything together.
 
2008-02-29 11:25:12 AM  
Polar Bear Cub: Ochiba:
Citations work better if they're presented in context. Just an FYI.

Indeed :):) LOL! Never again :)


Hehe, I went to the link because I couldn't believe that number. My daughter is 4 now, and that was one helluva increase from what I remember.

Happy trails!
 
2008-02-29 11:25:56 AM  
TwoLegit2Quit: I had to babysit when I was younger, about 14 years old. This 3 year old was not quite potty trained and would shiat in her pants. I had to take her underwear off, somehow get the shiat in the toilet and then scrub the shiat off her underwear, put it in the laundry room and give her a bath....actually it wasn't sooooo bad.

Yeah except that 2 and 3 year olds bowl movements look like something you let loose the afternoon following an all nighter pub crawl and eating a grand slam at dennys at 4 in the morning.
 
2008-02-29 11:26:19 AM  
dustygrimp: The child is also not a newborn for a full year.

*Sigh* Rolls eyes. Whatever you say man, I believe you :)
 
2008-02-29 11:26:40 AM  
TwoLegit2Quit: Why can't you be for cloth diapers and not for the "green movement"? When/if I have children I will be using cloth diapers, I think they are better than all the dyes etc. that are put into disposable diapers. I might change my mind once I have to clean shiat off them every day, but my mom suffered through it and she is wimp!!

I'm curious about this, because a lot of people have mentioned nonspecific "chemicals" and "dyes." Which are you referring to? Is there any data to support the notion that disposable diapers are any worse for the baby?
 
2008-02-29 11:26:41 AM  
I'll see your cloth nappies and throw in lady nappies...

http://diaperwear.com/mooncare/lunapads.htm
 
2008-02-29 11:26:42 AM  
Mayhem of the Black Underclass: Linoleum_Blownapart: Your linked article is based on an insane supposition:

"Cloth diapers are used an average of 10 times per day. Disposable diapers are used an average of 5 times per day."

My kid is 22 months old, we use cloth diapers most of the time, disposables when she's sick or when she's got a rash (the diaper rash cream waterproofs the inside of the cloth diapers). There's no difference at all in the frequency of diaper changes between the two types.

First of all, they were comparing total number of diapers used, other farkers have said (see above) that they had to use more than 1 cloth diaper to hold all the shiat in. And secondly, aren't 2 year olds less likely to have random bowel movement and urinary explosions than newborns? Like they have a schedule and only crap once a day and pee five times a day?

And because of the absorbents they put in disposables, your kids don't go to the bathroom less, you just change them less, because they don't feel wet, and don't complain.

Plus I don't think this changes the fact that cloth diapers pound for pound (dry) use twice as much energy, and disposable take up twice as much space in landfills. So you should do what makes you feel better and not say that either one or the is "better" for the earth.

/Also shouldn't you be potty training? We're getting our 18 mo old accustomed to the whole bathroom experience, he can flush a toilet and wash his hands, but he keeps peeing into the tub instead of the toilet.


The business with using more than one cloth diaper to hold it all in is way outside my experience. Are they not using the covers?

and Secondly : No, my toddler has between 1 and 3 BM's a day, and while awake gets changed every two hours or so, and has almost always wet the diaper. This has not struck us, the daycare, or our friends-with-kids who babysit as weird.

So you should do what makes you feel better and not say that either one or the is "better" for the earth. I didn't make that claim. We use cloth out of personal preference. My opinion is that it's about a dead heat on that front, with the advantage going to whether your local water supply is plentiful or not.

Our daycare uses a strict two-hour changing schedule for all the kids in the toddler room, regardless of diaper type.

/Also shouldn't you be potty training? We are. She's fascinated with her potty and insists on spending a few minutes sitting on it when she's had a diaper removed. She does the wiping and the flushing, and the one time she succeeded in peeing it scared her so much she stood up and ran down the hall, whizzing away. She's also experimenting with lying/manipulation - she doesn't like telling us when she has to go, or tells us she has when she hasn't. Currently the curiousity of manipulating her parents is outweighing any discomfort.
 
2008-02-29 11:27:23 AM  
Cubs300: And for those who are grossed about the waste in the washer? I don't know about you, but the water line that goes from my washer, and the one that goes from my toilet all end up in the same place...the sewer.

Well, you convinced me. There is no difference and I should just start shiatting in my washer since it all ends up in the same place anyway.
 
2008-02-29 11:28:02 AM  
Ochiba:
Hehe, I went to the link because I couldn't believe that number. My daughter is 4 now, and that was one helluva increase from what I remember.
Happy trails!


I don't have children so perhaps thats why I believed it. Either way, cloth diapers seem to be cheaper in the long haul :) Happy trails to you as well :) And good luck with your family!
 
2008-02-29 11:29:33 AM  
Linoleum_Blownapart: We are. She's fascinated with her potty....

That made me laugh :) Thanks for sharing!
 
2008-02-29 11:29:44 AM  
skankboy: Polar Bear Cub: A newborn uses approx. 8-12 diapers per day which is approx $9,000-$11,000 for one year.

Bullshiat... I pay less than $100 a month for diapers for my newborn.

By your math 12*30=360 Diapers. $916 month / 360 diapers. In your world diapers are $2.55 each.


Maybe buying cloth diapers and then disposing them after one use. Best of both worlds!
 
2008-02-29 11:33:26 AM  
Polar Bear Cub: Ochiba:
Hehe, I went to the link because I couldn't believe that number. My daughter is 4 now, and that was one helluva increase from what I remember.
Happy trails!

I don't have children so perhaps thats why I believed it. Either way, cloth diapers seem to be cheaper in the long haul :) Happy trails to you as well :) And good luck with your family!


I thought they'd be cheaper in the long run too. I tried them for a bit, but found the negligible cost savings had a very hard time competing with the time and effort commitment. It's a personal preference thing. The environmental impacts are there for both in varying degrees.
 
2008-02-29 11:33:39 AM  
Polar Bear Cub: Green movement my arse. With gas prices, food costs, debt issues, foreclosures etc. etc people are simply trying to save money. I'm sure there are some out there for doing this for the environment but, me-thinks most are trying to save money and thats just as noble IMHO.

A newborn uses approx. 8-12 diapers per day which is approx $9,000-$11,000 for one year.
FTA: Austin Baby offers a diaper cleaning service that costs around $75 a month...about 900.00 a year.

I think the decision is an easy one.


Uh, your math is so farked up I don't know what to say. At an average of 10 diapers a day, 365 days a year, $.14 per diaper (Huggies 264-count for under $37 at your local wholesale club) I get $416 or less than half the cost of the diaper service. It's slightly more expensive when they get bigger and you only get a 180 or 200 count for the same price but it sure ain't twice as much.
 
2008-02-29 11:34:19 AM  
Have used cloth "Fuzzibuns" diapers for 1 year now. Bought the small size for $350 and they fit her for about 5 months. When she outgrew them the wife sold them on ebay for $300. $50 for 5 months of diapers. Cleaning them is not so bad. My daughter only shiats about once a day so it's not like you have to spray the solids out everytime you change a diaper.
Thought using cloth would suck. But it doesn't. In fact every time I walk down the diaper aisle in the market, I smile. I can't farking believe what they get for a package of diapers.
 
2008-02-29 11:35:50 AM  
Harry Freakstorm: Supposedly, you are supposed to clean the crap out of disposables before doing the disposal part. From the ones I've seen in parking lots and on the side of the highway, they don't do that. Removing the crap reduces the amount in the landfill and that is how the exstimate the amount diapers occupy in landfills.

No kids.


Not in this lifetime.

Crap is biodegradable. Let it fertilize the landfills so that future generations may enjoy the fruit of poop!

/4 week old baby
//Cleaning him is enough for me
 
2008-02-29 11:35:55 AM  
This kind of issue is why we have cats.
 
2008-02-29 11:36:40 AM  
To be really environmentally friendly, you should let your baby run around bare bottom in the back yard. He or she will naturally fertilize your land. Kind of like those auto-pilot robotic lawn mowers. Our dear mother nature provides natural wipes - in fact, they grow on trees. If everyone did this, my math shows that it will cool the earth by 4 degrees in 25 years.
 
2008-02-29 11:37:50 AM  
Jument: This kind of issue is why we have cats.

You should use cloth litter then, and save the environment from the evils of cat litter.
 
2008-02-29 11:38:42 AM  
robodog:
Uh, your math is so farked up I don't know what to say....



Yeah, yeah. Old news and already explained. Read the previous comments please. K.Thanx.
 
2008-02-29 11:39:40 AM  
I liked it, submitter.
 
2008-02-29 11:40:34 AM  
Ochiba: I thought they'd be cheaper in the long run too. I tried them for a bit, but found the negligible cost savings had a very hard time competing with the time and effort commitment. It's a personal preference thing. The environmental impacts are there for both in varying degrees.

Thats an interesting thought and thank you for your insight:) Perhaps its more of a "time issue" then? Especially with working full time?
 
2008-02-29 11:42:07 AM  
Polar Bear Cub: Ochiba: I thought they'd be cheaper in the long run too. I tried them for a bit, but found the negligible cost savings had a very hard time competing with the time and effort commitment. It's a personal preference thing. The environmental impacts are there for both in varying degrees.

Thats an interesting thought and thank you for your insight:) Perhaps its more of a "time issue" then? Especially with working full time?


Time is all that is worth saving, IMO. :)
 
2008-02-29 11:43:32 AM  
E Arkhe: "What also works for her is the gas she saves from not having to make frequent trips to the store for diapers."

Uh, it's called buying in bulk, lady.

I'm so sick of people making all these misguided, tiny adjustments to "save the environment" and acting all uppity when you don't do the same. You want to help the environment? Vote someone into the White House who's going to work to slow rainforest deforestation, reduce pollution and put money into research for a new source of energy.



I don't see how we can do this, all of the rain forests belong to other nations and we cann't stop them from doing what they want to do with their land.

buying it = to expensive
paying so they don't destroy it = to expensive
taking it = i don't see us doing that.

i can't think if a way we could stop it
 
2008-02-29 11:43:48 AM  
Polar Bear Cub: robodog:
Uh, your math is so farked up I don't know what to say....


Yeah, yeah. Old news and already explained. Read the previous comments please. K.Thanx.


Sorry, got distracted by work between hitting quote and adding the comment.

/back to Farking
 
2008-02-29 11:44:07 AM  
Another cloth diaper user, here. We have been cloth diapering our 2.5yr old daughter since she was 8 months old. It's easy, I can certainly take her out of the house with them, and normal clothing fits over them.

There are a million kinds of diapers out there now. We use bumgenius diapers for her preschool (they have no problems using them) and going out and about. Nighttime took a little tweaking but we finally settled with fitteds and wool that work perfectly.

I wish I'd known about wool when my son was born in 1999 - would have saved me so many bedsheet changes!

If you don't want to cloth diaper - don't. No one is better than you for doing it. We started because after she outgrew the size 2 Pampers Swaddlers everything gave her a rash or leaked. The possibility of maybe saving some money over the next couple of years was nice, too.

Laundry has been negligible - I just run them through (after the cold prerinse) with our towels, every other day.

She's going into trainers now and working on potty training, thankfully - while I love cloth better than disposables, I won't be sad to say goodbye to diapering entirely.
 
2008-02-29 11:46:23 AM  
robodog: Sorry, got distracted by work between hitting quote and adding the comment.
/back to Farking



NP :) I got "Farked" this morning for not paying attention and rightly so :)
 
2008-02-29 11:47:03 AM  
Ochiba: Time is all that is worth saving, IMO. :)

Indeed. Well-said
 
2008-02-29 11:50:19 AM  
Linoleum_Blownapart: The business with using more than one cloth diaper to hold it all in is way outside my experience. Are they not using the covers?

We were using covers with three layers of diaper. Still leaked.
 
2008-02-29 11:50:38 AM  
Linoleum_Blownapart:Your linked article is based on an insane supposition:

"Cloth diapers are used an average of 10 times per day. Disposable diapers are used an average of 5 times per day."

No, my toddler ...and while awake gets changed every two hours or so.


So for the 16 hrs a day that the kid is awake (assuming you change after naps, so don't include naps in sleep time) You still change your kid 8 times a day.

How is 10 diapers an insane supposition again? Especially if you average the number of diapers from birth to potty training.

/And I appreciate your candor.
//It looks as though other people don't appreciate mine.
 
2008-02-29 11:51:02 AM  
Linoleum_Blownapart:
/Also shouldn't you be potty training? We are. She's fascinated with her potty and insists on spending a few minutes sitting on it when she's had a diaper removed. She does the wiping and the flushing, and the one time she succeeded in peeing it scared her so much she stood up and ran down the hall, whizzing away.


That made me laugh!

One thing I learned about potty training boys. Do not ever talk to them when they are peeing. They WILL turn to look at you.
 
2008-02-29 11:52:38 AM  
Ya know ... after all the farking doom and gloom last year of the Atlanta region going through one of the worst droughts its had in nearly 100 years even hearing about this and thinking about the amount of water involved in cleaning them is just disturbing ...
 
2008-02-29 11:53:37 AM  
Prank Call of Cthulhu: Like boxes of shiat in your house? Get a cat.
Like washers fulled with shiat? Have a baby.
Like a yard full of shiat? Get a dog.

It's all shiat, people.


This is why I've trained my dog to shiat in other people's yard.
 
2008-02-29 11:55:18 AM  
Black at first.
Then yellowish, with sesame seed lookin' stuff in it
Finally, good old fashioned brown.

The more you know.
 
2008-02-29 11:59:50 AM  
Mayhem of the Black Underclass: Linoleum_Blownapart:Your linked article is based on an insane supposition:

"Cloth diapers are used an average of 10 times per day. Disposable diapers are used an average of 5 times per day."

No, my toddler ...and while awake gets changed every two hours or so.


So for the 16 hrs a day that the kid is awake (assuming you change after naps, so don't include naps in sleep time) You still change your kid 8 times a day.

How is 10 diapers an insane supposition again? Especially if you average the number of diapers from birth to potty training.

/And I appreciate your candor.
//It looks as though other people don't appreciate mine.


I wasn't objecting to 10 as too many, my reaction is that 5 is too few.

On a typical day she gets :
- 1st when she wakes up (6am)
- 2nd before being loaded in the car for daycare (8am)
- 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th on the 2-hour schedule at daycare (9am, 11pm, 1pm, 3pm)
- 7th when we get her home(5pm)
- 8th for bedtime(7pm)

Naptime is about an hour or so after lunch, before the 3pm change.

Which of these would we skip with disposables? I suppose we could drop the 2nd change, as that's mostly to switch diaper types. We use the sqaure ones wiht covers at home and the insert ones at daycare. That's just one per day though, not half!
 
2008-02-29 12:00:16 PM  
Cubs300: That's one of the most ignorant statements I have ever heard. To tell someone the should be training a child to potty train at a certain time is stupid and insincere. Some children are ready to use the potty at 18 months. Some aren't until they are 3. Some kids walk at 12 months. Some at 9. All kids are different. Your statement is idiotic and stupid. And your kid is definitely not better than anyone else's because he's on the early side of the learning curve.


Um, some people believe that children should be potty trained at birth (new window). So how does my thinking that a 2 yr old should be in the potty training process qualify as 'ignorant'
 
2008-02-29 12:03:00 PM  
strathmeyer: Prank Call of Cthulhu: Like boxes of shiat in your house? Get a cat.
Like washers fulled with shiat? Have a baby.
Like a yard full of shiat? Get a dog.

It's all shiat, people.

This is why I've trained my dog to shiat in other people's yard.


Hehe, my neighbors still puzzle over how they always end up with dog shiat in the hot tub on their deck.

I don't own a dog. I do own a snow shovel.

/my lawn. off it
 
2008-02-29 12:03:15 PM  
cubsfan07: You think that's FUNNY your posting?

Nosir, I think that's snark.

/zing?
 
2008-02-29 12:06:22 PM  
Mayhem of the Black Underclass: Cubs300: That's one of the most ignorant statements I have ever heard. To tell someone the should be training a child to potty train at a certain time is stupid and insincere. Some children are ready to use the potty at 18 months. Some aren't until they are 3. Some kids walk at 12 months. Some at 9. All kids are different. Your statement is idiotic and stupid. And your kid is definitely not better than anyone else's because he's on the early side of the learning curve.


Um, some people believe that children should be potty trained at birth (new window). So how does my thinking that a 2 yr old should be in the potty training process qualify as 'ignorant'


Mayhem was correct, my child is potty training. As far as I've read, potty training is complete for most kids around or about their third birthday, with some a few months earlier, some a few months later.

/Traditional potty training, that is. Elimination Communication relies on the parent to do the dressing/undressing, wiping up and getting the kid to the loo in time until they're big enough to do their own walking and dressing.
 
2008-02-29 12:08:15 PM  
Linoleum_Blownapart: I wasn't objecting to 10 as too many, my reaction is that 5 is too few.

On a typical day she gets :
- 1st when she wakes up (6am)
- 2nd before being loaded in the car for daycare (8am)
- 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th on the 2-hour schedule at daycare (9am, 11pm, 1pm, 3pm)
- 7th when we get her home(5pm)
- 8th for bedtime(7pm)

Naptime is about an hour or so after lunch, before the 3pm change.

Which of these would we skip with disposables? I suppose we could drop the 2nd change, as that's mostly to switch diaper types. We use the sqaure ones wiht covers at home and the insert ones at daycare. That's just one per day though, not half!


I'll see what the schedule is like for diapers at my house, but I usually only do 2 of the changes, and only when I can smell them.
 
2008-02-29 12:12:09 PM  
I used cloth diapers for all four of my boys...they're now 6 thru 14. Just figured if I didn't wear paper panties, why should they? Can't be comfy and there are no rashes with cloth diapers. My boys were all potty trained completely between 17 months and 27 months, depending on the kid. Probably has to do with using cloth; they can feel the wetness more and realize they don't like the feeling. Or the mommy isn't as lazy about teaching them to use a toilet and is tired of the cloth diapers.
As a side note: It always seemed so strange to me to see the parents that used disposable wrap up the used diaper into a tight little bundle...that will likely not decompose for 500 years, their little snowflake's shiat is a precious gift for future generations to come.
 
2008-02-29 12:13:47 PM  
I just shiat my pants, so I'm really getting a kick out of these comments.
 
2008-02-29 12:16:39 PM  
I really should have expected this. I must be slipping in my old age. I forgot that every time some movement gets rolling, folks tend to go a bit insane.

I should have gotten the hint when I saw that 'Organic indoor toilet' on TV where the waste composts and you dump the stuff in your garden as fertilizer.

I've not changed any diapers in years, but I recall my Mom having that darn diaper pail reeking in the bathroom for my younger siblings. I also recall the mess and hassle of changing a fully loaded diaper, fiddling with those safety pins and getting poked trying not to poke the wiggling baby and treating diaper rash. Then, I recall the cloths line in the back yard (pre-electric cloths dryer years) being filled with diapers drying. Don't forget the diaper pants used to keep the soggy things from wetting everything they touched before the kid gets changed. Then the diaper bag used to carry soiled diapers home from the store.

Disposable diapers, IMO, are one of the best inventions ever! Though, unfortunately, along with the disposables came the tendency for some disgusting people to change their stinking kid in a store parking lot and throw the used diaper out the window.

Just because you're concerned about the environment doesn't mean we need to go back to the early 1900s. My Mom had a wash machine but no dryer in the 50s. The machine had no spin cycle -- since no one invented it yet. She ran the cloths through a set of hard wood, powered rollers to wring them out and then hung them on the cloths line.

Basically, it saved a lot of power, but added to her work load. I also recall the great big boxes of powdered washing soap and the boxes of borax followed by the big jugs of bleach.

BTW Diaper services might seem to be the way to go, but as demand goes up, so does the cost. Plus, you might not be wasting resources, but they are because of you.

See, there's the gas in those diaper trucks -- which do frequent stop and go which wastes gas, there's the potential of spreading disease. (After all, the trucks are full of human sewage.) At the plant, they use major volumes of water and power to clean the diapers, dry and fold them, not to mention industrial sized containers of detergent. Their waste water probably goes into the local sewer, where additional things have to be added by the sewage plant to process the additional volume of water.

Then there's the sterilization process, chemical or heat, needed because you never know whose kid has Hepatitis.

Now, they get a discount for using industrial volumes of water and power, but in the long run, they'll contribute more waste and use more resources than you would by buying disposables.
 
2008-02-29 12:16:53 PM  
cubsfan07: I think Swaddlers are tighter, supposed to be more reassuring to the little ones. The standard line is Baby Dry for the bigger kids. Our girl was wriggling at an earlier age, and I think Cruisers are supposed to allow more freedom of movement.

Freedom to move? She still feels free to have movements ... hrm.
 
2008-02-29 12:16:58 PM  
Polar Bear Cub: IdBeCrazyIf: ..What the fark math are you on?


Got the information from a couple websites. So please spare your outrage for them neh?
Baby costs
If the math is wrong, then thank you for pointing it out :) But I still find it hard to believe that it is in any ways "close" in cost.

Even accounting for some farked up inflation or region pricing where the diapers are 100 a box it's still only 7300 a year.

"ONLY." Perhaps that phrase applies to you my friend. But, that seems like a hell of alot to me :)


From your link :

If you go back to work right away, childcare can cost as much as $3,000-$4,500 in your baby's first year, not to mention the higher insurance premium for adding an additional person.

I must be living on another planet. Around here childcare for the first year cost $1750/month (plus some commuting and parking costs), which is $21,000, not $4,500. Are they assuming you'll hire an illegal under the table?

And the added healthcare premium? +$24/month to go from Worker+One to Family. Is that really worth mentioning in the same figure?
 
2008-02-29 12:20:27 PM  
And the added healthcare premium? +$24/month to go from Worker+One to Family. Is that really worth mentioning in the same figure?

Whoah-- my plan went up over $100 for that change.

Is your company hiring?
 
2008-02-29 12:23:21 PM  
xxBirdMadGirlxx: the_colonel: He knows how to save mnoney and gas by using disposable diapers.

Awesome. Now I have that weird, trance-inducing warbling kind-of a song stuck in my head.

It's like the mother of all earworms.


Yes, yes it is. Thanks a bunch.
 
2008-02-29 12:29:19 PM  
Rik01:
Now, they get a discount for using industrial volumes of water and power, but in the long run, they'll contribute more waste and use more resources than you would by buying disposables.



I think it's difficult to come to a conclusion like that without actually doing the math.

Mayhem of the Black Underclass posted a good article looking at the numbers, but Linoleum_Blownapart did point out an important flaw in it.
 
2008-02-29 12:30:07 PM  
Linoleum_Blownapart: From your link: "If you go back to work right away, childcare can cost as much as $3,000-$4,500 in your baby's first year, not to mention the higher insurance premium for adding an additional person..." I must be living on another planet. Around here childcare for the first year cost $1750/month (plus some commuting and parking costs), which is $21,000, not $4,500.

1750 a month!! Jeebus! :( :( I knew it was expensive in Boston...but...wow. Things are expensive here as well but, I don't think they are nearly that much. I have no clue how much it cost here...but I think I could say it would be pricey. Cost for even the bare necessities in AK can be expensive sometimes :( But, 21k...*shudder.* Thanks for sharing but, man I feel bad for you man :(
 
2008-02-29 12:31:50 PM  
IdBeCrazyIf: HAH... you'll think that diapers are pennies compared to farking formula. I thanked the heathen gods the day my crotch spawn went to whole milk.

Don't the babies sort of come from the 'factory' drinking whole milk? I thought that was the whole "mammal" thing.

/A fark Baby thread without breast milk vs formula?
//What about circumcision?
 
2008-02-29 12:33:06 PM  
+1 on headline.

/poop jokes ftw
 
2008-02-29 12:35:15 PM  
Devilbunee
The sprayer I built and added to the toilet line = no fecal matter in the washing machine. At least no more than normal. I know you can buy them premade, but it's so much cheaper to build one yourself.

You know who else liked to crap in their washing machines...?

img267.imageshack.us
 
2008-02-29 12:43:05 PM  
Green is the new brown?
 
2008-02-29 12:49:10 PM  
Polar Bear Cub: 1750 a month!! Jeebus! :( :( I knew it was expensive in Boston...but...wow. Things are expensive here as well but, I don't think they are nearly that much. I have no clue how much it cost here...but I think I could say it would be pricey. Cost for even the bare necessities in AK can be expensive sometimes :( But, 21k...*shudder.* Thanks for sharing but, man I feel bad for you man :

This is why Nannies are becoming very popular. You can have a Filipino nanny for around $9.75/hr + room and board. Once you have 2 kids it's a no brainer. Plus they clean the house and cook your food. I'm thinking of getting one and I have no kids !

/sick of cleaning the damn house and making dinner
 
2008-02-29 12:50:19 PM  
HAHA!_You_cannot_kill_a_Hindu!: My parents used cloth diapers on me.
Apparently someone managed to pin the diaper TO me when I was a baby. They couldn't figure out why I was crying for a few minutes.



our parents must have taken the same childbirth/infant care classes.


/refused to use cloth diapers on my son.
 
2008-02-29 12:50:34 PM  
Polar Bear Cub: Linoleum_Blownapart: From your link: "If you go back to work right away, childcare can cost as much as $3,000-$4,500 in your baby's first year, not to mention the higher insurance premium for adding an additional person..." I must be living on another planet. Around here childcare for the first year cost $1750/month (plus some commuting and parking costs), which is $21,000, not $4,500.

1750 a month!! Jeebus! :( :( I knew it was expensive in Boston...but...wow. Things are expensive here as well but, I don't think they are nearly that much. I have no clue how much it cost here...but I think I could say it would be pricey. Cost for even the bare necessities in AK can be expensive sometimes :( But, 21k...*shudder.* Thanks for sharing but, man I feel bad for you man :(


It was a shock to me as well - that's my mortgage payment over again. Part of that is that there's a real price premium for newborns/infants. It drops when they hit toddler, and again when they're out of diapers. We also went for the big corporate daycare, but missed out on the corporate discounts. If the daycare were the one associated with my employer it would have been $1400/month.

The low-end of that estimate still sounds like fantasy. $3,000 for the first year - even assuming that you're home the first three months, that's $333/month or $80/week for a newborn. Around here a caretaker is required for every 2 or 3 babies in the room, with a minimum of 2 caretakers on duty. So call it 5 babies for two workers or ... $333 x 5 / 2 = $832/month. Can you hire someone full-time for that little where you live?
 
2008-02-29 12:52:17 PM  
paquerette: It's no worse than washing your underwear in the washing machine.

I rarely if ever shiat in my underwear. Sure there are some days when me and Jack D. have a good time and I pass out for an afternoon after eating a lot of taco bell. Few and far between. Few and far.
 
2008-02-29 12:54:45 PM  
No diaper service here. My wife and I bought the cloth diapers and diaper-covers and it worked just fine. There are times when it ain't pretty, but it's not big deal.
As for poop... we used flushable liners for the diapers. You kid poops, you take of the diaper, plop the poop and that liner into the toilet and flush it. Ta Da!
Made potty training easy and early for us, too.
 
2008-02-29 12:57:45 PM  
netcentric: they found that the resources to wash them took was as detrimental to the environment. The clorine, water use, electricity. Or gas used by companies to drop and pic up.

It's called a washboard, look it up.
Saving the environment is great, as long as it doesn't take any work whatsoever to do it. Nice.
 
2008-02-29 12:58:23 PM  
darkscout: IdBeCrazyIf: HAH... you'll think that diapers are pennies compared to farking formula. I thanked the heathen gods the day my crotch spawn went to whole milk.

Don't the babies sort of come from the 'factory' drinking whole milk? I thought that was the whole "mammal" thing.

/A fark Baby thread without breast milk vs formula?
//What about circumcision?


Some kids are actually alergic to milk... we would have called them dead in the past. But now they make overpriced formula.
 
2008-02-29 12:59:33 PM  
allergic that is.
 
2008-02-29 01:00:20 PM  
Poop is a hazardous waste. Disposable diapers end up in landfills. So if you are using disposable diapers, you ware putting hazardous waste into a landfill. Unless they recycle and make park benches out of them.
 
2008-02-29 01:02:19 PM  
swaxhog:

This is why Nannies are becoming very popular. You can have a Filipino nanny for around $9.75/hr + room and board. Once you have 2 kids it's a no brainer. Plus they clean the house and cook your food. I'm thinking of getting one and I have no kids !

/sick of cleaning the damn house and making dinner


I'll take one too. Assuming she is 18-25. Not just Filipino, eastern euro, or latin american would be just fine.
 
2008-02-29 01:03:43 PM  
I love how they compare paper diapers to cloth and say "Hey, cloth is worse because of blah blah blah..." but never is it mentioned the cost in energy/emissions/pollution the PAPER COMPANY uses and coughs out to make the damn disposable diapers.
Idiots.
So many people here posting about why cloth is a bad idea and they either a) haven't had kids or b) used it for one week or c) refuse to even learn about the many types of cloth diapers, disposable inserts, and diaper covers there are.
Most cloth diapers today use either velcro or snaps, are adjustable in size to they work for a good range in age and size of kid, and are easy to maintain. It's simple.

And the load of laundry isn't huge. We do a load every couple of days. Compare that with the inordinate amount of everyday-laundry we have, the increased laundry is hardly noticeable.

Good grief.
 
2008-02-29 01:09:51 PM  
I cannot think of a more annoying word than "sposies"

/honestly, people
 
2008-02-29 01:13:57 PM  
cubsfan07re:pic


they don't know how to use the three seashells. hehehe


/this is a long damn poop thread.
 
2008-02-29 01:14:33 PM  
http://www.mother-ease.com/

Those worked great for us. There are others, obviously, but we liked the Mother-ease diapers.
 
2008-02-29 01:19:20 PM  
Rik01:

I've not changed any diapers in years, but I recall my Mom having that darn diaper pail reeking in the bathroom for my younger siblings. I also recall the mess and hassle of changing a fully loaded diaper, fiddling with those safety pins and getting poked trying not to poke the wiggling baby


Things have changed in the last 50 years - no more safety pins on the cloth diapers, just velcro or snaps - absolutely no danger to the kid. As far as the environmental cost of doing cloth diapers - I would imagine (as ColdPack referred to above) that the energy and resources used in making, packaging, marketing, and trasporting disposbile diapers on an industrial scale far outweighs me doing a few extra loads of laundry a week.

/two kids, using cloth mostly, some disposible

//poo stinks, no matter if it's wrapped in plastic or cloth.
 
2008-02-29 01:20:57 PM  
Cloth diapers work pretty well, we use them at the Center i work at. You do not get a washer full of baby poop, you rinse them in the toilet first. Really it takes about 2mins to rinse a poop diaper. Our wash has a sanitary cycle in it, so we only have to run them once too. I would recommend if you do use cloth diapers to get some rubber gloves tho, no baby poop on your hands that way, big yellow dish gloves would work too and you dont have to toss em afterwards.

// when and if i ever have kids i plan on disposable diapers. Not because they are green, but because the chemicals in disposable diapers are not so good for a babies tender bits.
 
2008-02-29 01:23:48 PM  
it's not green. it's more of a mustard color:
img253.imageshack.us
 
2008-02-29 01:25:24 PM  
we just need cars that run on used disposable diapers.
 
2008-02-29 01:30:33 PM  
We use cloth and it's so not the big deal that some people make it out to be. We've used disposables when we travel (mostly to use up the disposables we got at our shower), and to be honest, we have had FAR fewer blow-outs in cloth than we have in disposables. Actually, I think in her two months of life, she's pooped out of her cloth three times. We had three poop-outs in three different brands of disposables in one weekend (yes, we're using them correctly!).

Because I'm cheap, I've also started using cloth wipes. We got a ton of flannel receiving blankets, so I cut them up into squares and serged the edges. They work great, too!

Also, there are flushable diaper liners you can use that will contain the poo, so you don't have to scrape it off of the diaper. You can either buy the ones they sell as diaper liners, or cut a paper towel roll in half and use those as diaper liners.

And while I realize that I won't change many minds, this shows the cost savings over time of using cloth vs. disposable. We do laundry with vinegar and baking soda (yes, I'm a freakin' granola cheap-ass, got a problem with that?) so we don't have to factor in as much for detergent costs.


/just sat down to computer after putting load of diapers in the dryer
 
2008-02-29 01:33:53 PM  
We have gDiapers, which have a disposable liner. You just have the cloth outside and put the liner in, which is like a pad. When it's full, you just put it in the toilet and flush. They even provide you with a poop swizzle stick so you can swish it around the commode if it doesn't flush.
 
2008-02-29 01:34:21 PM  
dbaggins: we just need cars that run on used disposable diapers.

many dogs prefer them to dry dog food.

/reverse fur ball
 
2008-02-29 01:35:31 PM  
Linoleum_Blownapart:
It was a shock to me as well - that's my mortgage payment over again. Part of that is that there's a real price premium for newborns/infants. It drops when they hit toddler, and again when they're out of diapers. We also went for the big corporate daycare, but missed out on the corporate discounts. If the daycare were the one associated with my employer it would have been $1400/month.


Would it be cheaper maybe for someone to stay home? I'm just amazed at how much it's costing you :( I hope you don't mind but, I've shown this link to a few friends and we are discussing it now. Perhaps little things like cloth diapers, homemade baby food instead of baby food (my mother simply put adult food in the blender and gave it to us :)etc. may help. A little here and there? I'm not assuming you need to save money or anything but, it cant hurt :)

The low-end of that estimate still sounds like fantasy. $3,000 for the first year - even assuming that you're home the first three months, that's $333/month or $80/week for a newborn. Around here a caretaker is required for every 2 or 3 babies in the room, with a minimum of 2 caretakers on duty. So call it 5 babies for two workers or ... $333 x 5 / 2 = $832/month. Can you hire someone full-time for that little where you live?

I don't think so but, again I have no children. I'm thinking probably not since cost of living here can is high :( Many people here get paid fairly well but, it works out differently because things here are expensive. I'm talking to some friends of mine now (google talk) and asking them about it since they have kids. Many of them looked into day-care and couldn't afford it so we really never discussed it.
 
2008-02-29 01:37:11 PM  
Potty train it and stop using diapers all together. You never touch the "Movements" and the baby will not get a rash.

http://www.diaperfreebaby.org (new window)

//using disposable on mine
 
2008-02-29 01:46:40 PM  
So if you are using disposable diapers, you ware putting hazardous waste into a landfill.

Yeah, and every time you poop you are flushing hazardous into the water system. And every time you smell a fart, molecules of hazardous waste that were in someone's butt are now in your nose.
 
2008-02-29 01:48:40 PM  
Have you guys ever heard of those parents who practice "elimination communication"? Basically the parent can tell when the baby has to piss or shiat and then hangs their baby butt over a toilet or a bush and lets 'em go for it.

I saw it on a Biography special about attachment parenting. If the woman in the article wants to be eco friendly she might as well go all the way. Though, I don't find it very friendly to step on baby shiat. Maybe babies have something in them that makes the flowers grow?

Anyway, heres a link about the diaper-free baby ... Link (new window)
 
2008-02-29 01:49:17 PM  
chriscapoccia: it's not green. it's more of a mustard color:

I just threw up in my mouth a little.

Great Zombie Jeebus, am I glad I don't have children.
 
2008-02-29 01:52:05 PM  
Polar Bear Cub: Would it be cheaper maybe for someone to stay home? I'm just amazed at how much it's costing you :( I hope you don't mind but, I've shown this link to a few friends and we are discussing it now. Perhaps little things like cloth diapers, homemade baby food instead of baby food (my mother simply put adult food in the blender and gave it to us :)etc. may help. A little here and there? I'm not assuming you need to save money or anything but, it cant hurt :)

We do cloth diapers, we really don't eat out, and our daughter eats what we eat, though she gets a lot more fruit than we do. She likes fruit. It made financial sense for my wife to continue working for the first kid, on the assumption that if there are more she should be home when her presence can benefit both or all of them, instead of being home for the first and going back to work for the next.

That being said, our next is due in July, so I'm not sure what we'll be doing in the fall. Doubling that $1750/month doesn't make financial sense immediately, but it's a bit of a toss-up which will hurt more long term, interrupting my wife's career until the kids go to elementary or maintaining retirement and long-term savings deposits for that same span.

don't think so but, again I have no children. I'm thinking probably not since cost of living here can is high :( Many people here get paid fairly well but, it works out differently because things here are expensive. I'm talking to some friends of mine now (google talk) and asking them about it since they have kids. Many of them looked into day-care and couldn't afford it so we really never discussed it.

Ooh, Alaska. My wife has geology degrees. Maybe we should move there for a while.
 
2008-02-29 01:54:47 PM  
Have you guys ever heard of those parents who practice "elimination communication"?

It's fine if you want to be with the baby for 24 hours a day observing its behavior and training it.

Not everybody can do that.
 
2008-02-29 02:00:04 PM  
Approves:
cache.jalopnik.com
 
2008-02-29 02:00:48 PM  
If it's green, mommy is probably eating something weird.
 
2008-02-29 02:03:44 PM  
Polar Bear Cub: jbensley: I don't agree with Polar Bear Club's math either....

Again, see above. How about sending your corrected "math calculations" to them neh? Thank you all for pointing out the failings of math on a baby website where the information was gathered in the first place :) I certainly learned my lesson. Sweet Jeebus.

Website used


Nope, their math is fine. You just can't read. ;)
 
2008-02-29 02:03:51 PM  
It is only green for the first two days or so.

Then it is browny and stinks.

Thank GOD that era is passed for me.

Changing diapers is no thrill.
 
2008-02-29 02:05:11 PM  
..oh another point. Diapers go into the "green" bin up here in Toronto.

Next years soil is this weeks crap.
 
2008-02-29 02:06:21 PM  
lukelightning: Have you guys ever heard of those parents who practice "elimination communication"?

It's fine if you want to be with the baby for 24 hours a day observing its behavior and training it.

Not everybody can do that.


No, I think it's crazy. Most people have to have a double income to make it anyway (and even then). I was just putting a new spin on the cloth vs. disposable diaper debate.

Plus, who wants to spend 24/7 with their kids?
 
2008-02-29 02:09:30 PM  
Haven't even read the thread yet, but I just came in here to APPLAUD subby's headline.

Bravo! BRILLIANT pun.

/3 kids
//too many "green movements"
 
2008-02-29 02:21:15 PM  
RandomFeature: You should use cloth litter then, and save the environment from the evils of cat litter.

Clumping cat litter is clay so basically it's just dirt. And pee and poop. All natural!
 
2008-02-29 02:23:11 PM  
Prank Call of Cthulhu: Like boxes of shiat in your house? Get a cat.
Like washers fulled with shiat? Have a baby.
Like a yard full of shiat? Get a dog.
It's all shiat, people.


With cats, you get a litter robot. It dumps the shiat into a baggy. Best invention evar.

I am a cat elimination/cleaning expert, thanks to my crazy cat lady wife. Ask me anything.
 
2008-02-29 02:37:03 PM  
Jument: I am a cat elimination/cleaning expert, thanks to my crazy cat lady wife. Ask me anything.

I AM the crazy cat lady, so thanks, but I'm good.
 
2008-02-29 02:40:17 PM  
GungFu: Cloth diapers makes you more intelligent?

No. They make you better than everyone else, you ignorant Neocon racits.

/nuke the whales
 
2008-02-29 02:42:34 PM  
This is where it's at

www.gdiapers.com

We use them at night, and regular cloth diapers during the day. The trick for us was that we started using cloth right when our daughter was born, so it doesn't seem at all like an inconvenience. Also she gets a horrendous rash from disposables.
 
2008-02-29 02:49:29 PM  
rob.d: It is only green for the first two days or so.

Then it is browny and stinks.

Thank GOD that era is passed for me.

Changing diapers is no thrill.


I used cloth on all 4 of mine and I loved changing diapers.
Could be you were doing it wrong.
 
2008-02-29 02:55:26 PM  
electronsexparty: lukelightning: Have you guys ever heard of those parents who practice "elimination communication"?

It's fine if you want to be with the baby for 24 hours a day observing its behavior and training it.

Not everybody can do that.

No, I think it's crazy. Most people have to have a double income to make it anyway (and even then). I was just putting a new spin on the cloth vs. disposable diaper debate.

Plus, who wants to spend 24/7 with their kids?


Ah, Parents that really want kids

//spends 24/7 with my snowflakes, home schools a couple, 14 year in college
 
2008-02-29 02:59:23 PM  
Why, oh why do people have kids?


26/m
 
2008-02-29 03:00:58 PM  
I go through about 5 for our 11 month boy. I think time is more valuable and worth more than the effort to preclean then clean the cloth diapers (and I don't have a washing machine in our apartment so there's just no way).

I am a coupon king and I usually end up paying no more than $5 for 36 pampers diapers, which last a week. 4 weeks a month means I pay $20 for diapers a month which is WAY less than $75 a month just for the cleaning of the diapers. My cheapest pampers was $3.5 for 36 and I bought them out!!!!!!
 
2008-02-29 03:03:41 PM  
electronsexparty:
No, I think it's crazy. Most people have to have a double income to make it anyway (and even then). I was just putting a new spin on the cloth vs. disposable diaper debate.

Plus, who wants to spend 24/7 with their kids?


Holy crap, scale back your life man. You don't need the Hummer, the summer house, and the 48 ft yacht.

If you live in Boston, NYC, or LA, you might need a second income, but otherwise you probably won't.

My wife quit her job to watch our kids. With the cost of day care, driving to and from daycare, driving to work, insurance for the car, cost of formula, etc. we figured it would have equated to one of us working full time to pay for all the extra headaches involved.
So we halved our income, have no worries about crack smoking, abusive, coke snorting, anal probing, babysitting/daycare freaks. We have less car debt and only really sacrificed one meal out a week, which we probably wouldn't have taken, now that we have two kids.
 
2008-02-29 03:12:34 PM  
And this is why we have a market economy in which people have choice. Choice to buy product a or b, even if both provide a similar function.

There is no 'wrong' choice. Just personal preference.
 
2008-02-29 03:14:34 PM  
I use cloth on my thirteen month old son. I have since he was 6 months old. I put about $250 into it, and haven't bought diapers since.

Frankly, the extra two loads of laundry a week isn't a big deal. We have a little sprayer for the bathroom so we can rinse the poop off, then it just goes into the pail until wash day.

He prefers them too. I had him in disposables for a couple weeks (leftovers from what my mother uses at her house) because I was moving, and he kept tearing at them and crying. They gave him a horrible rash too.

I went with cloth for the financial aspect. My son wears size 4 disposables now. I would get about 50 to a pack - enough for ten days. $12.99 for the cheapest packs puts me at about $40 for the month. At $1 for a wash load in my building, I spend about $10 a month washing them and let them air dry once clean.

Cleaning isn't hard either. Hot wash, hot rinse with some vinegar and All Free & Clear. Problem solved.

It's been seven months, and we've had some pretty messy poops in that time, but the cloth holds it a lot better.

Cloth started getting really popular years ago - there's even diaper trading websites.

Check out diaperswappers.com and diapertraders.com - there's a pretty big community out there.
 
2008-02-29 03:24:29 PM  
MidnightSkulker: I went with cloth for the financial aspect. My son wears size 4 disposables now. I would get about 50 to a pack - enough for ten days. $12.99 for the cheapest packs puts me at about $40 for the month. At $1 for a wash load in my building, I spend about $10 a month washing them and let them air dry once clean.

I'd hate to use the machine after you.
 
2008-02-29 03:25:04 PM  
Linoleum_Blownapart:
Also shouldn't you be potty training? We are. She's fascinated with her potty and insists on spending a few minutes sitting on it when she's had a diaper removed. She does the wiping and the flushing, and the one time she succeeded in peeing it scared her so much she stood up and ran down the hall, whizzing away.

That made me chuckle!

I'm 6mo pregnant and thanks to this thread, more undecided than ever with the diaper debate. Ah well.. 3 more months to consider the pros and cons...
 
2008-02-29 03:28:58 PM  
minoridiot
We found ours listed under linen services, such as the folks who clean the linens for restaurants.

Thanks for the tip.

On the other hand: There goes my appetite.
 
2008-02-29 03:32:35 PM  
IdBeCrazyIf: Polar Bear Cub: "ONLY." Perhaps that phrase applies to you my friend. But, that seems like a hell of alot to me :)

HAH... you'll think that diapers are pennies compared to farking formula. I thanked the heathen gods the day my crotch spawn went to whole milk.

..and the website noted that it was 8k to 11k for (diapers, formula, etc..) ie everything a baby needs


I am breastfeeding my son (at 13 months). He still barely drinks cows milk and has never had formula. Cloth diapers and breastfeeding were primarily financial choices - especially since my son is sensitive to casein and has GERD, so he would need special formulas. I figure that between breastfeeding and cloth diapering, I've saved around $8,000+ in the past 13 months when accounting for the expensive 'picky' formulas. When you consider my family's income is below $35k for the year, it's a damned good thing I made those choices. 25% of our income just to feed the kid and have something for him to crap in? I think not.
 
2008-02-29 03:33:40 PM  
bea_arthur: Linoleum_Blownapart:
Also shouldn't you be potty training? We are. She's fascinated with her potty and insists on spending a few minutes sitting on it when she's had a diaper removed. She does the wiping and the flushing, and the one time she succeeded in peeing it scared her so much she stood up and ran down the hall, whizzing away.

That made me chuckle!

I'm 6mo pregnant and thanks to this thread, more undecided than ever with the diaper debate. Ah well.. 3 more months to consider the pros and cons...


Duct tape and a plastic shopping bag. Really, they rinse out so easy and they're recyclable. Everybody wins!
 
2008-02-29 03:35:15 PM  
I had to use cloth diapers with my first son after he got a really bad diaper rash that turned yeasty. They created more of a mess than the cloth actually contained. Urine usually got all over the floor, all over my son, who is now crying because he's covered in piss. I kept the diapers as spit up rags but that's all they're good for.
 
2008-02-29 03:39:08 PM  
skankboy: MidnightSkulker: I went with cloth for the financial aspect. My son wears size 4 disposables now. I would get about 50 to a pack - enough for ten days. $12.99 for the cheapest packs puts me at about $40 for the month. At $1 for a wash load in my building, I spend about $10 a month washing them and let them air dry once clean.

I'd hate to use the machine after you.


Babies shiat on their clothes. When they occasionally get their diapers off (as my son has taken to doing - I've started using snap-on covers so he can't get them off as easily) the poop gets all over their bedding. Any building that has a baby in it has crap going into the machines anyway whether or not the parents cloth diaper their kid. At least I am comfortable enough rinsing poop off of things that I rinse anything poopy - clothing, diapers, bedding, etc. - before putting it in the machine.

I run the diapers first load. Then whites, with baking soda in the wash and vinegar in the first rinse cycle. No poop ever makes it into the machine anyway - it is rinsed off into the toilet first.

Cloth diapering is pretty common where I live, so people don't seem to care. There's garbage limits here, so many families choose it so that they aren't throwing out 20lbs or more of diapers a week.

Besides, it's not the poop on the diapers you should be worried about. It's the cloth menstrual pads I use that gross more people out.
 
2008-02-29 03:43:16 PM  
Bobolina: I had to use cloth diapers with my first son after he got a really bad diaper rash that turned yeasty. They created more of a mess than the cloth actually contained. Urine usually got all over the floor, all over my son, who is now crying because he's covered in piss. I kept the diapers as spit up rags but that's all they're good for.

It seems everyone who had a problem with using cloth diapers has either:
a) Used zinc-oxide containing diaper creams without a fleece liner - they coat the inside of the diaper, making it repel moisture (hence the liner)
b) Used fabric softener, which does the same thing and makes them useless without being stripped (multiple washings in boiling water to remove buildup)
c) Used crappy gerber prefolds from wal-mart which are generally known as 'Gerber Garbage.' They are only useful as spitup rags.
d) Never been introduced to FuzziBunz, Bumgenius, Happy Heineys, or the variety of mom-made cloth diapers out there like Goodmamas, Muttequins, HomemadeMama, and Sweetcheeks diapers.

There's a lot more out there than prefolds and vinyl pants.
 
2008-02-29 03:45:29 PM  
FunkOut: 30 years ago my hippie parents had me raised using only cloth diapers. I have a fear of diaper pins and being poked in the hip to this day.

You don't use safety pins anymore, there are plastic clasp thingies now.

/ has twins = 20 diapers a day, screw the environment, I just want some sleep and washing diapers does not equal more sleep
 
2008-02-29 03:49:20 PM  
electronsexparty: co felectronsexparty: Have you guys ever heard of those parents who practice "elimination communication"? Basically the parent can tell when the baby has to piss or shiat and then hangs their baby butt over a toilet or a bush and lets 'em go for it.

Actually, they have little itty bitty potties for that. My cousin does it. I'm amazed when she can tell he's about to pee...

He's walking now, so he actually goes to his potty on his own to use it, so I guess you could say he's now potty trained at 15 months, though she does prompt him sometimes when she can tell he's due for a poop.

I figure I'm either cleaning the potty or the diapers.... The diapers are cuter.
 
2008-02-29 03:50:59 PM  
aladywhoknows: We do it. Diapers have changed. It isn't hard and I am glad we gave it a try.


Also, what most people who use disposables don't know is that you are supposed to scrape the shiat off of the diaper before putting it the trash anyway. Read the package.


Apparently it's ILLEGAL to put human feces in the trash, so yes, you are SUPPOSED to scrape the poo into the toilet before tossing the disposable.

I don't think anyone in the entire History of the Earth since Time Began(tm) has ever scrapped off a disposable diaper.
 
2008-02-29 03:54:50 PM  
MidnightSkulker:

Cloth diapering is pretty common where I live, so people don't seem to care. There's garbage limits here, so many families choose it so that they aren't throwing out 20lbs or more of diapers a week.

Besides, it's not the poop on the diapers you should be worried about. It's the cloth menstrual pads I use that gross more people out.


Mission accomplished
 
2008-02-29 03:57:05 PM  
Cabrini Green: I cannot think of a more annoying word than "sposies"

/honestly, people


Hate to use the cliche, but THIS.

MidnightSkulker: It's the cloth menstrual pads I use that gross more people out.

First, gross. Second, what the fark?
 
2008-02-29 04:00:54 PM  
Polar Bear Cub: Green movement my arse. With gas prices, food costs, debt issues, foreclosures etc. etc people are simply trying to save money. I'm sure there are some out there for doing this for the environment but, me-thinks most are trying to save money and thats just as noble IMHO.

A newborn uses approx. 8-12 diapers per day which is approx $9,000-$11,000 for one year.
FTA: Austin Baby offers a diaper cleaning service that costs around $75 a month...about 900.00 a year.

I think the decision is an easy one.


At 12 diapers a day, that's 4380 diapers a year. $9000/4380 = $2.05 per diaper.

On the other hand, if you use Costco diapers at 17 cents per diaper. .17 * 4380 = $744 per year.

I don't know what kind of gold and diamond diapers you use, but I suggest you stop.
 
2008-02-29 04:04:41 PM  
Bobolina: I had to use cloth diapers with my first son after he got a really bad diaper rash that turned yeasty. They created more of a mess than the cloth actually contained. Urine usually got all over the floor, all over my son, who is now crying because he's covered in piss. I kept the diapers as spit up rags but that's all they're good for.

Definitely sounds like user error. In 2 years of cloth diapering the only times we had leaks/blow outs were when we messed up. and a snap came undone or something.

See MidnightSkulker's post she pretty much sums it up.
 
2008-02-29 04:07:13 PM  
bea_arthur: Linoleum_Blownapart:
Also shouldn't you be potty training? We are. She's fascinated with her potty and insists on spending a few minutes sitting on it when she's had a diaper removed. She does the wiping and the flushing, and the one time she succeeded in peeing it scared her so much she stood up and ran down the hall, whizzing away.

That made me chuckle!

I'm 6mo pregnant and thanks to this thread, more undecided than ever with the diaper debate. Ah well.. 3 more months to consider the pros and cons...


It's easy really. Start with cloth diapers, then after one month, go to Costco/Price Club and buy disposables, or use diapers.com

You will be so sleep deprived in the first 3 months that you will forget about all financial or environmental concerns and make the decision based on the following question;

How can I get more sleep? a) Change a disposable diaper and toss the used one in the garbage b) Scrape the poo off a cloth diaper, then put it in the stink hamper, then when you can't stand it anymore, prewash, then bleach wash and dry the diapers every other day so you have 10 diapers a day for use.

Once you figure out the answer to that question, you will know what to do.
 
2008-02-29 04:07:30 PM  
Plate of Crazy:
MidnightSkulker: It's the cloth menstrual pads I use that gross more people out.

First, gross. Second, what the fark?


Paper pads are really uncomfortable for me. Tampons too, ever since giving birth (too tight). I actually get pretty severe rashes and burns from disposable pads, due to my sensitive skin, that leave me walking weird for a week or so after my period. This also means less sex for the husband, so he was thrilled that I switched to cloth. I believe it may be the absorption chemicals in the pads, or the bleaching of the paper, but I have a pretty bad contact allergy to them. I use mostly hemp or bamboo velour cloth pads, with some unbleached cotton and organic flannel ones. They are infinitely more comfortable, and do not give me painful burns.

I just stick them in a little (dry) container once soiled, soak them overnight, drain, then toss them in with the diapers on wash day.

Most women who use them find that their periods get lighter and their cramps go away. I didn't find that, but mostly because I never had cramps and my periods are only 3-4 days as it is.

I have not yet got up the guts to use the Diva Cup.
 
2008-02-29 04:07:49 PM  
MidnightSkulker: Besides, it's not the poop on the diapers you should be worried about. It's the cloth menstrual pads I use that gross more people out.

I'm sewing up some of those this weekend! Finally taking the plunge... though with breast feeding, Lord knows when I'll need 'em again.
 
2008-02-29 04:09:21 PM  
bea_arthur:
I'm 6mo pregnant and thanks to this thread, more undecided than ever with the diaper debate. Ah well.. 3 more months to consider the pros and cons...


Try G-diapers (new window), They are a great concept, and I would have started on them, if we didn't live below street level, and therefore have to pump our sewage uphill (which means you can't put just anything in the toilet, you have to be real selective so the pump doesn't get clogged up). They seem like a great compromise between cloth and disposable, and they come with a fo-shizzle stick. It's like a magic wand for poo.
 
2008-02-29 04:13:33 PM  
T. Dawg: MidnightSkulker: Besides, it's not the poop on the diapers you should be worried about. It's the cloth menstrual pads I use that gross more people out.

I'm sewing up some of those this weekend! Finally taking the plunge... though with breast feeding, Lord knows when I'll need 'em again.


I hope you have longer than I did. Mine returned at 6 months postpartum (miscarriage, actually, but I had regular periods after that). I know women who have gotten theirs back less than 10 weeks after giving birth. Ugh. I can't imagine dealing with PMS and a newborn at the same time. Recipe for disaster.

Check out newmoonpads.com - I started with some of hers, and though they are kind of in the back of my stash (I have like 50 - most of which I've made myself) I do so love hers. There's also a great pattern on tinybirdorganics.com which I've used.

Invest in oxyclean. A tiny scoop in the overnight soak and I've not had a stain in 7 months of use. They still look new. :)
 
2008-02-29 04:14:13 PM  
congratulations to all you breastfeeders.
Breast fed is best fed!

Also, as to you alternative menstrual products types (new window)out there, eww.

/although I had a friend who had special rubber pants for her period. Which seemed way grosser than any of these solutions.
 
2008-02-29 04:15:08 PM  
Mayhem of the Black Underclass: bea_arthur:
I'm 6mo pregnant and thanks to this thread, more undecided than ever with the diaper debate. Ah well.. 3 more months to consider the pros and cons...

Try G-diapers (new window), They are a great concept, and I would have started on them, if we didn't live below street level, and therefore have to pump our sewage uphill (which means you can't put just anything in the toilet, you have to be real selective so the pump doesn't get clogged up). They seem like a great compromise between cloth and disposable, and they come with a fo-shizzle stick. It's like a magic wand for poo.


Those are seriously expensive. Most people I know gave up on the inserts and just started using prefolds instead. At $30/pack for the large refills (at least at the local place I can buy them) it wasn't something worth doing.

The covers, however, are awesome.
 
2008-02-29 04:17:00 PM  
MidnightSkulker

You are a new Fark hero. At least for me. I was raised by hippy lesbians so cloth diapers, reuseable menstrual pads, all good. You've done a service here.
 
2008-02-29 04:17:21 PM  
Mayhem of the Black Underclass: congratulations to all you breastfeeders.
Breast fed is best fed!

Also, as to you alternative menstrual products types (new window)out there, eww.

/although I had a friend who had special rubber pants for her period. Which seemed way grosser than any of these solutions.


Kind of like Aunt Flo's Unmentionables panties? Though they aren't rubber. Rubber sounds kind of uncomfortable.

I appreciate the eww. Even most of my 'crunchy' friends think they're gross. To each their own. I'd rather not walk like a penguin 10 days out of thirty.
 
2008-02-29 04:20:34 PM  
you_idiot: b) Scrape the poo off a cloth diaper, then put it in the stink hamper, then when you can't stand it anymore, prewash, then bleach wash and dry the diapers every other day so you have 10 diapers a day for use.

We just wash on a hot/hot cycle with high agitation using baking soda in the main wash & vinegar in a Downy ball for the rinse. No stains, no smell, and they come out soft.

Bleach actually degrades the fabric faster.
 
2008-02-29 04:20:45 PM  
Acharne: MidnightSkulker

You are a new Fark hero. At least for me. I was raised by hippy lesbians so cloth diapers, reuseable menstrual pads, all good. You've done a service here.


Glad to be of service. I *am* a hippie. Birkenstocks, peasant tops, sarongs, and love beads included. I just don't do the whole drugs thing. And hey, I'm bisexual. Is that close enough?

Hopefully my son doesn't turn out too abnormal coming from my sexually-liberated, earth-friendly, cheapo, natural parenting. At least I'm not homeschooling him when he gets older - that'd put me right over the top into 'nuts' in most peoples' books.
 
2008-02-29 04:23:45 PM  
Acharne: MidnightSkulker

You are a new Fark hero. At least for me. I was raised by hippy lesbians so cloth diapers, reuseable menstrual pads, all good. You've done a service here.


Here, here! Who knew there were so many of us granola mamas on Fark?
 
2008-02-29 04:25:16 PM  
I just got over the flu so I'm getting a kick out of these shiat jokes.


/also getting a kick out of farting and having only gas come out.
//really.
 
2008-02-29 04:51:04 PM  
T. Dawg: Acharne: MidnightSkulker

You are a new Fark hero. At least for me. I was raised by hippy lesbians so cloth diapers, reuseable menstrual pads, all good. You've done a service here.

Here, here! Who knew there were so many of us granola mamas on Fark?


This is particularly amusing as I am currently eating some yogurt with homemade vanilla granola. It's amazing what you can do with some puffed rice, honey, nuts, and rolled oats.
 
2008-02-29 04:53:47 PM  
I admire those that are successful with the cloth diapers. We weren't. We were hoping there would be a diaper service in the area but, no such thing. We love (LOVE) to hear from hippies or former hippies about how they are only going to feed their kid organics, cloth diapers, all that BS. Ok it's not all BS. But they don't even know why they want to do these things. Then they realize:

A) cloth (and organics) cost a lot. it takes hundreds of dollars to get (good) cloth diapers. Not that you won't spend hundreds on disposables eventually, but most hippies live month-to-month.

B) it is more work to clean cloth diapers. hippies hate work.

So make sure to harass people that say they are going to go cloth, and then don't. Then ask them why and when they say "oh, it was just too much mess" say something like "well I guess some people just don't care enough about the planet". Then peel out in your ginormous SUV.

Disclaimer: my ride gets 60mpg, I applaud environmentalism but you have to know why you are doing it. Diapers I don't think are going to change much. The guys at Huggies make a great product and are more environmentally conscious than any hippies I have come across.
 
2008-02-29 05:17:22 PM  
MidnightSkulker: Plate of Crazy:
MidnightSkulker: It's the cloth menstrual pads I use that gross more people out.

First, gross. Second, what the fark?

Paper pads are really uncomfortable for me. Tampons too, ever since giving birth (too tight). I actually get pretty severe rashes and burns from disposable pads, due to my sensitive skin, that leave me walking weird for a week or so after my period. This also means less sex for the husband, so he was thrilled that I switched to cloth. I believe it may be the absorption chemicals in the pads, or the bleaching of the paper, but I have a pretty bad contact allergy to them. I use mostly hemp or bamboo velour cloth pads, with some unbleached cotton and organic flannel ones. They are infinitely more comfortable, and do not give me painful burns.

I just stick them in a little (dry) container once soiled, soak them overnight, drain, then toss them in with the diapers on wash day.

Most women who use them find that their periods get lighter and their cramps go away. I didn't find that, but mostly because I never had cramps and my periods are only 3-4 days as it is.

I have not yet got up the guts to use the Diva Cup.


Hmm, never knew such existed. I don't really feel the need to use them, but if they work for you, that's good. FWIW, I didn't like Instead. Didn't work for me at all, which is the understatement of the year. The Diva Cup looks like the same concept.
 
2008-02-29 05:43:58 PM  
Any woman who recommends cloth diapers should first try out cloth tampons for a cycle or two.
 
2008-02-29 06:16:48 PM  
The Pho King: This is where it's at www.gdiapers.com

Is there any business Google won't get into?
 
2008-02-29 06:54:31 PM  
JoltCola: Is there any business Google won't get into?

Providing uncensored search results to the People's Republic of China?
 
2008-02-29 07:09:11 PM  
FalinYou just can't read. ;)

Awwww...Thats SO very special :) That has already been talked about at great length. A little late are we? Try taking your own advice and reading the thread first next time ;) Kisses :)

/Jeebus at first this was cute...now its just plain annoying

you_idiot
I don't know what kind of gold and diamond diapers you use, but I suggest you stop.

That comment was at least creative! Well-done :)

Linoleum_Blownapart
Ooh, Alaska. My wife has geology degrees. Maybe we should move there for a while.

You are welcome here anytime my friend :) You should really look into it...seriously. Its one of the most beautiful places in the world IMHO :)
 
2008-02-29 07:29:30 PM  
Cloth diapers require energy to produce. They are typically chemically treated (bleached) before sale. They need to be sterilized after every use. That does not mean washing in a washing machine on cold. That means having your water heater set to 160 degrees or higher, and washing it for an extended cycle. That expends much energy.

Disposables require little energy to make en masse and even less to dispose of. There are a lot more wasteful and prolific polluters than disposable diapers out there for a lot less useful purposes.

It is also an indisputable fact that disposables are better for the overall health of your child in that they do a much better job at keeping the nasties away from your baby due to the better absorbtion and prevent bacterial and yeast infections from taking hold as easily.

Yes, dirty diapers are a pretty gross byproduct of civilization, but in case you haven't noticed the US in particular has no shortage of places to put trash. Hell, new jersey and illinois are already state sized refuse piles.
 
2008-02-29 08:01:19 PM  
2 more months until I join the Green Movement with my baby's Brown Movement!
 
2008-02-29 08:03:05 PM  
tansa

It is also an indisputable fact that disposables are better for the overall health of your child in that they do a much better job at keeping the nasties away from your baby due to the better absorbtion and prevent bacterial and yeast infections from taking hold as easily.

Make up information much, Troll?
I dispute your 'fact', you're full of Soupy Pants. (diaper contents)
Fecal matter is not kept away from the skin by any diaper, disposable or cloth. Bacterial and Yeast infections are caused from parents that don't change the child's diaper as needed and allow the child to sit in it's own waste. Urine does not cause bacterial or yeast infections. Urine is sterile. Diaper rash is a creation of the modern age and does not occur with cloth diapers. Diaper rash is usually a dermatitis from the bleach and chemicals in the paper/plastic of the disposable and the inability for the skin to breath in the disposable. It can also be cause from the friction of rough paper rubbing against tender baby skin.

Cloth diapers are usually not chemically treated with bleach. Vinegar is used.
 
2008-02-29 08:56:18 PM  
"Yes, dirty diapers are a pretty gross byproduct of civilization, but in case you haven't noticed the US in particular has no shortage of places to put trash."

In case YOU haven't noticed, there are garbage islands in the oceans bigger than Texas and growing every day. "Disposing" of a diaper doesn't mean it disappears.
 
2008-02-29 09:04:28 PM  
MidnightSkulker
Plate of Crazy


actually the diva cup is great-used it for over two years now and only two "leaks" in that time. It's thicker than the instead cups and holds more. Before that I used sea pearls menstrual sponges-those didn't leak either. And there is dioxon in all bleached paper which has been linked to endometriosis, which would explain the decrease in bleeding after switching to non-paper products.
 
2008-02-29 09:34:52 PM  
Having 2 *precious snowflakes* in diapers at the same time, using cloth saved me hundreds of dollars... and yes, I kept a heaping pile of disposables out of the landfills in the process. Green movement or not, those fuzzi bunz were one of my best investments.
 
2008-02-29 09:52:53 PM  
Total Thread Count:

Snowflake: 3
Crotchfruit: 0

You're getting better. Stay classy.
 
2008-02-29 10:18:30 PM  
We've used both. Cloth diapers (at least the good ones with 100% cotton and a high thread count) chafe less, and you can just wash and reuse them, so you save a little money. Given, you occasionally have to get your hands a bit poopy, but a little poop never killed anyone.

One of my jobs as a kid was cleaning out the diaper pail. Imagine having to dive your entire upper body into a container lined with ammonia and poop :) Fun fun!
 
2008-02-29 11:25:11 PM  
Just wool, unwoven silk, or cotton?

I did not know that.

Personally, I would be willing to give silk a try, but wool? I don't like wearing wool shirts without a cotton tee underneath. If your've got a boy baby, I'm thinking wool would produce some serious friction loss (shudders). Itchy, itchy, itchy.

No wonder some babies cry all the time.
 
2008-02-29 11:48:36 PM  
I used cloth diapers for both of my kids. They were super easy, and only required a couple of extra loads of laundry per week. I saved the dipes and reused them for the second kid.

They're not a big deal and they don't need to be sterilized, just washed. I had a really good washing routine and actually passed the diapers on to some friends when we were done with them. The dipes made it through 4 kids and still had use left in them.

The dipes that I didn't loan out were sold on ebay (back when ebay would allow selling of cds) and I made almost 75% of purchase price back on the dipes. It was a good deal to me and I don't know if it's at all relational but both kiddos potty learned by 2 years old (one boy, one girl)

I love cloth diapers.
 
2008-03-01 12:18:21 AM  
My wife and I went cloth. It was more of an economical decision. Couple sets of diapers for a couple kids will save us lots in the long run. AND they have re-sale value.
 
2008-03-01 01:54:06 AM  
http://www.suite101.com/article.cfm/infant_potty_training/49208

Turns out it's not just crazy hippies who avoid diapers altogether.

Huh.

/crazy hippie myself
//still no intention of reproducing
///fascinated nonetheless
////slashies!!!!!
 
2008-03-01 06:55:12 AM  
my son wears disposables but is still part of the green movement media3.dropshots.com
 
2008-03-01 08:06:39 AM  
BlaqueKatt: MidnightSkulker
Plate of Crazy

actually the diva cup is great-used it for over two years now and only two "leaks" in that time. It's thicker than the instead cups and holds more. Before that I used sea pearls menstrual sponges-those didn't leak either. And there is dioxon in all bleached paper which has been linked to endometriosis, which would explain the decrease in bleeding after switching to non-paper products.


Oh I know that about the Diva Cup. I just haven't got up the guts to use it since, as I said above, I'm a little tighter after giving birth. I don't know which size to go with because of that, and have no desire to blow $30 on one I can't use. I figure it'd be pretty uncomfortable for me. It's definitely not a matter of the blood issue - I'm weird enough that my own blood doesn't bug me. Frankly, I don't think anything coming out of my uterus could freak me out now.
 
2008-03-01 08:10:45 AM  
CowboyUpCowgirlDown: Just wool, unwoven silk, or cotton?

I did not know that.

Personally, I would be willing to give silk a try, but wool? I don't like wearing wool shirts without a cotton tee underneath. If your've got a boy baby, I'm thinking wool would produce some serious friction loss (shudders). Itchy, itchy, itchy.

No wonder some babies cry all the time.


Wool is often used over a fitted diaper (diaper-shaped, but has no waterproof layer) because it is naturally antibacterial, and the lanolin makes it feel dry to the touch even when soaked. The wool used for 'longies' (pants that act as a diaper cover), shorties (same thing, but shorts), and soakers (just a cover) is usually blue faced leicester or merino wool. They are VERY soft and not scratchy at all. Equally, keeping it properly lanolized makes it very nice on the skin and actually keep the skin soft. :)

Wool diaper covers only need to be washed every 2-3 weeks (or if they get poopy) because the reaction of the urine and lanolin actually creates a type of natural soap, thus cleaning the wool.

Lots of moms swear by it. It's cute, too. There's awesome longies out there called Crankypants - just google them.
 
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