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(BBC)   Actual headline proving English no longer speak it: "Snow-holers using new 'poo chute'" (pic)   (news.bbc.co.uk) divider line 56
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18066 clicks; posted to Main » on 04 Jan 2008 at 5:33 AM (6 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2008-01-04 12:47:01 AM
They better hope that their plan doesn't crap out.
 
2008-01-04 01:08:06 AM
How do you get your arse up to the opening?
 
2008-01-04 02:57:29 AM
My guess is they broke up with the last one.
 
2008-01-04 03:06:49 AM
cache.jalopnik.com

Are deeply concerned
 
2008-01-04 05:37:48 AM
Fo shizzle ma nizzle.
 
2008-01-04 05:42:40 AM
Both "Snow Holers" and "Poo Chutes" would be great names for bands.
 
2008-01-04 05:45:18 AM
I was trying to think of something witty involving "glory-holers" and "spoo chute", but it's too early. I'm going back to bed.
 
2008-01-04 05:45:31 AM
"poo chute"... DRTFA, but isn't that a what you call a monkey version of duck hunt?

/:|
 
2008-01-04 05:53:42 AM
Snow Way, dudes.
 
2008-01-04 05:55:00 AM
So does the old poo chute get the house or the kids?
 
2008-01-04 06:01:46 AM
Translation of tfa into real english someone? What is a snow hole and why are people pooing in it?
 
2008-01-04 06:01:57 AM
Actual headline proving English no longer speak it: "Snow-holers using new 'poo chute'" (pic)

Que ?
 
2008-01-04 06:04:19 AM
Everyone's laughing, and riding, and snowholing except Buster.
 
2008-01-04 06:08:07 AM
Zarya: Translation of tfa into real english someone? What is a snow hole and why are people pooing in it?

Snow hole: Hole dug into a snow bank for the purposes of overnight shelter
Poo: faeces
Idiot: Person who doesn't walk their waste out from a wilderness area and dispose of it responsibly, as opposed to burying it in the snow outside their snow hole, only for it to reappear when the snow thaws
Poo chute: Waste disposal for responsible disposable of the aforementioned poo

HTH
 
2008-01-04 06:08:46 AM
YAY! Poop thread!
 
2008-01-04 06:12:54 AM
Not to put a dent in anyone's hat, but it's a headline, and therefore exempt from any such known rules of English and grammar. Apart from the rules for headlines I suppose.

Hell, if you want to pick on headlines for spelling and grammatical accuracy, go and read a copy of the Sun. Or Fark...
 
2008-01-04 06:14:19 AM
FarkinNortherner
Actual [Adjective] headline [Subject] proving [Predicate verb-gerund form] English [Indirect object] no [negator] longer [adverb] speak [Direct object infinitive form] it [Definite article]: "Snow-holers using new 'poo chute'" (pic)

phew, OK that was actually pretty tough; I still think the direct object of the predicate being an infinitive or a preposition may be incorrect...

any thoughts?
 
2008-01-04 06:15:46 AM
The truth of life is, Sooner or later you will be faced with dealing with some one elses Shiat.

You snow what I'm talking about.
 
2008-01-04 06:23:13 AM
Women have a fourth hole !!!
 
2008-01-04 06:25:09 AM
whiteoleander.warnerbros.com
"There are two seasons in Scotland: June and winter."
 
2008-01-04 06:25:09 AM
Egon Spengler: FarkinNortherner
Actual [Adjective] headline [Subject] proving [Predicate verb-gerund form] English [Indirect object] no [negator] longer [adverb] speak [Direct object infinitive form] it [Definite article]: "Snow-holers using new 'poo chute'" (pic)

phew, OK that was actually pretty tough; I still think the direct object of the predicate being an infinitive or a preposition may be incorrect...

any thoughts?

I think the intent and meaning of the message was successfully conveyed to a native speaker of the language in the first go. Thus, I (and some linguists) consider it correct, arbitrary rules aside.
 
2008-01-04 06:27:03 AM
Egon Spengler: I still think the direct object of the predicate being an infinitive or a preposition may be incorrect.

That would reflect what I was taught. I should warn you that my PTSD, which I have suffered ever since Mrs. Knight's English class, has now kicked in, forcing me to beat you to death with a copy of Treble and Vallins.
 
2008-01-04 06:39:58 AM
FarkinNortherner: forcing me to beat you to death with a copy of Treble and Vallins.

My tome of preference for such action would be Debrett's, but I am tempted to annotate your suggestion into my heavy, hardback copy in anticipation of your newsletter subscription details.
 
2008-01-04 06:42:42 AM
FarkinNortherner


ah the joys of diagramming sentences! What better rite of passage to teach a youngster the pedagogical rule of thumb and tyranny of petty schoolmasters.

/yes, the rules are arbitrary, its English!
 
2008-01-04 06:55:42 AM
Egon Spengler: FarkinNortherner
Actual [Adjective] headline [Subject] proving [Predicate verb-gerund form] English [Indirect object] no [negator] longer [adverb] speak [Direct object infinitive form] it [Definite article]: "Snow-holers using new 'poo chute'" (pic)

phew, OK that was actually pretty tough; I still think the direct object of the predicate being an infinitive or a preposition may be incorrect...

any thoughts?


Why is 'English' the 'indirect object'? Isn't it part of an object-clause?

Isn't 'proving' a present participle? Gerunds are verbal nouns.

How is 'speak' a direct object? It's infinitive, but 'it' would seem to be the direct object.

But then again, I only know grammar through Latin, so we may use the same words to describe different things...
 
2008-01-04 07:28:21 AM
thaduke: Isn't 'proving' a present participle? Gerunds are verbal nouns.

I think 'proving' is a Vendler activity predicate, since the proof is ongoing, rather than time bound, in the progressive tense, and acting upon the definite article 'it'. Not sure there is a gerund in that sentence.

But I was always rubbish at this stuff (as demonstrated by my starting a sentence with 'but')
 
2008-01-04 08:18:57 AM
thaduke: Egon Spengler: FarkinNortherner
Actual [Adjective] headline [Subject] proving [Predicate verb-gerund form] English [Indirect object] no [negator] longer [adverb] speak [Direct object infinitive form] it [Definite article]: "Snow-holers using new 'poo chute'" (pic)

phew, OK that was actually pretty tough; I still think the direct object of the predicate being an infinitive or a preposition may be incorrect...

any thoughts?

Why is 'English' the 'indirect object'? Isn't it part of an object-clause?

Isn't 'proving' a present participle? Gerunds are verbal nouns.

How is 'speak' a direct object? It's infinitive, but 'it' would seem to be the direct object.

But then again, I only know grammar through Latin, so we may use the same words to describe different things...


I argue that "English no longer speak it" is a clause rather than a phrase.
"[S]peak" is inflected to agree with "[the] English".
[the] English" is a subject and not an object ("it", referring to English, is an object.)
 
2008-01-04 08:21:45 AM
Digging a hole in snow and sleeping in it is considered a sport?
 
2008-01-04 08:23:44 AM
ram it ram it ram it ram it up your poo chute.

\F.Zappa
\\not really
\\\first thing that cam to mind
\\\\sorry
 
2008-01-04 08:42:42 AM
Snow holing.. is that what they are calling anal cream pies now?
 
2008-01-04 08:48:37 AM
snow holing is a snow mans glory hole.
 
2008-01-04 09:03:26 AM
"Snow-holers"

That is what the activity is called.

"using"

Looks like a word to me.

"new 'poo chute'"

The journo flagged the idiomatic term thus drawing attention to it. Looks like a normal headline to me.

/-1 subby
 
2008-01-04 09:07:29 AM
img181.imageshack.us
 
2008-01-04 09:11:44 AM
i190.photobucket.com
 
2008-01-04 09:58:06 AM
I think the Fark headline is finicky and wrong. First off, headlines aren't spoken English. Second, headlines have enjoyed comic latitude since the early days of Variety ("Stix hix nix pix").

As a matter of style, the Fark submitter could use fewer words with "-ing" suffixes.
 
2008-01-04 10:03:13 AM
I thought it was corn-holers that used the poo chute???
 
2008-01-04 10:07:22 AM
FarkinNortherner: Idiot: Person who doesn't walk their waste out from a wilderness area and dispose of it responsibly, as

What about all those deer, bears and other animals that don't walk their waste out? I guess human shiat doesn't decompose anymore because we've evolved past that...
 
2008-01-04 10:28:35 AM
The BBC's English is getting worse every year.

For example, for the past few years, its reporters have been using plural verbs with collective nouns (e.g.: "The family have said", instead of "The family has said").

I have been sending emails to their webmaster pointing out such errors on their website, and they have always promptly fixed them. For example, I just wrote them about the error in the last paragraph of this article (new window).

P.S. I just looked, and they fixed it, within 10 minutes!

But there's nothing I can do about their errors in the BBC broadcast.
 
2008-01-04 10:43:29 AM
Onamotapoeia, allomorphs! Articulation disyllabic heteronyms, non-Rhotic. Of course, it's a matter of orthoepy polysyllabic received pronunciation! Furthermore, up yours!
 
2008-01-04 10:43:47 AM
stvdallas: What about all those deer, bears and other animals that don't walk their waste out?

What about them ? Deer, bears, and other animals (not that there is much by way of large mammals on the Cairngorm plateau, other than 100 or so reindeer) tend to avoid areas where there are a lot of humans. Those areas are primarily despoiled by humans, in a manner that's particularly harmful to human health, and, unlike animal faeces, is totally avoidable.

Does it decompose ? Yes, of course, when the thaw comes, but the shiat in a snow cave in November may well still be there in March.
 
2008-01-04 10:44:18 AM
Davide: I have been sending emails to their webmaster pointing out such errors on their website, and they have always promptly fixed them. For example, I just wrote them about the error in the last paragraph of this article (new window).

You need to get laid or something.
 
2008-01-04 11:01:12 AM
40below: You need to get laid or something.

And you have HOW many greenlights?
 
2008-01-04 11:02:21 AM
Notabunny: So does the old poo chute get the house or the kids?
Nice. I am cleaning the coffee off my screen now.
 
2008-01-04 11:03:17 AM
Once AGAIN.

English is not the same as British, British is not the same as English.

As the story is in the Cairngorms, located in SCOTLAND, you can refer to English as the langauge but not English as either the British or particularly the Scottish.

English refers to a language, English can also be a people.

Scottish refers to a people and covers about 4 languages.

British is when you are talking about all of the citizens of the UK, Including The English, Welsh, Scots, Northern Irish (and some would include the Manx)

How come none of you Americans can folow this.

I can name the state capitals of near enough every US state, and you lot can't grasp the idea that there is more than one country in the UK.

pardon my shiatty typing.
 
2008-01-04 11:10:05 AM
Baron Krelve: 40below: You need to get laid or something.

And you have HOW many greenlights?


Touché!
 
2008-01-04 12:01:27 PM
How do you poo in that?
 
2008-01-04 12:07:56 PM
WTF is "faeces?"

Faces + Feces?
 
2008-01-04 12:18:27 PM
FarkinNortherner: Those areas are primarily despoiled by humans

de-
pref.

1. Do or make the opposite of; reverse: decriminalize.
2. Remove or remove from: delouse; deoxygenate.
3. Out of: deplane; defenestration.
4. Reduce; degrade

spoil (spoil)
v. tr.

1.
- To impair the value or quality of.
- To damage irreparably; ruin.
- To plunder; despoil.
- To take by force.
2. To impair the completeness, perfection, or unity of; flaw grievously


Thus, de-spoil = to undo the spoiling?

No.

de·spoil (dĭ-spoil')

1. To sack; plunder.
2. To deprive of something valuable by force; rob


The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Ed.


Nice job, English.
 
2008-01-04 12:19:29 PM
I once had a guy threaten to tear me a new poo chute.
 
2008-01-04 12:26:30 PM
sigersonic: Once AGAIN.

English is not the same as British, British is not the same as English.

As the story is in the Cairngorms, located in SCOTLAND, you can refer to English as the langauge but not English as either the British or particularly the Scottish.

English refers to a language, English can also be a people.

Scottish refers to a people and covers about 4 languages.

British is when you are talking about all of the citizens of the UK, Including The English, Welsh, Scots, Northern Irish (and some would include the Manx)

How come none of you Americans can folow this.

I can name the state capitals of near enough every US state, and you lot can't grasp the idea that there is more than one country in the UK.



It's cute when the Scots, Irish, and Welsh pretend they aren't just (second class) citizens of the UK.
You aren't a country; you're a colony.
AND YOU'RE COLONIZED BY WANKERS!
 
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