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(Charlotte.com)   Judge overturns murder conviction for alcoholic. Says AA confessions are "confidential religious conversations"   (charlotte.com) divider line 29
    More: Asinine  
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1147 clicks; posted to Main » on 02 Aug 2001 at 10:23 AM (12 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2001-08-02 10:32:10 AM
So if I kill someone i can go to an AA meeting and tell everyone and clear my conscience and go on with my life. Wow! Give me a farkin break. THROW HIM IN JAIL. Its a meeting, not a farkin protected confessional.
 
2001-08-02 10:39:11 AM
My name is Gary and I offed an intern...
 
2001-08-02 10:44:44 AM
AA: Assassins Anonymous
 
2001-08-02 10:45:20 AM
After 14 pints I've been known to talk to God on the big white telephone..
 
2001-08-02 10:50:32 AM
On a side note....is it just me or is NextCard trying to move in on X10's territory as the most annoying pop-under advertiser around?
 
2001-08-02 10:59:14 AM
I have to agree that the AA meeting should not be used as evendence... Find a real way to convict him.... It is supposed to be anonymous and confidental..... I think he should go to jail but not this way.
 
2001-08-02 11:02:12 AM
As a member of a 12-step fellowship, I think this is ridiculous. I also think the confidentiality of "religious conversations" is ridiculous, if only for the slippery slope.

The program is all about accepting responsibility and facing consequences. Welcome to reality, Paul.

Wasn't this used in a "Law & Order" episode?
 
2001-08-02 11:04:29 AM
Yes, if you are a member of a religious cult, they overlook the small things like murder, raping altar boys and political careers.
 
2001-08-02 11:20:29 AM
AA is a religion?? HORSE shiat. Throw this idiot in prison. Then, when he starts being assraped ten times a day, tell him that the assrapes are "confidential religious conversations" and as such nothing will be done to stop them.
 
2001-08-02 11:22:49 AM
I don't think religious confession should be exempt, either. If somebody says they did it, nail 'em.
 
2001-08-02 11:34:15 AM
Anybody that's ever seen Law and Order knows this is obvious. Talix18, yes this was in SEVERAL L and O eps.
 
2001-08-02 11:38:24 AM
The fact that Brieant stayed Cox's release to allow time for an appeal makes me think he doubts his own ruling.
 
2001-08-02 11:44:34 AM
Not to mention that the literature in my fellowship, which is derived from AA steps and traditions, specifically states that "this is a spiritual, not religious, program." AA's Big Book was certainly written with a major Christian bias, but the fellowship has probably evolved and established a broader idea of "Higher Power".

Not that you cared. Again, I think protected disclosure to any "religious" representative is hooey.
 
2001-08-02 02:12:02 PM
First of all, from my understanding of statute law, the only protected religious conversations are those specifically protected by the church, and those between a clergyman and a member of thier congregation. AA isn't even a religious establishment, they're a non-profit organization. This is like saying that conversations between PeTA members is protected.

Second, you would think that he, being an AA member, would attempt to adopt the Twelve Step, if he really wanted help. There's bunch about admitting you did something wrong. One would think that if he freely admitted this already, plus the fact that he was drunk at the time, would mean he would accept the punishment for what he did, not try to get out of it.

Step 4) We made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves

Step 5) We admitted to God, to ourselves and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs.

Step 8) We made a list of all persons we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all.

Step 9) We made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others

Step 10) Continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong promptly admitted it.


"The boy needs to learn how to weasel out of things. It's what separates us from the animals....except the weasel."
 
2001-08-02 02:32:24 PM
Yes, if you are a member of a religious cult, they overlook the small things like murder, raping altar boys and political careers.
Soupgoblin Are you hinting Catholicism to us as a religious cult? If you are, Cool! I agree with you.
 
2001-08-02 02:46:48 PM
I think the honorable judge might have said a few things in HIS AA meetings that he doesn't want to be held accountable for...


On a side note the whole idea that you can have a confidential privileged conversation with anyone besides your lawyer and doctor is absurd to me. Religion is not to be used as a scape-goat to make you feel better about yourself after wronging others. Consequences for all.
 
2001-08-02 03:33:27 PM
"Smile pretty and watch your back."
Ani DiFranco
 
2001-08-02 03:44:21 PM
I just thought of something else, with any privilege, if there is any third party present, it breaks it. (Like if you're talking to your lawyer at a cocktail party with a group of friends. That testimony can then be compelled). If there was anybody at the meeting that wasn't a member of AA (which there usually is), then it's no longer privileged.
 
2001-08-02 03:52:15 PM
That does it, I'm getting blind drunk tonight, fathering a dozen children I won't care about or support, axe-murder a few innocent bystanders, stick a rubber in my Wendy's chili and file suit so they'll settle, and above all, confess.
 
2001-08-02 04:08:33 PM
murder is the only thing that eases the pain of not being drunk.
 
2001-08-02 04:40:07 PM
i dont get why it's asinine
 
2001-08-02 04:44:45 PM
I think that's a load of heaping horse poo. If someone says they did it and they have evidence that they said it, convict 'em. I do think, however, that in situations like that they ought to take some off the sentence, because the person who admited it in an AA meeting or to a preacher, or something of that effect, is truly sorry.
 
2001-08-02 04:56:08 PM
It's insane how many laws out there that protect drunks.
Also it seems like courts are saying that if you're drunk you are no longer responsible for your actions.
 
2001-08-02 05:57:40 PM
This was better as a Law and Order episode...

If I recall, at least there the guy got justice served to him on a hot platter of bubba.
 
2001-08-02 06:11:07 PM
Does that mean that if one were to confess, say, gang rapeing then dismembering several co-eds before seting their houses on fire, right here on Fark, that it would be inadmissable in court?

Cool... I'll keep that in mind.
"Brought to you by the Booze Council. Because Booze really satisfies. Booze takes a dull party and makes it better! Booze makes you popular and heals all wounds! B double O Z E... BOOOOOZE!" - Crow, Tom, Joel, MST3K
 
2001-08-02 08:01:14 PM
That's the thing though, people, he wasn't AT a meeting when he said it! He just happened to have in common with these people that he was a member of AA and so were they. Note down near the bottom of the article.

This was NOT NOT NOT during a meeting!

Game set match kerslam. Lock him up and keep him there.
 
2001-08-02 09:19:24 PM
http://WWW.DRUNKENMESS.COM/
 
2001-08-03 12:03:05 AM
If you hack up all the people at your AA meeting, is that "protected religious communication"?
 
2001-08-03 05:02:59 PM
when i was 15 my father strongarmed me into to 3 N.A. meetings.

(don't ask)

on the third meeting, ol' dad was appalled when one of the 12 steppers barfed all over himself, sick from withdrawl.

pop said "i had no idea it was going to be so DIRTY in there".

i never had to go back.

score another strike for tough love.
 
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