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(Denver Post)   Normally, when the propeller falls off of your single engine airplane over the Rocky Mountains, things don't end well. Then there's this guy   (denverpost.com) divider line 181
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34083 clicks; posted to Main » on 28 Dec 2007 at 6:36 AM (6 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2007-12-28 08:18:00 AM
Physics Geek: When I was taking flight lessons, my instructor made a point of pulling the throttle to idle at least once or twice a lesson, and announcing "Engine Failure, where are we going???" After I'd level out, establish best glide, and look around to find a flat-enough spot, I'd have seconds to plan approach, execute the approach, drop flaps if necessary, and keep the airplane at best-glide speed during the process. Since we were in "uncongested areas", the instructor would let the plane descend to at least 1000' AGL before announcing I had either blown the approach, or made a nice one-- then he'd close the throttle, and we'd climb back up.

Same instructor did this to another student? And the throttle cable stuck in the housing when he went to close the throttle. Student did NOT expect to land in a beanfield during a lesson

\and they still charged him for the hour on the airplane.

1000AGL? that was the normal pattern alt I trained at, my CFI pulled the power over the Eastern Shore of MD over beanfields, farms and whatnot and let us get down to 200ft or so with Full flaps before shoving the throttle back in! I appreciated the effort behind flying low & slow with all the drag and full power believe me!

I'm not even going to start telling what he did to me under the Hood, Unusual Attitudes indeed!
 
2007-12-28 08:34:51 AM
I would love to drink with this man.

/Balls of farking steal
 
2007-12-28 08:38:51 AM
Betacamman: give me doughnuts: LonMead: give me doughnuts: It reminded me of a cock-pit voice recording of a plane crash that I heard, once.
The pilot and co-pilot were totally calm, almost mechanical, trying one thing after the other to get the plane to work.
THe last thing on the tape was one of the guys saying, almost disgustedly, "shiat."
He sounded like he was pissed that they ran out of time to try things.
No fear, no panic, totally professional.

You're referring to the July 19, 1989 Sioux City crash.

For this guy, 1 life down, 8 to go.

I bet you totally kick ass at Trivial Pursuit.
*bows to sensei*

Unfortunately, he'd lose on that question:

The last word on the Sioux City recorder was "God"

However, "Aw, shiat" was the last heard on American Eagle Flight 4184, Oct. 31, 1984., and "shiat" was the last word on Air France 296Q on June 28, 1988

/and probably a lot of other flights
//The Black Box, by Malcolm MacPherson
///available at Amazon


*thumbs nose at LonMead, bows to new sensei*
 
2007-12-28 08:39:10 AM
But the question remains....can he take off without a propeller?
 
2007-12-28 08:40:43 AM
He's wasn't flying...he was falling, with style.
 
2007-12-28 08:44:33 AM
akindeathcloud: I would love to drink with this man.

/Balls of farking steal


Ladies and Gentlemen, I present to you the

*AMAZING TESTICLES OF THEFT*!
 
2007-12-28 08:45:15 AM
Chuck Norris is so badass, he doesn't need a propeller to land a plane; he commands the Earth to gently caress him to a soft landing.
 
2007-12-28 08:47:58 AM
dennysgod: He's wasn't flying...he was falling, with style.

*snort*

Winner.
 
2007-12-28 08:49:32 AM
Bomb Head Mohammed: I have a vacation home in Eastern Europe

LOL.
I bet you're getting a real kick out of these replies.
 
2007-12-28 08:49:58 AM
thespindrifter: Chuck Norris is so badass, he doesn't need a propeller to land a plane; he commands the Earth to gently caress him to a soft landing.

Bob Ross never flys or even walks to where he wants to go... he merely paints himself into reality.
 
2007-12-28 08:51:31 AM
It was better for him the entire prop came off right away. Had he thrown just one blade, the vibration might have wenched the engine out of it's mounts and unbalanced the plane.
 
2007-12-28 08:58:20 AM
I had no idea so many farkers were flyboys, thats interesting. With as many posts I'm sure that some are actually flyers...but I wonder which one(s) are subscribing the Internet Tough Guy Flying school.
 
2007-12-28 08:59:15 AM
If a good landing is one from which you can merely walk away, what superlative for the one from which you can stride magnificently?
 
d3
2007-12-28 09:03:29 AM
Bomb Head Mohammed:
And yes, for those of you who asked, indeed I have suffered complete engine failures in aircraft in the air. Twice, to be exact. Once in a twin with a single-engine cervice was 1000' above field elevation (which basically resulted in an extended power glide home), once in a single with a student in the pattern (normal landing - carbureor problem). I have a vacation home in Eastern Europe and while here for fun I fly Yak-52 aerobatically at a local field - here it is routine for the engines to cough and sputter due to fuel quality problems.

I have also had total vacuum failure while on an ILS in IMC (not a big deal at that point), and a few other interesting events (nosewheel that didn't lock in place, asymmetrical brake failure, noticing that a mechanic had installed aileron cables backward during pre-flight, radio and electrical failures, transponder failures, and so on). I'm fairly unlucky, statistically speaking, but these sorts of things happen to anybody who has flown small aircraft for a while.


I've had multiple cars and driven hundreds of thousands of miles. I have yet to experience anything equivalent to these types of mechanical failure (knocks wood). The water pump dying on my Buick didn't result in the need to take emergency action. Convince me that flying is safer again?


/Not flying with BHM and Murphy/Darwin any time soon. ;)
 
2007-12-28 09:08:08 AM
Yep.... good job... I understand that approaches into Aspen are a bit tricky, but never been there... I'm sure it's no fun at all after the prop has departed the aircraft!

My CFI regularly pulled the throttle and had me look for a field. He did it enough that I think about it all the time, which is the point, I suppose. Had one instructor do it in the pattern, midfield downwind when I was wide -- I don't fly such a sloppy pattern anymore!
 
2007-12-28 09:09:25 AM
d3:Convince me that flying is safer again?

I'm not a pilot, but I would hazard a guess that since @ 70% of all vehicular deaths are from multiple-car altercations, and since there are probably hundreds of times more cars on the road than planes in the sky, it is a simple matter of statistics-- not that many drunk pilots flying at you head on.

Sure, a mechanical failure on a plane is bad, but driving on a highway (say, I-75 through Atlanta) and your car dies dead in rush hour traffic? YEah, you're a goner there, too.

/Put some thought into it man!
 
2007-12-28 09:11:10 AM
*&^%$#@! Gorram italics! That's what I get for trying to clean up a quote!
 
2007-12-28 09:13:38 AM
I think the saying goes "a good landing is one from which you can walk away. After a great landing you can use the airplane again."
 
2007-12-28 09:18:04 AM
I suppose this may alter what eventually appears on his gravestone?

/impressed
 
2007-12-28 09:20:41 AM
gspazg: Chuck Norris?

No, this pilot is obviously a real person, whereas Chuck Norris isn't.
 
2007-12-28 09:24:20 AM
Bob Ross would have replaced the propeller with a Happy Little Tree and flown on to Japan.


Suspended at 16,000 feet in an airplane with no power, no propeller and motor oil streaming across the front windshield, 60-year-old Barry Cox remembered that panic wasn't going to do much good.


Much better then remembering, "Crap...I left the oven on!"
 
2007-12-28 09:25:01 AM
vort3xxx: I suppose this may alter what eventually appears on his gravestone?

Well yeah. The date, for one thing...
 
2007-12-28 09:27:29 AM
TFA: The Aspen man simply kept his eyes on the knot speed of his 1988 Piper Malibu, floating above the Roaring Fork Valley about 12 miles east of Aspen.

Are you farking kidding me? How about airspeed and gliding.
 
2007-12-28 09:29:06 AM
betacamman

wasn't there an Alaska Air incident many years back where a jackscrew failure caused the plane to fly upside-down. The pilot was recorded as "at least we're still flying!"

Although the plane did eventually crash, I think that guy deserves a "balls of steel" mention
 
2007-12-28 09:30:22 AM
What makes this astounding is that he went back to Aspen, an airport with one of the most-difficult approaches. It is a high-altitude airport with a mountain at one end and a runway with a 2% upslope.

How to Fly Dangerous Approaches (new window)
Aspen, CO
 
2007-12-28 09:31:46 AM
But did they have those little packets of pretzel's?

What happened to the pretzel's!!?!!?
 
2007-12-28 09:36:57 AM
He should've had this one riding shotgun.

teal-c.com
 
2007-12-28 09:38:55 AM
Tjack: "Even if you do have to make an off-field landing, most of those are successful," Cox said, minutes before going to a party Thursday evening in Aspen. "It is a little more difficult in the mountains than it would be in Kansas."

I like this guy.


"Yeah, we all amost died. Honey where's my tux?"
 
2007-12-28 09:39:40 AM
Wash: "Yeah well, if she doesn't give us some extra flow from the engine room to offset the burn through, this landing is gonna get pretty interesting."

Mal: "Define interesting."

Wash: "Oh god oh god we're all gonna die?"

Mal: "This is the captain. We have a...little problem with our engine sequence, so we may experience some slight turbulence and then...explode."

Mal: "Yeah well, just get us on the ground."

Wash: "That part will happen pretty definitely."



/"I'm a leaf on the wind-- watch me soar!"
 
2007-12-28 09:41:52 AM
thespindrifter: /"I'm a leaf on the wind-- watch me soar! KTHUNK!"

FTFY ;)
 
2007-12-28 09:51:24 AM
FTFA: Thousands of hours of piloting taught him that 90 knots (103.7 mph) is the perfect gliding speed. And without a functioning engine, achieving 90 knots is all about the balance of the nose of the plane.

Err, it says that in the pilot's manual.

Bomb Head Mohammed: You people are clueless, and that includes (especially) you bigKW.

THIS!

Pilots train for this kind of thing. It is a bread and butter emergency. I mean the prop coming off is pretty serious, but the action he took was trivial. Read any pilot's biography, and you will see these things are completely normal.

d3: I've had multiple cars and driven hundreds of thousands of miles. I have yet to experience anything equivalent to these types of mechanical failure (knocks wood). The water pump dying on my Buick didn't result in the need to take emergency action. Convince me that flying is safer again?

The reason that aircraft fail so often is due to a few things. One is the need for a low weight. Everything on a plane is as light as possible which comes at the cost of reliability. Another issue is the the requirement for aircraft to opperate at high throttle settings for extended periods, both in climb and in cruise. Cars rarely rarely perform so highly and for extended perids. Those that do, racecars for example, also have hight failure rates.
 
2007-12-28 09:53:54 AM
This guy deserves my account name more than I do.
 
2007-12-28 09:56:16 AM
PhysicsGeek Same instructor did this to another student? And the throttle cable stuck in the housing when he went to close the throttle. Student did NOT expect to land in a beanfield during a lesson

\and they still charged him for the hour on the airplane.

Why not, he learned a pretty good lesson that day, didn't he?


This.

If I were the student, I'd have cheerfully paid extra, for the "realism."
 
2007-12-28 09:56:22 AM
Jeez.
If these small planes are so safe, then why have several people on this board experienced some sort of catastrophic failure in one?

43 yrs old and I've NEVER had my engine in my car blow out, throw a rod, or even stall, while driving.


So, either they're not so safe, or the people here are lying about their experiences, or the laws of averages doesn't apply here.
 
2007-12-28 10:07:45 AM
Cancel_N_Identify: bigKW: Cancel_N_Identify,
You are an asshole. He pulled off a landing, whereas most would have panicked. Let's see you try something like that. JACKBAG

That is difference between the general public and those who hold pilot licenses. When you learn to fly you train for engine failures, and control your emotions. If you cannot do this you do not earn your pilot license. You better hope I can do this also because I might be the pilot of the next airline flight you take, it's what I do for a living. My comments were made from the perspectiv of an Airline Pilot.



We're generally in awe of what this guy mangaged to do. Your perspective is still appreciated, at least by me. Nevermind the trolls.

/Have seen Air Force One do a deep roll-turn during approach
//Send carpet cleaning bill to the pilot
 
2007-12-28 10:08:03 AM
IXI Jim IXI: thespindrifter: /"I'm a leaf on the wind-- watch me soar! KTHUNK!"

FTFY ;)


I always thought it was more like "*---HURK!*"

smartass ;p

He beat the Paramedics by a whole half hour!
 
2007-12-28 10:08:26 AM
FlukeBoy
Ever been in a car accident? Fender bender etc?

I'm far more scared to drive down a busy city street than I am flying.

Here's why:
-Safety is #1 priority at all times for everyone involved.

-Pilots/ATC are trained to be extremely professional and calm at all times. Ever during emergencies. Engine failures, Control problems, electrical failures are par for the course and no more frightening than getting a flat tire in a car. Weather is where the fear is at.

-All those involved with decision making are highly trained. A pilots license is much much much harder to get than a drivers license. Tends to weed out the morons. They still exist though.

So when the shiat hits the fan. The people who make the calls are going to make the right ones most of the time.

Keep in mind the conditions that light aircraft engines have to work in. Much more hostile than your normal car.
 
2007-12-28 10:12:16 AM
I'll go with Bomb Head Mohammed as far as not letting the situation get out of hand. Too much today the reaction to some calamity is the "OMGOMGOMG" mantra and things spiral rapidly downward from there.

Gimli Glider (new window)

Bob Hoover (new window)

F-15 landing with one wing (new window)

Any shuttle landing.

Of course, sometimes all the calm profesionalism in the world can't pull your arse out of the sling.

JAL 123 (new window)

Note that aircraft piston engines are not the same as auto engines. The crankshafts are under significantly more stress then their land-bound brethren, which is why there have been few successful conversions of the latter to the former.
 
2007-12-28 10:12:47 AM
give me doughnuts: It reminded me of a cock-pit voice recording of a plane crash that I heard, once.
LonMead: You're referring to the July 19, 1989 Sioux City crash.


Probably not, given doughnuts' description of "ran out of time to try things". In the Sioux City crash, the flight crew plus a passenger who was also a pilot did everything and then some to do the impossible - they nearly brought the aircraft in to a safe landing (were it not for suddenly catching the starboard wingtip on touchdown).

d3: Convince me that flying is safer again?

In flying you don't have some idiot tailgating you, or who isn't paying attention and rams into your backside.

In flying you don't have countless idiots yakking away on their cellphones while sipping their mochagrandefatfreelatte and aimlessly drifting into the side of your vehicle.

In flying you don't have some woman going 1/4 your speed because she's afraid to fly.
 
2007-12-28 10:14:02 AM
IdBeCrazyIf: thespindrifter: Chuck Norris is so badass, he doesn't need a propeller to land a plane; he commands the Earth to gently caress him to a soft landing.

Bob Ross never flys or even walks to where he wants to go... he merely paints himself into reality.


I lol'd!
 
2007-12-28 10:17:18 AM
d3: I've had multiple cars and driven hundreds of thousands of miles. I have yet to experience anything equivalent to these types of mechanical failure (knocks wood). The water pump dying on my Buick didn't result in the need to take emergency action. Convince me that flying is safer again?

oh

my

god
 
2007-12-28 10:18:11 AM
When I was taking lessons for my private pilots license the instructor would occasionally ask me "If the engine quit now, would you be able to make it back to the airport?"

One time, when I was getting close to my flight test, I responded "Let's find out." and killed the engine. The prop came to a dead stop in front of us, and he looked at me in shock for a few seconds, and then sat there to see what I'd do.

I made the airport, no problem.

He told me afterward "If I hadn't known your background I would have taken over."

/I'd had a glider license for several years.
//In fact, I was a glider instructor.
///Much more comfortable in the plane without that noisy engine
///I'm ALWAYS within gliding distance to landable terrain
 
2007-12-28 10:18:18 AM
Pilot lands Plane!! Amazing! Who would have thought a trained Pilot could land a plane without dieing, It must come as a shock to Farkers that a plane is capable of flight without a form of propulsion, lets hope to god you guys don't find out about gliders!
Seriously what do you expect, the guy to just give up in mid air or for him to spontaneously combust? Sure it's a good job but as a pilot it's what is expected of you. Downgrading balls of steel to Balls of pot metal.

/pilot
// taught to handle emergencies without brain exploding.
///Sudden CG change must have been fun though
 
2007-12-28 10:20:33 AM
www.weedhopperusa.net

Big deal.

I once made the Kessel Run in 12 parsecs.
 
2007-12-28 10:23:13 AM
thespindrifter: I always thought it was more like "*---HURK!*"

smartass ;p



heheheh...I'll have to do some research, but I don't think he even had time for the 'hurk'


 
2007-12-28 10:23:43 AM
SherKhan: The bad is now I have that damn The Beat Goes On/Switchin' to Glide stuck in my head.

Dayum...talk about your one hit wonders. Ahh, the Eighties. Lost in smoke. : /
 
2007-12-28 10:29:33 AM
Cancel_N_Identify: Doesn't like the idea of a V1 cut in the MU2

It's amazing what a GIS for MU 2 will get you..just sayin', it's NSFW.

http://www.beach-net.com/ochideout/mu2.jpg (pops)
 
2007-12-28 10:29:56 AM
FlukeBoy: Jeez.
If these small planes are so safe, then why have several people on this board experienced some sort of catastrophic failure in one?

43 yrs old and I've NEVER had my engine in my car blow out, throw a rod, or even stall, while driving.


So, either they're not so safe, or the people here are lying about their experiences, or the laws of averages doesn't apply here.


You dumbass...

The number of idiots+cars on the road vs. the number of aircraft+pilots in the sky. Statistically anything that flies wins by the numbers.

Inherently flying is by far safer than driving, however airplane accidents tend to be far more less forgiving.

Safety and flight training go hand in hand. While you are a student, instructors are responsible for your actions. Whereas, driving instructors don't really give a fark what you do after the several hour course, as long as you meet state standards and pass the test. My flight instructors always gave me little pep talks about safety and their own experiences. You could tell that they wanted to pass on a little bit of their own legacy.

///This guy rocks
//I'm hoping to be safe like that
/76 hours and counting
 
2007-12-28 10:40:18 AM
FTFA "Thousands of hours of piloting taught him that 90 knots (103.7 mph) is the perfect gliding speed."

FAIL! The Pilots Operating Handbook taught him that.

Mr Logo: Another issue is the the requirement for aircraft to opperate at high throttle settings for extended periods, both in climb and in cruise. Cars rarely rarely perform so highly and for extended perids. Those that do, racecars for example, also have hight failure rates.

FAIL! It's is better for an engine to operate at a constant speed than to accelerate/decelerate all the time. Comparing an aircraft engine to a racecar engine is pointless. Racecar engines try to produce as much power as possible. Aircraft engines are built to be reliable first, power output is secondary. A Nextel cup engine produces around 800 HP from 350 cubic inches = 2.28 HP per cubic inch. Continental IO-550 300HP from 550 cubic inches = .54 HP per cubic inch. Which engine do you think is going to live longer?

You did get the best glide speed though, so WIN! there.
 
2007-12-28 10:48:45 AM
Well this thread is pretty much over. Everything's been addressed, and at this point if anyone mentions car safety again it's just because they failed to read any of the other posts. We can just kindly conclude that the man deserved his pilot's license, and the media likes to dramatize things more than they bother to learn the right terminology for things.

Have a wonderful day, folks!
 
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