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(Some Guy)   A guide to words used regularly in journalism that no one ever says in real life   (blogcentral.journallive.co.uk) divider line 150
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25672 clicks; posted to Main » on 22 Feb 2008 at 12:20 PM (6 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2008-02-22 12:38:52 PM  
I thought that list was a bit too snippy. Newspaper headline words are like unique sub-set of language that one understands in the context of reading the article.

...just like pillow talk.
 
2008-02-22 12:39:48 PM  
IXI Jim IXI
jshove1: /there are just so many

I acutally use Die in a Fire quite often...especially at hockey games, when the Bruins are losing.


I use 'still no cure for cancer' a lot, no one ever understands the joke and I just seem to get that 'she's one sick biatch' look from people.
 
2008-02-22 12:40:21 PM  
cHico11: no bollocks?

tvmedia.ign.com
Here you go.
 
2008-02-22 12:41:07 PM  
Wow, british journalists are weird.

/that's all
//Pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconeosis
 
2008-02-22 12:41:08 PM  
I use "lambast" and "fury", but yeah, I never really considered just how seldom the rest of those words are used off of the written page (or computer screen).
 
2008-02-22 12:41:25 PM  
What about "hizzoner"? Or is the NY Post the only paper dumb enough to use that term?

The Toledo Blade newspaper has nicknamed the Mayor "Hizzoner"
 
2008-02-22 12:43:00 PM  
A guide to words regularly used in journalism Britain, that no one ever says in real life.

That would be even better.
 
2008-02-22 12:43:21 PM  
dickbigwood:

The Toledo Blade newspaper has nicknamed the Mayor "Hizzoner"


'Blade' is a great name for a newspaper.
 
2008-02-22 12:43:25 PM  
not really a word more a phrase and stolen at that

nuke it from orbit ... its the only way to be sure
 
2008-02-22 12:43:28 PM  
jshove1: I use 'still no cure for cancer' a lot, no one ever understands the joke and I just seem to get that 'she's one sick biatch' look from people.

I suggested that someone tell their complaining customer to go die in a fire the other day, and you'd think I just ate someone's puppy...

Of course, you have to be careful using that one in Rhode Island these days.
 
2008-02-22 12:43:54 PM  
I like the word "fury". The writer has obviously never been on Fark.

Masturbate furiously.
Hit that with the fury of a thousand angry Gods.
 
2008-02-22 12:47:06 PM  
I use some of these words irregardless.
 
2008-02-22 12:47:13 PM  
As my wife (who works in the newspaper business here in the US) said:

"You know what many of those words have in common? They're short enough for headlines."
 
2008-02-22 12:47:19 PM  
"Motorist" and "pocketbook."
 
2008-02-22 12:48:18 PM  
Whoever wrote that list should be lambasted.

While a good many of those words are very British, even the Soccer related ones are wrong. I used to play sweeper-back, and there would be a Stopper-back 15 yeards in front of me. (For those of you who have no clue about soccer, the defense is usually 3 fullbacks. In a more defense oriented format, there are 4, with the middle fullback replaced with a forward mid fullback or Stopper and a rear mid fullback or Sweeper. The sweeper has the leg that can take the ball downfield in one kick, the stapper has the wind to run all over the backfield.)

Lambast is a great word. It's up there with gobsmacked, absquatulate, and discombobulated. And fracas. Definition of Fracas? Tots, recently fed on sugar, simultaneously spot the same toy. Sort of like a spat, but more physical and less vituperative.

I think the real news here is that most journalists have some higher education. (Unless they work for Fox)

Raiden333: It was as if an occult hand had inserted such odd words into the dictionary.

FTW
 
2008-02-22 12:50:28 PM  
Bungle in the Jungle?
 
2008-02-22 12:50:38 PM  
www.variety.com
 
2008-02-22 12:52:05 PM  
Raiden333: It was as if an occult hand had inserted such odd words into the dictionary.

WIN!
 
2008-02-22 12:52:06 PM  
HellblazerPrime: A guide to words regularly used in journalism Britain, that no one ever says in real life.

That would be even better.


Don't you get it? If you die in Canada, you die in real life!
 
2008-02-22 12:55:04 PM  
My favorite recent Fark word - defenestration
 
2008-02-22 12:55:04 PM  
Fellows: SamTana: FTFY

Not really what I was going for ...

You're also from the UK, so your opinion is biased, wrong and completely uninteresting.


You forgot: "And probably has bad teeth, too."
 
2008-02-22 12:55:05 PM  
Raiden333: perfect
 
2008-02-22 12:55:53 PM  
Begoggle: I use some of these words irregardless.

That word is disorientating.
 
2008-02-22 12:55:56 PM  
The word 'purported' was purportedly missing from this list.


/hates sensational journalism
//just give me the facts and reserve your bullshiat for a novel
 
2008-02-22 12:57:27 PM  
Raiden333: It was as if an occult hand had inserted such odd words into the dictionary.

I react jovially.
 
2008-02-22 12:58:32 PM  
BUNGLE: make a mistake, especially of a council officer.
Oh, I thought it was spelled bung hole.

And suprisingly, irregardless, not on the list. Though their list appears to be more UK, I can see why it is not on the list since irregardless is more American.

I seem to be missing some proper punctuations in my thought patterns.
 
2008-02-22 12:58:50 PM  
"Nix" is a good one when trying to write a 1-column headline in 36-point type about a zoning denial.

Although editors frown upon it.

Frowning editors can be a real pain in the ass.

Like 1-column headlines. About Arnold Schwarzenegger.
 
2008-02-22 12:58:56 PM  
Boffin boffin boffin boffin boffin boffin
Boffin boffin boffin boffin boffin boffin
Boffin boffin boffin boffin boffin boffin
Boffin boffin boffin boffin boffin boffin
Boffin boffin boffin boffin boffin boffin
Boffin boffin boffin boffin boffin boffin
Boffin boffin boffin boffin boffin boffin

BOFFIN
 
2008-02-22 12:59:24 PM  
Spongebob Plaid Pants
My favorite recent Fark word - defenestration

I have thrown a random object out of a window for the sole purpose of getting to use defenestration.

Pioneer420
The word 'purported' was purportedly missing from this list.

How about proported?
/Can't remember how long I thought proported was a word which meant "asserted"
 
2008-02-22 01:00:23 PM  
From MoTY headline above: There's an outstanding warrant for her arrest.

Has there ever been a mediocre warrant mentioned in the newspaper?
 
2008-02-22 01:00:56 PM  
unbiased?
 
2008-02-22 01:04:15 PM  
nubianrdly
 
2008-02-22 01:04:58 PM  
"Boffin"? Does it count when you use it like, "Last night I was boffin' this chick..."?
 
2008-02-22 01:05:04 PM  
theoriginalslash: My favorite Simpsons word is still "craptastic."

I don't know. That one's good, but it's not as good as "Polly-Wolly-Crappy."

/Nelson rules.
/Ha-ha!
 
2008-02-22 01:05:12 PM  
Oh, I thought it was spelled bung hole.

Close!
 
2008-02-22 01:08:11 PM  
bung ho: Oh, I thought it was spelled bung hole.

Close!


But no cigar?
 
2008-02-22 01:08:52 PM  
Mr. Coffee Nerves: My college journalism prof flagged me for using "jailed in lieu of $20,000 bail" in an assignment. He said "that's not a common term in language."

I cut out his crime article from the previous week's local paper using that phrase -- in lieu of the common term, one might say.

He said "My editor did that. It's still wrong."

When I asked him what's right he said "entered into custody after failing to make bail."

I don't think I need to tell you that he was the most boring and fussy professor on campus


FTFY.

/so redundant.
//so wrong.
///pet peeve.

TypoFlyspray: And fracas. Definition of Fracas?

Can you describe the Fracas, sir?
 
2008-02-22 01:10:11 PM  
I think I hear "slammed" and "quizzed" occasionally in real life. I was expecting words like "dangling chad" and "spider hole".

I like "coffers" though. I will use that word next time I talk to my HR person about direct deposit.
 
2008-02-22 01:12:32 PM  
brap: I use all of those but SWINGEING.

But I plan on dropping it into conversation this evening after the wife and our friends have a couple drinks in them.



Aevum: That's ridiculous.
Other than swingeing, which I've never before read in my life, I use those all the damn time.

I slam this article with fury for their bungle and propose we gather revelers to start a fracas with them.



This. Exactly this.

Who wrote this list? Someone never worked their way past middle school?

/Embiggens? I never heard that word before I moved to Springfield.
//I don't know why. It's a perfectly cromulent word.
 
2008-02-22 01:16:14 PM  
i quit reading at footballer.
 
2008-02-22 01:16:36 PM  
Raiden333: It was as if an occult hand had inserted such odd words into the dictionary.

*golf clap*

Very nice reference. Unfortunately I think it's too easy to slip that into Fark threads so probably doesn't get you in the club.
 
2008-02-22 01:18:48 PM  
shubai33: Very nice reference. Unfortunately I think it's too easy to slip that into Fark threads so probably doesn't get you in the club.

Shhhhh. The first rule of the Occult Hand club is that you don't talk about the Occult Hand club.
 
2008-02-22 01:20:59 PM  
cHico11: no bollocks?

Never mind the Bollocks...

photos.contactmusic.com


/Anarchy in the UK
 
2008-02-22 01:29:20 PM  
"Cagers" for basketball players.

Allegedly.

Aftermath.

Arraigned.

Robbery gone bad. (I'm still waiting to do a story about a robbery gone well.)

Clinging to life.

Death toll.

Firestorm.

Gridiron.

Killing spree.

Motorists. (Just use "drivers", kids.)

Slaying/slain. (My first news director told me never to use it unless there's a dragon in the story.)
 
2008-02-22 01:30:47 PM  
BRAVE: someone with a disease.
As in: "Councillor loses brave cancer battle." - East Anglian Daily Times, February 7.
As it would never be said in real life: "My brave boyfriend's battling a cold today."


This one got a nod and a chuckle out of me.
 
2008-02-22 01:35:36 PM  
Bonzo_1116: Boffin boffin boffin boffin boffin boffin
Boffin boffin boffin boffin boffin boffin
Boffin boffin boffin boffin boffin boffin
Boffin boffin boffin boffin boffin boffin
Boffin boffin boffin boffin boffin boffin
Boffin boffin boffin boffin boffin boffin
Boffin boffin boffin boffin boffin boffin


MUSHROOM MUSHROOM
 
2008-02-22 01:35:36 PM  
If some newsmaker appears in public holding a Bible, the papers will invariably say he is "clutching" it.
 
2008-02-22 01:36:08 PM  
Also, tapped.

e.g. "Rice tapped for Secretary of State".

I had no idea the Secretary of State's powers included ordering people to have sex while he watched.
 
2008-02-22 01:37:10 PM  
Incursion

My wife and I led an incursion into our neighbors abode to retreive our stolen cat.
 
2008-02-22 01:38:32 PM  
heh, heres the equivelant of babelfish for us americans to understand that garbage:

http://www.translatebritish.com


/jeez we need a farkin translator to understand them now?!
 
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