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(MSN Money)   Vindication for only having beer and hot sauce in the fridge: Eating out is cheaper than cooking   (articles.moneycentral.msn.com) divider line 566
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21582 clicks; posted to Main » on 15 Feb 2008 at 2:33 PM (6 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2008-02-15 03:58:09 PM  
DaShredda:
4 Boxes of Pasta... $4

2 - 32oz can of plain sauce... $3

Ground Meat, 3 pounds... $ 5

16 meals... $12

you get 'em SHREDDA! testify!1
 
2008-02-15 03:58:10 PM  
Fark_Guy_Rob: DaShredda
My roomate does Cancer research and makes under 30k a year.

I know this might sound cold, but the truth is; people just don't CARE all that much about Cancer, or any of the other 'noble' low-paying jobs. Yes, people with cancer might care A LOT, but they represent a small percentage of the population.

People will 'say' things like a Children's Hospital or Cancer Research is important to them; but when it comes down to it; people don't care *enough* to fork over money. And that is why people like your roommate don't earn a lot of money. Because, to society, it isn't as important as other things.

Consider the average amount an American guy spends on Sports, TV, or Alcohol and compare that to the average amount they donate to cancer, or even - just donate at all.

And that is why an NBA star makes millions while a reall smart dude researching cancer doesn't. Because sports are more important to our society than cancer research.

People might think it is 'wrong' or that cancer should be more important....but it simply isn't.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supply_and_demand


You're basing your argument that more money = more important.

My roomate loves his job.

And it's more important than an NBA star.

Maybe in the world of dick over dick business it doesn't produce money... but who farking cares?
 
2008-02-15 03:58:24 PM  
This story is copyright 2006.

This article is STILL not news. It's Fark.

//I bet this was a greenlight back then too.
//will resubmit this 2010 for my second GL!
 
2008-02-15 03:59:01 PM  
desktopjockey: Katie98_KT: Are you people all incompetent? Eating out is NOT cheaper than cooking. A healthy home cooked meal for 4 should/can cost no more than eating at McDonald's for 1.

And YES, I've done the math and can prove it.

Now, if you add in opportunity costs for someone with a well-paying job, you may be right. But if all you consider is food costs, well, these people has serious math issues.

I call you on your bet. You show me how you can feed two adults, a teenager, and a 10 year old HEALTHILY on $3.16, with a bare cupboard to start, (Mcdonalds for 1 = 1 double cheeseburger ($1), small fries ($1), and small drink ($1) and I will bow to you! That is a meal for me - one of the four you claim to be able to feed for $3.16. I believe you need a new calculator.


I could be a real dick and just say, "a bag of dried beans." The funny thing is that one ingredient would be a healthier and better balanced meal that what you got from McDonalds.
 
2008-02-15 03:59:10 PM  
DaShredda: I feel people like this, your wife included, have severe psychological problems.

How so? How does she have psychological problems that her job has work that she can do at any time?

I did not make one statement about her mental state at all.

Are you crazy? You seem to be reading a lot into something that never was stated.
 
2008-02-15 04:00:23 PM  
DaShredda: desktopjockey: I call you on your bet. You show me how you can feed two adults, a teenager, and a 10 year old HEALTHILY on $3.16, with a bare cupboard to start, (Mcdonalds for 1 = 1 double cheeseburger ($1), small fries ($1), and small drink ($1) and I will bow to you! That is a meal for me - one of the four you claim to be able to feed for $3.16. I believe you need a new calculator.

4 Boxes of Pasta... $4

2 - 32oz can of plain sauce... $3

Ground Meat, 3 pounds... $ 5

16 meals... $12


Neither meal is particularly healthy, what with no dark green leafy vegetables and both relying on processed foods.

It's getting the viggies that's the hard part. My personal preference for a very cheap healthy meal is veggie omlets. Eggs are a health and cheap source of protein. Use frozen veggies and spinach. Add salsa as a topping for flavor.
 
2008-02-15 04:00:34 PM  
FTFA: When I add my hourly rate

Um, fail. Unless you have an unlimited amount of business, this calculation never works. Plus, some of us who don't cook for a living enjoy doing it at home.

Mostly I like making mixed drinks, though, and nuking something out of the freezer to eat with my delicious delicious cocktail.
 
2008-02-15 04:00:35 PM  
that claim is bullsh*t. restaurants sell food for 300% (roughly) more than it costs them to buy. i can buy a pound of ribeye steak for 10 dollars. At a restaurant, a 10 dollar steak is an 8 oz "sizzler" (meaning the shi*tiest cut of meat in the building). another example, spaghetti cost 8-10 dollars at the olive garden. At the store, that could buy 3 boxes of pasta and 2 jars of sauce.

bullsh*t times 1000
 
2008-02-15 04:00:58 PM  
Helios1182:
I could be a real dick and just say, "a bag of dried beans." The funny thing is that one ingredient would be a healthier and better balanced meal that what you got from McDonalds.


BUT BUT BUT IT ISNT TASTY

I AM AMERICAN I CAN HAZ CHEEZEBURGR?
 
2008-02-15 04:01:06 PM  
dwalder: Any or all would mitigate the cost and raise the benefit you'd derive from spending more time at home (assuming you don't live with awful, stupid in-laws like one Farker mentions). You know, home, the place you should probably enjoy, since you're paying for it whether you eat out or not.

What do you not go with your family if you eat out? People spend time together when they eat out.

Usually people spend more time together when they eat out then when they cook at home.

The whole family usually doesn't all cook together.
 
2008-02-15 04:03:09 PM  
Corvus:

My wife's job for example has work for her to do 24/7. She can open her laptop and be working and getting time and half overtme for her work and it is better than 20/hr. So how is that a fictitious statement?

Or am I allowed to explain? If I explain to you why it's true I then get attacked for "bragging"

Sorry I was away for 5 mins I was getting free lunch.

Once again you call it dumb to do it this way but it's a way that many successful people do use.


That is exceedingly rare, not many people are in that position where they could, literally, file billable hours at the drop of a hat (though lawyers come to mind).

The presence of your exception does not disprove the general principle which is that, for most people, computing the "value" of their time is a meaningless activity outside of normal "office hours".
 
2008-02-15 04:03:41 PM  
Corvus
I make more than that. You didn't see the other parts of the conversation.

I would give you a more specific idea of what I make but I have already been told I am bragging by answering questions.


The statement of yours about it not being cost effective to cook because your time is worth $20 dollars an hour; implies that you'd have to give up $20 dollars an hour for each hour you spend cooking.

The next statement of yours that I saw, said you sometimes earn $20 dollars an hour while sleeping. That implies that you earn money without any direct action on your part; which would mean taking time away from your job to cook (like when you sleep) would not cause you to incur any 'cost'.

Bragging or not, that doesn't seem to make sense to me. Either you work all the time and any time you take away from your job is going to cost you your hourly wage($20 or $40, or $60 an hour) or it won't.

So, if you work all the time and can't spare anytime for cooking without not getting paid your hourly wage for those house AND you sometimes get paid while sleeping - the only reasonable explanation is that you sleep on the job; when you aren't supposed to. If you were an 'On-Call' type employee who made some sort of bonus while carrying the 'On-Call-Pager' or something; you could still cook while on call, just as you could sleep.

So yeah - forgive me, but I'm just plain confused.
 
2008-02-15 04:03:58 PM  
This is true for an American diet, but for an ethnic diet its untrue. We all know how much chinese take out cost. Now imagine how much the price dips when you make it at home.

A 25lb bag of rice will cost you 13 bucks tops. This feeds 1 person for several months.
 
2008-02-15 04:04:00 PM  
MuppetPastor:

4 potatoes: $0.50
4 carrots: $0.25
1 onion: $.50
8 oz of cheap beef: $2.00
2 TBSP balsamic vinegar: $0.10
2 TBSP olive oil: $0.01
Salt and Pepper: $0.05
8 oz mushrooms: $1.00


Feeds 4. Total cost: less than $5


Half a pound of beef for four people? I eat that in a meal.

It's just me and my husband, but we go to Costco for the bulk of our food shopping. We eat meats, vegetables and salads most of the time. The freezer is my friend.
 
2008-02-15 04:04:11 PM  
DaShredda:

4 Boxes of Pasta... $4

2 - 32oz can of plain sauce... $3

Ground Meat, 3 pounds... $ 5

16 meals... $12

I dont know your portion sizes, but my teenager alone would eat half that in two meals.
 
2008-02-15 04:04:17 PM  
Corvus:
The whole family usually doesn't all cook together.


if you have a big enough cauldron they do.
 
2008-02-15 04:04:57 PM  
janks369: that claim is bullsh*t. restaurants sell food for 300% (roughly) more than it costs them to buy. i can buy a pound of ribeye steak for 10 dollars. At a restaurant, a 10 dollar steak is an 8 oz "sizzler" (meaning the shi*tiest cut of meat in the building). another example, spaghetti cost 8-10 dollars at the olive garden. At the store, that could buy 3 boxes of pasta and 2 jars of sauce.

bullsh*t times 1000


Plus the quality of the ingredients, even at "good" restaurants is usually middling, at best.

Read Orwell's "Down and Out..." or Bourdain's "Kitchen Confidential" for excellent primers on the restaurant industry.

I couldn't eat out for weeks after getting through those books.
 
2008-02-15 04:05:51 PM  
You guys just don't know what it's like shopping for organic, sustainable growth vegan food. I mean I have to drive 85 miles to the store for anything.
 
2008-02-15 04:06:01 PM  
dwalder: I have tried to survey these 300+ posts (that is a lot!), but I haven't seen the obvious corollary of: time spent with family, time spent preparing a meal helping relieve stress, the pleasure of cooking for other people as well as feeling creative with your diet.
Any or all would mitigate the cost and raise the benefit you'd derive from spending more time at home (assuming you don't live with awful, stupid in-laws like one Farker mentions). You know, home, the place you should probably enjoy, since you're paying for it whether you eat out or not.

No mention of health hazards of restaurant cooking, either.
You don't control the kitchen, don't come a biatchen...


But you are assuming that people find cooking relaxing. I do, but many don't. If you are not used to it or just don't like it, then time spent in a restaurant talking with you spouse over a glass of wine while you wait for your food, is far more pleasurable and valuable than time spent struggling with dull knives and staring at a cookbook wonder what the hell a julienne is.

Hell, even though I love cooking and experimenting with new dishes, there are some days when I am thrilled that I can pick up some chinese food to go. When I'm tired and leaving work late, I find more value in being able to relax and watch an extra hour of TV or finish the book I'm rading than in cooking.

Everyone's valuation of their time is different.
 
2008-02-15 04:06:52 PM  
danlpoon: Careful. Corvus has the Mods bookmarked and any perceived slight will invite a whiny complaint to the Mods. He is an eggshell. Heck, you're probably already banned.

I just don't like people who can't make valid arguments so they start calling people names.
 
2008-02-15 04:07:16 PM  
To the "cooking for one is more expensive than eating out for one" crowd.

Do 1/3-1/2 the box of pasta or 3/4 of a cup of rice.

Grill or bake 1 chicken breast and freeze the rest of the package uncooked.

Reheat the steamed veggies, or cook only half the can tonight.

Bake 1 roll, not 2.

There, exactly half as cheap as cooking for 2, 1/4 as cheap as cooking for 4. You can buy in bulk even if you're only cooking for one. Freezers are great.
 
2008-02-15 04:07:40 PM  
Katie98_KT: Are you people all incompetent? Eating out is NOT cheaper than cooking. A healthy home cooked meal for 4 should/can cost no more than eating at McDonald's for 1.

Uh, dinner for myself at McDonald's cost me $2 (dollar menu FTW) on Tuesday. So you're saying you can feed a family of 4 for $2?

FAIL
 
2008-02-15 04:07:57 PM  
desktopjockey: DaShredda:

4 Boxes of Pasta... $4

2 - 32oz can of plain sauce... $3

Ground Meat, 3 pounds... $ 5

16 meals... $12

I dont know your portion sizes, but my teenager alone would eat half that in two meals.


yes, i didn't want to say that...but if he was talking a 16 oz box of pasta, with a 2oz serving size, that's only 8 meals at that serving size...and we all know no one eats only 2oz of pasta in a sitting, and dietary guidelines recommend 6-11 servings of starch per day (based on avg needs, mind you).

but i find it's better to groom the goose than spite the turkey.
 
2008-02-15 04:08:09 PM  
Fark_Guy_Rob: So yeah - forgive me, but I'm just plain confused.

Certainly someone who is paid an hourly wage for sleeping can not be bound by your simple rules of logic!
 
2008-02-15 04:09:25 PM  
SilentBob583: Katie98_KT: Are you people all incompetent? Eating out is NOT cheaper than cooking. A healthy home cooked meal for 4 should/can cost no more than eating at McDonald's for 1.

Uh, dinner for myself at McDonald's cost me $2 (dollar menu FTW) on Tuesday. So you're saying you can feed a family of 4 for $2?

FAIL


Lentils + rice + spices + frozen veggies.

If not quite as cheap as $2 then pretty damned close, and about 1000x healthier.
 
2008-02-15 04:10:33 PM  
Summary of Thread

1) There are some people who can cook $5 meals for a family of four. Kudos, that is amazing.
2) There are some people who find that going out to eat is more economical, from either a money or time standpoint (or both). There are lots of factors here, such as location, specific restaurant, personal health requirements, etc.
3) Lots of members of both these factions seem to think not only is the other faction WRONG, but that they are morons, idiots, asshats, and other various bottomfeeders.


/reminds me of politics
 
2008-02-15 04:10:49 PM  
SilentBob583: Katie98_KT: Are you people all incompetent? Eating out is NOT cheaper than cooking. A healthy home cooked meal for 4 should/can cost no more than eating at McDonald's for 1.

Uh, dinner for myself at McDonald's cost me $2 (dollar menu FTW) on Tuesday. So you're saying you can feed a family of 4 for $2?

FAIL


Actually, what I described is cheaper than $2 for one meal. Much cheaper, I was thinking that you wanted 4 meals (1 meal for 4 people) for less than $2...
 
2008-02-15 04:11:18 PM  
Sorry, not buying it. When I was a poor bachelor living alone, I would stop by the local asian market on the way home, so it wasn't a separate trip, almost every day and pick up ingredients. Even with fish or chicken, I could have a meal's worth of food for under $8, which is the average cost of a McMeal. In addition to what I saved in health costs alone by eating real food (hey, if he's going to calculate in his hourly rate, he should be figuring in his wage burden too for paying health insurance) I also had enough of every meal left over to have lunch the next day at work. And that's not even taking into account the purchase-once-use-multiple-times items, like rice and seasonings.

This article is pure crap.
 
2008-02-15 04:11:22 PM  
1. If you arn't taking time off work to cook, then your time is not worth money while cooking.

2. If you only buy food for ONE meal at a time at the grocery store, then you can include gas if you must. But YOURE DOING IT WRONG.

3. Buying a loaf of bread and other ingrediants for a sandwich will cost more than Subway. But again, if you only buy food for ONE meal at a time at the grocery store you are doing it wrong.
 
2008-02-15 04:11:32 PM  
schnarff: This is so true it's disturbing. If you want to cook a decent meal, you'll need meat, vegetables (preferably fresh), spices, and possibly things like potatoes, gravies/sauces, etc. It all adds up fast when you're cooking for two, especially as compared to all of the not-quite-fast-food places that are cropping up with decent menus. Part of me wishes I cooked more, but it's so time-consuming and pricey it's just not worth it most of the time.

No. No, No, No. NO!

We live in a small satellite town half an hour from the city and there are no restaurants nearby -- not counting McDonalds & Taco Bell, which I don't. I'm retired but my wife isn't yet, so I do most of the cooking. When I go to the store, usually twice a week, I get enough stuff for a number of meals, including fresh veggies, so the gas isn't much. (Besides, I drive a Prius.)

I'm a decent cook because I've always enjoyed cooking (and food) and I learned long ago how to cook, in self-defense. There's just the two of us but every third meal or so, I make enough of whatever to feed six or eight people. This is especially true of soup, chili, and various casseroles. The extra goes into the freezer. A couple nights a week, especially if there's something on TV we really want to watch, or if I've been doing yard work all day, I thaw something. No big deal.

We eat pretty well, I bake bread and/or cookies every couple of weeks, and the whole thing costs MUCH, MUCH less than eating out, even at Olive Garden prices. And we live in south Louisiana, where restaurant prices are well below the national average anyway. Besides which, my ribs and my jambalaya are better than you'll find in any restaurant. And you don't have to tip me!
 
2008-02-15 04:11:55 PM  
A piizza is just a giant quesadilla.

So just brush both side of a flour tortilla with olive oil, spread with spaghetti sauce, dapple with store brand mozarrella, procede as per grilled cheese. After cooking a sprinkling of crushed red pepper.

Toppings are optional
 
2008-02-15 04:12:25 PM  
DaShredda
You're basing your argument that more money = more important.

My roomate loves his job.

And it's more important than an NBA star.

Maybe in the world of dick over dick business it doesn't produce money... but who farking cares?


If you have a better, non-subjective, way of measuring the socital value of a worker...other than compensation as decided by a free-market...I'd LOVE to hear it.

You claim that your roommate's job is "IMPORTANT" but you haven't told anyone *why* you feel that way. Some people might feel that a minister or a rabbi has the MOST IMPORTANT job of all, and other people feel they are nothing but scam artists. What objective measure do you offer to settle this?

If there is a fire in a museum and two paintings are within your reach that you could prevent from burning - but they are so large that you can only carry one...how do you decide which to take? Which is more 'important'?

There are a million different criteria you could look at; but the 'fair market value' would be the best. Because the 'fair market value' is determined by the market; by the sum of the wishes of everyone within the market. Something is worth what people are willing to pay for it.

Why should people's time be any different than anything else?
 
2008-02-15 04:14:17 PM  
To cook for many its much cheaper at home but if your single its about the same for decent food at home or out. First if your cooking for 1 who wants to overcook and have to eat the same meal 4 times in a week? Second everyone keeps discussing either fast food or upscale restaraunts when eating out, what about the middle ground? For example I have a little mexican restaraunt down the block (I can walk to it) that I can get a huge burrito for 4 bucks. The burrito is ok healthy (beans, brown rice, chicken and assorted vegies) and as cheap if not cheaper than trying to cook a meal for one that is of comparable taste and healthyness. The conclusion, it just not practical to cook for one person and barely practical to cook for two people.
 
2008-02-15 04:14:32 PM  
Fark_Guy_Rob: The statement of yours about it not being cost effective to cook because your time is worth $20 dollars an hour; implies that you'd have to give up $20 dollars an hour for each hour you spend cooking.

Never said my time is worth 20/hr.


The next statement of yours that I saw, said you sometimes earn $20 dollars an hour while sleeping. That implies that you earn money without any direct action on your part; which would mean taking time away from your job to cook (like when you sleep) would not cause you to incur any 'cost'.

This is true. But I still find my time valuable. Sleep is something I have to do. It is actually worth a lot. If I don't sleep I would lose the amount of money I could generate. So sleep is very important. Cooking on the other hand I can get someone to do unlike sleep. Cost incurred for the time and value of the time is not the same.


Bragging or not, that doesn't seem to make sense to me. Either you work all the time and any time you take away from your job is going to cost you your hourly wage($20 or $40, or $60 an hour) or it won't.

So, if you work all the time and can't spare anytime for cooking without not getting paid your hourly wage for those house AND you sometimes get paid while sleeping - the only reasonable explanation is that you sleep on the job; when you aren't supposed to. If you were an 'On-Call' type employee who made some sort of bonus while carrying the 'On-Call-Pager' or something; you could still cook while on call, just as you could sleep.

So yeah - forgive me, but I'm just plain confused.


Yeah, you don't think of it the same way I do.

If I could pay for someone to sleep for me I would thing about doing that. But that is not possible.

You have the fallacy that value of my time is either work or not work. But other tasks can have different values that are not work.

For example Sleeping has lots of value. Working on my Finances also has lots of value. They are obviously more valuable than cooking.

Arguing about this here has little value but I am not perfect.
 
2008-02-15 04:14:55 PM  
Five is Right Out: If you only buy food for ONE meal at a time at the grocery store, then you can include gas if you must. But YOURE DOING IT WRONG.

Who the fark lives far enough from a grocery store that gas cost become a consideration?
 
2008-02-15 04:15:55 PM  
Fark_Guy_Rob: DaShredda
You're basing your argument that more money = more important.

My roomate loves his job.

And it's more important than an NBA star.

Maybe in the world of dick over dick business it doesn't produce money... but who farking cares?

If you have a better, non-subjective, way of measuring the socital value of a worker...other than compensation as decided by a free-market...I'd LOVE to hear it.

You claim that your roommate's job is "IMPORTANT" but you haven't told anyone *why* you feel that way. Some people might feel that a minister or a rabbi has the MOST IMPORTANT job of all, and other people feel they are nothing but scam artists. What objective measure do you offer to settle this?

If there is a fire in a museum and two paintings are within your reach that you could prevent from burning - but they are so large that you can only carry one...how do you decide which to take? Which is more 'important'?

There are a million different criteria you could look at; but the 'fair market value' would be the best. Because the 'fair market value' is determined by the market; by the sum of the wishes of everyone within the market. Something is worth what people are willing to pay for it.

Why should people's time be any different than anything else?


So if Bill Gates and a child were trapped in a burning building and you could only save one, you'd save Gates?

Most people's conscience wouldn't be comfortable with that.
 
2008-02-15 04:16:11 PM  
Tanthalas39: Summary of Thread

1) There are some people who can cook $5 meals for a family of four. Kudos, that is amazing.
2) There are some people who find that going out to eat is more economical, from either a money or time standpoint (or both). There are lots of factors here, such as location, specific restaurant, personal health requirements, etc.
3) Lots of members of both these factions seem to think not only is the other faction WRONG, but that they are morons, idiots, asshats, and other various bottomfeeders.


/reminds me of politics


no, it is an absolute f*cking fact that you can buy your own food for MUCH less money than it would cost to eat out.
 
2008-02-15 04:16:22 PM  
Telos:
Look, once you factor in the costs of food going bad the equation changes. I had to stop buying bread because it always went bad before I finished a loaf. I don't think I've ever finished a thing of broccoli or bunch of bananas before they went bad. It sucks, but living alone it's really hard to use the food you buy efficiently...


Telos, I sympathize, but you're doing it wrong. ;)

I just made a sandwich yesterday from a loaf of bread that was almost 3 weeks old and had no mold on it. The most common reason bread goes bad is from people touching the inside of the bag or other slices of bread when they reach in.

By some bread and do this:

1) Wash your hands ( properly ) before touching your bread ( or any other food for that matter).

2) When you put your hand into the bread bag, try minimize touching other slices of bread and the inside of the bag ( nigh-impossible to avoid any touch, but you can usually get alot accomplished by giving a little push from the outside of the bag to flip slices forward into our other hand, etc

3) Leave the loaf ( in the bag tied shut out on a table or in a pantry but in an area of low moisture and out of direct sunlight. Don't keep it in the fridge, or anything else like that.

Your loaf of bread will last weeks this way.

If you buy fresh bread from a bakery YMMV considerably more in either direction. It is amazingly clear when a bread baker doesn't wash his hands. e.g. 2 months ago I bought a loaf of french bread that I ended up not eating immediately. It sat in the pantry in its bag ( unopened ) for only 3 days and when I got it out there was black mold in the perfect shape of a puffy hand print on the loaf. nice.
 
2008-02-15 04:17:06 PM  
hbk72777: Whoops, Meant to say I can get 2 burgers and a fry off the Wendys dollar menu,with Lettuce and tomato or one with bacon. You can't make that dinner cheaper.

Except that's not "dinner." No way. That's just pushing your way up to the trough and gobbling for five minutes.
 
2008-02-15 04:17:38 PM  
danlpoon: Big Bad Poon

I saw them in concert last week. They opened for the Pussycat Dolls.
 
2008-02-15 04:17:42 PM  
My time is so valuable that I try to find ways to work less.
 
2008-02-15 04:17:43 PM  
Get yourself a rice cooker!
www.johnlewis.com

Rice in the big bulk bags is close to free.

Then, get some eggs, frozen veggies, and a salty meat (chinese sausages, bacon, bbq pork, roasted chicken, etcetc). A splash of oil and a sauce (soy or teriyaki works fine), and you're done. Fried rice, tasty and cheap as f*ck. If you add extra hot sauce, the spiciness makes you fell full faster, so you don't eat your way to obesity, either.

Rice, the magic meal extender.
 
2008-02-15 04:18:36 PM  
janks369
no, it is an absolute f*cking fact that you can buy your own food for MUCH less money than it would cost to eat out.

You obviously belong in faction 1. And you affirmed statement 3. Thanks!
 
2008-02-15 04:19:50 PM  
Chef salad and soup for my family..

head of lettuce-$3
2 tomatoes-$3
cucumber-$1
green onions-$0.50
carrots-$1 (half bag)
pepper-$1
4 eggs-$0.50
mushrooms-$2.50
ham-$1
loaf of bread-$2.50 (half)
pound of beef-$2
bag of frozen mixed veg-$1
beef broth-$2
tomato sauce-$2
1/2 gallon of milk-$2.75
Brownies-$1
Ice cream-$2.50 (half container)

This is a normal, not at all extravagant meal for us and it's right around $30 for soup, salad, bread and dessert. Yes, we could eat beans (and do!) but you can't eat that all of the time. It's the veg that gets you. Too bad you gotta have it.
 
2008-02-15 04:20:43 PM  
Jzit0: The conclusion, it just not practical to cook for one person and barely practical to cook for two people.

I learned this trick in school called division. It allows me to take a recipe that was made for four people and calculate the proportions for one person. I also have this magic device called a freezer. It allows me to store leftovers for longer than one week. Along with my microwave, it has given me the magical power to cook more than one portion and eat the leftovers at a later date. Up to six months in some cases.
 
2008-02-15 04:22:14 PM  
TheFatManCometh: I must say though, Pizza and Chinese/Thai food is ALWAYS ALWAYS ALWAYS cheaper than you making it... and it will taste better too. Homemade pizza or chinese/thai never comes out very good. Perhaps this is why these restaurants dominate the delivery industry.

This.

I know a guy who did a major kitchen renovation. He had them install a pizza oven because they make pizzas for family night. His wife told me that the oven cost about $12K. I did the math, and I found that I could eat one medium Ledo pizza per week for 20 years for the cost of that oven, and not have to make my own pizzas.
 
2008-02-15 04:23:33 PM  
Jzit0: To cook for many its much cheaper at home but if your single its about the same for decent food at home or out. First if your cooking for 1 who wants to overcook and have to eat the same meal 4 times in a week? Second everyone keeps discussing either fast food or upscale restaraunts when eating out, what about the middle ground? For example I have a little mexican restaraunt down the block (I can walk to it) that I can get a huge burrito for 4 bucks. The burrito is ok healthy (beans, brown rice, chicken and assorted vegies) and as cheap if not cheaper than trying to cook a meal for one that is of comparable taste and healthyness. The conclusion, it just not practical to cook for one person and barely practical to cook for two people.

As someone who cooks for one every day and spends ~$65 a week on food I would disagree. That is my total food budget -- breakfast, lunch, dinner, snacks, etc. I don't eat crap either. Tonight I will have a roasted pork tenderloin with apples and brown rice for dinner. Tenderloins were buy one get one free a couple weeks ago, so I bought two, cut them into thirds, and froze them individually. I'll probably have some leftover pork that I'll make into a sandwich tomorrow; yet the meal will cost about $3.50 and take 5 minutes to prep. Brown rice is slow cooking, but it involves adding rice to water and then watching tv for 40 minutes. I could go for white and cut it down to 15.
 
2008-02-15 04:23:35 PM  
For a guy who thinks his time is too valuable to spend cooking, Corvus sure is spending a lot of time on this thread.
 
2008-02-15 04:23:42 PM  
MuppetPastor: Pismo at the store: $30. That's probably 7 or 8 good steaks

I had never heard of a pismo, so I looked it up!

A PSMO (pronounced 'pismo') is a whole tenderloin vaccum sealed from the butcher. (new window)

www.freshfromthemarket.com
 
2008-02-15 04:23:58 PM  
jpsm: zymurgist: I have a refrigerator dedicated to nothing but beer. (Well, I have some odd bottles of wine and Bailey's, but still.)

Lunch tomorrow at the Appalachian Brewing Co. in Gettysburg.

Party at Zymurgist's house!


Oatmeal stout and brown ale on tap. They're OK but not as good as my IPA, which is still fermenting because we drank the old 5 gallon keg.

Wanna bring some food? That seems to be lacking at my house...
 
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