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(Denver Post)   Normally, when the propeller falls off of your single engine airplane over the Rocky Mountains, things don't end well. Then there's this guy   (denverpost.com ) divider line 181
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34093 clicks; posted to Main » on 28 Dec 2007 at 6:36 AM (8 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2007-12-28 02:10:18 PM  
IdBeCrazyIf: Mor Beal: That captain and his crew were amazing, as was the pilot who was deadheading on that flight...keeping up a sense of humor and perspective throughout.

You'll find that pilots, like ship captains of yore are a swarthy bunch.


Pilots don't get excited. Yelling "HELP" over the radio doesn't get you any help.
 
2007-12-28 02:15:18 PM  
FlukeBoy: Jeez.
If these small planes are so safe, then why have several people on this board experienced some sort of catastrophic failure in one?

43 yrs old and I've NEVER had my engine in my car blow out, throw a rod, or even stall, while driving.


So, either they're not so safe, or the people here are lying about their experiences, or the laws of averages doesn't apply here.


How often do you see news reports at night about cars stalling/breaking down? Never. If they reported every case then you'd be watching the news for 5 hours every night. Aircraft incidents/accidents are so rare that they always make the news. Thats why you hear about them so much.

Start a new thread with the goal of every farker telling their story about how their car broke down. You'd have one of those little infinity signs next to the count and fark's dbase would crash. :p
 
2007-12-28 02:18:33 PM  
snortimer: FlukeBoy: Jeez.
If these small planes are so safe, then why have several people on this board experienced some sort of catastrophic failure in one?

43 yrs old and I've NEVER had my engine in my car blow out, throw a rod, or even stall, while driving.


So, either they're not so safe, or the people here are lying about their experiences, or the laws of averages doesn't apply here.

How often do you see news reports at night about cars stalling/breaking down? Never. If they reported every case then you'd be watching the news for 5 hours every night. Aircraft incidents/accidents are so rare that they always make the news. Thats why you hear about them so much.

Start a new thread with the goal of every farker telling their story about how their car broke down. You'd have one of those little infinity signs next to the count and fark's dbase would crash. :p


I have 3200 hours, most in Hueys, and never had an engine fail. Even when someone shot a 1" square hole in the combustion chamber. I'm a big Lycoming fan (no pun intended).
 
2007-12-28 02:18:34 PM  
The nice thing about those little planes is that the wing flaps are controlled mechanically with pedals and cables. It seems low tech, but makes the control of the wings independent of the electrical system and the engine. If you run out of gas, you can still control the flaps mechanically. (I don't recall what controls the tail - I am sure someone here can refresh my memory.) The thing that is outstanding about this guy is that takeoff and landing with a mountain airport is really dicey with all the strange wind conditions. I don't know if its his big brass ones or his Mighty Brain. I'd say the latter.
 
2007-12-28 02:19:37 PM  
maglite: Umm... no one has commented on this: where the fark did the propeller end up??!?

I'm imagining some schmoe out picking up his dog's shiat in the backyard when he hears a loud whistling, looks up, and the heavy prop comes spiraling in and food-processes his ass.


Let me see, considering the height at which it broke off and the speed of rotation.

vr=r3-c2/mass*coefficient of friction.

Based on some quick calculations, I think it should land in 2 to 3 days somewhere in Asia.
 
2007-12-28 02:26:28 PM  
jimb213:
A good friend of my dad is an avid pilot who lives in colorado, and he said on one of his last training sessions, the instructor pulled the throttle back and had him glide back and land at the airfield. They had cleared it with the airfield, so the guys on the ground knew what was happening. I dunno that I would want to do that, personally.


Last training session? Hell, I used to do that to my students all the time. failing an engine anywhere near an airfield is a joke. No challenge whatsoever. Failing it over water/trees/mountains etc... thats the real test. I would sit back and watch my student go through their decision making process. As long as you're able to adequately line up with a landing site, be on altitude and airspeed then you're fine. fark up the approach, fark up the landing.
 
2007-12-28 02:30:16 PM  
IdBeCrazyIf:
You'll find that pilots, like ship captains of yore are a swarthy bunch.


img176.imageshack.us

You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.
 
2007-12-28 02:31:59 PM  
Inflatable Rhetoric: IdBeCrazyIf: Mor Beal: That captain and his crew were amazing, as was the pilot who was deadheading on that flight...keeping up a sense of humor and perspective throughout.

You'll find that pilots, like ship captains of yore are a swarthy bunch.

Pilots don't get excited. Yelling "HELP" over the radio doesn't get you any help.


It doesn't make your skin any darker, either.
 
2007-12-28 02:41:25 PM  
dittybopper: Inflatable Rhetoric: IdBeCrazyIf: Mor Beal: That captain and his crew were amazing, as was the pilot who was deadheading on that flight...keeping up a sense of humor and perspective throughout.

You'll find that pilots, like ship captains of yore are a swarthy bunch.

Pilots don't get excited. Yelling "HELP" over the radio doesn't get you any help.

It doesn't make your skin any darker, either.


Nothing I can do about that.
 
2007-12-28 02:42:41 PM  
As a standard part of glider training the instructor will pull the release so that the glider releases the rope connecting it to the tow-plane. This is usually done at about 200 feet altitude (metric: suck it) while heading away from the airport. It is another of those training "What are you going to do now." tests that someone has to pass before flying on their own.

I've only once had a student put it down in a bean field and not make it back to the airport. He was an Air Force F-15 pilot. He was a little too used to having an engine strapped to his butt and had to change his thinking.

/Bean field landing executed safely.
 
2007-12-28 02:55:27 PM  
radinator:

I've only once had a student put it down in a bean field and not make it back to the airport. He was an Air Force F-15 pilot. He was a little too used to having an engine strapped to his butt and had to change his thinking.

/Bean field landing executed safely.


it was a milagro.
 
2007-12-28 03:10:38 PM  
dittybopper: Inflatable Rhetoric: IdBeCrazyIf: Mor Beal: That captain and his crew were amazing, as was the pilot who was deadheading on that flight...keeping up a sense of humor and perspective throughout.

You'll find that pilots, like ship captains of yore are a swarthy bunch.

Pilots don't get excited. Yelling "HELP" over the radio doesn't get you any help.

It doesn't make your skin any darker, either.


And yelling help over the radio is exactly what pilots do. Mayday Mayday is actually from the French term "M'aidé M'aidé" which literally means "help me" "help me"
 
2007-12-28 03:19:06 PM  
Buy that man a beer.
 
2007-12-28 04:01:55 PM  
"Some pilots lose a wing prop and panic, then there are those who in the same situation just request a lower altitude from air traffic control." I've got a beer waiting for this guy if he ever wants to collect.
 
2007-12-28 04:02:04 PM  
FTFA: Suspended at 16,000 feet in an airplane with no power, no propeller and motor oil streaming across the front windshield, 60-year-old Barry Cox remembered that panic wasn't going to do much good.

Must have had his Hitchhiker's Guide in the glove box..
 
2007-12-28 04:15:18 PM  
JohDHJ: Reminds me of a movie I saw when I was much younger. A guy goes into the Alaskan wilderness to study animals or something like that. Anyways, to get to the wilderness, he has to charter a small single-engine airplane. Mid-flight, the engine stalls. The guy panics, but the pilot gleefully swings outside and repairs the engine, pops back into the cabin, restarts the engine, and resumes the journey all without breaking a sweat.

Does anyone know what movie I'm talking about?


Think it was Never Cry Wolf based on the book by Farley Mowat
 
2007-12-28 04:15:21 PM  
goethe_helen_hunt: The nice thing about those little planes is that the wing flaps are controlled mechanically with pedals and cables.

That depends on the aircraft. Anything the size of a Cessna 172 and up will normally have electrically driven flaps. In an engine-out situation, the flaps could be driven by the battery, but you'll only want to use the flaps when you are assured of making your chosen landing spot.
 
2007-12-28 04:50:25 PM  
montex: Damn! Talk about a big pair of brass ones. Clearly, with bravery like that, he could not possibly be a Democrat.

what a d][psh][t thing to say.

congratulations!

you win the 2007 internet award

www.post-gazette.com

for exceeding stupidity in statement and worthlessness in life.

please consider suicide.
 
2007-12-28 05:15:33 PM  
PastryChef: JohDHJ: Reminds me of a movie I saw when I was much younger. A guy goes into the Alaskan wilderness to study animals or something like that. Anyways, to get to the wilderness, he has to charter a small single-engine airplane. Mid-flight, the engine stalls. The guy panics, but the pilot gleefully swings outside and repairs the engine, pops back into the cabin, restarts the engine, and resumes the journey all without breaking a sweat.

Does anyone know what movie I'm talking about?

Think it was Never Cry Wolf based on the book by Farley Mowat


Thank you!
 
2007-12-28 05:21:37 PM  
This dude's got more balls then Spalding.
 
2007-12-28 05:23:49 PM  
montex: Damn! Talk about a big pair of brass ones. Clearly, with bravery like that, he could not possibly be a Democrat

I doubt he's a Republican because he didn't credit any invisible friends with saving his life and the life of his passengers. Instead he credited his own training and practice.

Ya can't be a Republican anymore unless you are a christian don't ya' know...
 
2007-12-28 06:27:08 PM  
montex,
that was funny as hell! Some will be angry at you, but mostly because they're angry at everything and don't understand the joke.
In the future, try using the label for the physical condition that is designated by a yellow streak on the posterior:
'liberal'
The reason being so many folks consider themselved to be democrats, because mommy and daddy were. They aren't bad people,
just not accustomed to making decisions on their own.
 
2007-12-28 07:38:51 PM  
"No need to ask him twice to pay the Piper" I Lol'ed

The Piper Malibu is like a Cessna 172 about the same way a Acura MDX is like a Honda Accord.

Flaps are not operated by pedals. There's a small cage in the panel with hamsters in a wheel that you throw corn at when you need to increase your angle of decent without increasing your airspeed. If you need the flaps extended quickly, you ignite the corn first or throw in a cat.

I do wonder the effect on the glide without a windmilling prop.
 
2007-12-28 08:14:59 PM  
give me doughnuts: It reminded me of a cock-pit voice recording of a plane crash that I heard, once.
The pilot and co-pilot were totally calm, almost mechanical, trying one thing after the other to get the plane to work.
THe last thing on the tape was one of the guys saying, almost disgustedly, "shiat."
He sounded like he was pissed that they ran out of time to try things.
No fear, no panic, totally professional.


I've heard a few of these tapes and you're right. It's almost like it's an annoyance that the ground is interfering with what they are doing.
I heard on crew go through 10 minutes of knowing they were very farked but kept trying anyhow. The last words were a very heartfelt "Honey, I love you" and a resigned "Ah hell". The "ah hell" has always stuck with me. It's almost a calm, zen-like "oh look, I've run out of time" with the same tone I'd use for something is ready to be taken out of the oven. Very surreal, hangs in my brain for some reason.
 
2007-12-28 08:33:07 PM  
Bravo.
 
2007-12-28 11:17:18 PM  
Bomb Head Mohammed: I have suffered complete engine failures in aircraft in the air. Twice, to be exact

Bomb Head Mohammed: I have also had total vacuum failure while on an ILS in IMC (not a big deal at that point), and a few other interesting events (nosewheel that didn't lock in place, asymmetrical brake failure, noticing that a mechanic had installed aileron cables backward during pre-flight, radio and electrical failures, transponder failures, and so on). I'm fairly unlucky, statistically speaking, but these sorts of things happen to anybody who has flown small aircraft for a while.

Well, I think I qualify as someone thats flown small aircraft for awhile, and let me be the first to call you...

SHENANIGANS!
 
2007-12-28 11:45:32 PM  
Balls as big as.......

farm3.static.flickr.com
 
2007-12-29 01:14:08 AM  
Sweet bouncing Buddha on a trampoline... The Gimli Glider wiki produced some amazing pucker factor. It's gonna be another two hours before I can get my chair out from atwixt my asscheeks. BAD. ASS.

Mad props to the Colorado dude, though. (Errr, no pun intended...) One of my high school buddies went to flight school after we graduated, and some of his stories, though awesome, gave me the dancing heebie-jeebies. He had lots of the "oops, no engine! How are you going to land?" stories. Wish I could remember more of them. Next time we meet up I'm buying him a few beers while we swap stories. (Haven't seen him in a few years.)


mrshowrules
My dad told me that there were cargo aircraft in the military that when they were completely empty they could stay airbourne essentially motionless with a strong head wind

...Cargo aircraft? Are we talking C-130s and the like? I wanna call shenanigans, but I suppose anything's possible. The wings just look too stubby to provide enough lift to keep you from just falling out of the sky. Mostly 'cause I've watched a few of them take off, and it's impressive. At first you hear a noise. It's quiet, but you know it's a very big noise, and it's coming your way. As the plane rolls into view, you realize that the noise is the sound of air trying to frantically get the hell out of the way of something very big. As it takes off you realize that religion doesn't have sh*t on science, which has allowed us to create a metal behemoth that makes a bus look like a skateboard, and allow it to thumb its nose at the ground and make gravity its personal biatch for a little while.


MadAsshatter
He should've had this one riding shotgun.

That is awesome hair. I lol'd!
 
2007-12-29 04:11:18 AM  
Am I the only one who read the article description, saw the "Denver Post" image, then laughed?
 
2007-12-29 12:49:15 PM  
a C-130 seems like it has a pretty low stall speed for such a large aircraft, they are going less than a hundred when you jump and I'm sure the CASA is even better at low speed flight.
check it
 
2007-12-31 10:59:36 AM  
chairborne: a C-130 seems like it has a pretty low stall speed for such a large aircraft, they are going less than a hundred when you jump and I'm sure the CASA is even better at low speed flight.
check it


I'm talking early 1970's on a Canadian air force base and it was a prop cargo aircraft. I want to say "buffalo" but that doesn't seem right.
 
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