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(UPI)   Certain sections of New Orleans are not adequately protected from possible future flooding due to a miscalculation by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers   (upi.com) divider line 88
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3505 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Nov 2007 at 7:14 PM (6 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2007-11-17 09:11:00 PM
rpa: seriously, i was just expressing disbelief that, over 2 years later, we still have to talk about the hurricane because we haven't addressed the underlying problems that the city of new orleans had in dealing with it.

That's nothing... The great Corps just released the information to the areas around NOLA called base elevation that determines how high you MUST raise a house before building. Not like it was some big mystery; most people would just look at the water marks on everything in sight and build about 3 feet higher.

Unfortunately, that's not how the federal mandates work. People who started rebuilding in the past two years, but before the base elevation release now are left holding the bag. And now the calculations that they came out with are found to be wrong.

If I was the tinfoil hat type I would have to wonder about a conspiracy with the "drown 'em", "gas 'em" (fumes in the FEMA trailers), "keep 'em guessing" (about how high, when, and where to build) attitudes the feds seem to have.
 
2007-11-17 09:24:08 PM
rpa, you seem earnest enough, but you clearly haven't read anything about the storm. The "what went wrong" has been figured out several times over. If you want a good primer that's also an interesting read, The Storm by Professor Ivor van Heerden (the head of LSU's Hurricane Center) is a good start. We did figure out what went wrong, a million times over! The federally-funded, built, and guaranteed levee system that was assured to protect against a Category 3 storm and storm surge was badly designed, poorly built, and badly maintained. This was NOT the fault of New Orleans' government or citizens.

Ivor van Heerden, who wrote that book I just mentioned, was one of those people who warned us that this could've happened - but in that warning was an implicit and explicit indictment of the government responsible for this faulty levee system. Coincidentally, after the storm, Prof van Heerden headed his own scientific panel that eventually forced the Army Corps of Engineers to admit (which it did in 2006) that its faulty levee system was responsible for the lion's share of the flooding after Hurricane Katrina. This is what we would call "what went wrong." As van Heerden says, Katrina hit land as a strong Category ONE storm (or weak Cat 2, there's no bright line).

rpa, there's tons to read if you're really interested in learning what's gone wrong since then. Again, only a small bit of it can be blamed on city government, if only because SO little of the recovery effort is in city control! The Fed is in control because they're in control of the levee system. The initial promise to protect against a so-called "100-year storm" (which van Heerden, as you'd guess for a Danish guy into hurricanes, was very vocal in supporting) became a contingency plan. That contingency plan gave way to a contingency contingency plan which - I shiat you not - comprised the Federal government giving no-bid contracts to KBR to dump sandbags around the broken levees in 2006 in case the hurricane season had been strong.

Eventually, the Corps built physical 'floodwalls' about 10 feet high that got done around Winter 2006. But if you do the reading, you'll learn that part of the reason these levees failed was not because they weren't high - but because they weren't "low" enough, as it were. The pilings weren't driven beneath the sand. As you can guess, these physical floodwalls won't hold back the kinds of floods we saw with Katrina - it won't offer the Category 3 protection the government has promised New Orleans over the past 50 some-odd years.

Now, another tidbit for you to consider is that when we fault the Army Corps of Engineers, we're not talking about individual soldiers off fighting in Iraq or Afghanistan. We're talking about the civilian brass who run the Corps of Engineers. We're also talking about the no-bid contracts these douchebags give to private companies like KBR, Halliburton (not exaggerating - they own a HUGE warehouse there), and Blackwater to build nearly-useless bullshiat like those floodwalls, and do next to nothing to actually help people. And profit, profit, profit.

Individual cities are not supposed to be solely responsible for getting their citizens out when catastrophic (or seemingly-so) natural disasters are approaching. This wasn't New Orleans' plan to make. I will fault the now "Invisible Mayor" Nagin (a corporate crony whose most honorable job was for a cable company) for being too mentally handicapped and potentially bipolar to do anything but sit and stutter. I will also fault Governor Blanco, a massive and now thankfully deposed tool, for not forcing Bush's hand earlier. I'd say Blanco gave my fellow Democrats a bad name, but my fellow Democrats seem to be earning their awful names just fine on their own. But ultimately, the blame for the levees failing and most of the damage is solely upon the Federal government. The blame for the civilian response can be uneasily shared between federal, state, and local governments.

A side note: much has been made of the "abandoned school buses" as a straw man to say that Katrina and its aftereffects were Nagin's fault, but consider this - 90% of New Orleans' population was evacuated before the storm hit. The Governor's request for Bush to authorize FEMA to enter the surrounding Parishes in Louisiana was approved - but she also asked for them to enter the coastal areas (the ones that would obviously get hit), and Bush didn't authorize that until much later - surely the only mistake he's ever made before, ever. I'll also grant that coordination of transportation was poorly executed on the Governor's behalf - and again was out of the control of the moronic Mayor of New Orleans.

The Wiki on the political effects of Katrina is actually a good primer on all these issues. I'm not gonna mock you because you seem genuinely interested. But the jury is not only out, it's left town and found a nice hotel room elsewhere. The case is closed. It's just that the federal government will never have to take responsibility for the mistakes its made (and continues to make, as the original link testifies).
 
rpa
2007-11-17 09:25:13 PM
Dufus: If I was the tinfoil hat type I would have to wonder about a conspiracy with the "drown 'em", "gas 'em" (fumes in the FEMA trailers), "keep 'em guessing" (about how high, when, and where to build) attitudes the feds seem to have.

i've always been of the mind that it's good to CONSIDER the tinfoil hat theories, just not to take them too seriously.

/likes to keep everyone honest, you know.
 
2007-11-17 09:31:41 PM
rpa: i'm upset that we haven't already figured out what went wrong and fixed it

I feel the same way. Truthfully, disasters like this are a serious threat to hundreds if not thousands of cities across the county. Each of them for different reasons. When, not if it happens again, it could happen in NY city or LA any other group of cities that aren't prepared for something of that magnitude. Instead of trying to fix it, lets go invade another country or two and give huge tax breaks for those who already wipe their a$$ with $50 bills. No need to try to fix things or improve anything.
 
2007-11-17 09:32:06 PM
rpa: xBIGxEASYx: The current gov't in N.O. has been free of corruption. Whenever you see something regarding N.O. and corruption, it is from several years ago during the previous mayor's administration. Same goes for the governor.

As soon as any money started rolling in, it would attract the greedy politicians just like moths to a flame. The corruption would soon be back because anyplace you have a high density of either politicians or lawyers that is the end result.
 
2007-11-17 09:32:18 PM
rpa: Wanna hear something really nasty? The Fed told people in the Ninth Ward they "didn't need" flood protection in their homeowner's insurance because they were in federally guaranteed flood zones.

Snarky McFarkerson: I'm not sure what you mean. One of the myriad issues facing New Orleans now is that many people don't want to move back. They've established lives elsewhere. Places with firmer job markets and more stable (and affordable, ironically) housing markets. I think the question that should be asked is - why did New Orleans flood in the first place? Look to the organization that first diverted the Mississippi, narrowed the channel through the Delta, and played out their disastrous mathematical ignorance and strategic blunders since 1965 - the Army Corps of Engineers. Hope you read the same news I check, because I also read recently that the Corps admitted that its flood protection systems in most other major cities are woefully inadequate as well.

What I want to know is why others in this thread still complain about the laziness of a certain segment of New Orleans' old population, as though that somehow justifies the federal government's continued retardation of the recovery process and fault for the problems that allowed this widespread devastation of an American city to occur. Remember, folks: these idiots in the government get our tax money whether they do their jobs or not! That's a far more criminal thing, in my eyes.
 
2007-11-17 09:36:52 PM
immrlizard: Wait, you mean that America could actually lead by example? We'd have to have a Constitution with checks and balances in place in order to do that, though.

Benjimin_Dover: You say this as though the Federal Government giving no-bid contracts to KBR, Halliburton, and Blackwater to operate in New Orleans was somehow NOT corruption. At least we can build RICO cases against local cronies. Eddie Jordan, a local corrupt politician, is a nice example of that in action. If you're going to get a hole poked in you no matter what, would you rather someone chop off your head - or get thirty paper cuts? (No, the paper cuts aren't on your eyelids or balls.)
 
rpa
2007-11-17 09:39:19 PM
s00p3rm4n:

thanks for the references. i'm interested in learning more. i'll have to check out van Heerden's book. i've heard it referenced before but haven't had time to read it.

and for what it's worth, i know the "recovery" effort really isn't in the hands of the city.

i have friends in n.o.... and a lot of my opinions are undoubtedly biased by the stories and things that they have told me about new orleans (both pre- and post- katrina). so when i form my opinion about the competence of the local government, a lot of it is based on that information. the things that i've heard about the police dept alone make me sick. of course, when you pay a cop $10/hr... well, you get what you pay for.

mostly, the whole thing leaves me with a sense of disappointment with everyone. i mean, the whole thing was just mishandled and it's sad. it's obvious to me that, at some point, the federal government (via the army corps of engineers) promised something that ultimately was not delivered, and then fema promised something that they were unwilling or unable to deliver.

/p.s. you don't have to explain to me about how the corps works. that, i've had plenty of experience with. as i said, they are pragmatists. problem = "x", "y" solves problem "x" according to our initial, underfunded study, we did "y" (choosing a well-connected govenment contractor), ergo, no problem. no reason to verify that the work was done correctly, no forethought, no accountability because we did "y". what else do you want?
//never liked dealing with the army corps of engineers.
 
2007-11-17 09:45:06 PM
To all the dumbasses who are saying this was a ploy against brown people:

Lakeview was an upscale, young professional, and predominately white part of New Orleans. And dead people. A lot of the big cemetaries are in Lakeview. If anything this was a conspiracy against dead white people.
 
2007-11-17 09:49:30 PM
belhade: Most of the Netherlands is under sea level and they don't have these kinds of problems!

Then again they aren't directly in the path of most hurricanes.

Whose stupid idea was NO in the first place?


France... that explains a lot of things. Napoleonic law for one.
 
2007-11-17 09:51:04 PM
i194.photobucket.com

Don't worry.
We gots Brownie, Dub, and MAF54 on it!!!
 
2007-11-17 10:08:01 PM
It would also help if the Army Corps of Engineers wasn't always underfunded, they ask for X number of dollars to do something and they barely ever get it.
 
2007-11-17 10:11:23 PM
WhyteRaven74 - perhaps if we weren't so, ahem, cavalier in our international endeavors, this wouldn't be an issue.

Plus, if this Administration has taught us anything, it is that the Monied Stupid rarely become anything more than that. Our childrens do learn!
 
2007-11-17 10:15:31 PM
s00p3rm4n: perhaps if we weren't so, ahem, cavalier in our international endeavors, this wouldn't be an issue.

funding for the Corps has been for shiat for ages, there was stuff in the 60s they wanted to do and fix up that they never got the money for. Hell they can't even get money for studies a lot of the time. And it all just piles up, like all the bridges in the US that are in bad shape.
 
2007-11-17 10:20:49 PM
Jensaarai: There are plenty of other places in the world that are in low/below sea level areas, such as Denmark. This is not a problem for them, because they have sophisticated levees and locks that are well funded aren't in a hurricane prone geographic location. At all.

/FTFY
 
2007-11-17 10:32:54 PM
Ooh! A great article just came to my attention from Harry Shearer, linking to another article. Harry writes on the Huffington Post, but he's not nearly as virulently lefty as most of the folks on there - and his excellent, concise articles tend to discuss New Orleans and its relation with the Federal Government.

The opening line made me think of this discussion: "One of the questions most frequently asked by critics of the New Orleans recovery is 'what happened to all that Federal money?'"

Here is the article.

_______________________________________________________

WhyteRaven74: I'd go so far as to say we haven't made a legitimate incursion into another country's affairs since the 1950s. Afghanistan excepted (after 9/11, not the three or four other times before that we invaded them). The military industrial complex, and its ridiculous diversion of our national resources, its hijacking of our patriotism, and its profit at the expense of our infrastructure started just as Eisenhower was warning against its conception in his farewell address.

I think what we've both mentioned are symptoms of a unifying and completely permeated problem in our governments, corporations, employers, and society on all levels: the priority in this country has been defined as immediate profit for us and those who give us money, and to hell with the rest. Pair that with a refusal to consider any revision of that priority as anything but "cutting and running" and what's happening now, from Katrina to global warming to the WGA strike, starts to make some sense. I know, it sounds like I'm rehashing the Communist Manifesto, right? Jeez. Anyway, I definitely understand your point, but I see that point as a notch in a much larger and far more stupid bedpost... and in that bed, the boss is farking us all butt-ly, and we secretly have grown to love it.
 
2007-11-17 10:35:33 PM
defects
To all the dumbasses who are saying this was a ploy against brown people:

Lakeview was an upscale, young professional, and predominately white part of New Orleans. And dead people. A lot of the big cemetaries are in Lakeview. If anything this was a conspiracy against dead white people.


Get with the programmed you defects...

Katrina was clearly a racist storm spawned by George W Bush...
 
2007-11-17 10:35:49 PM
There are lots of cities looking for a place to dump their trash. We could make New Orleans a giant landfill for a few years. When it's ten feet or so above sea level we could build New2 Orleans.
 
2007-11-17 10:51:12 PM
Hey folks, New Orleans was built above sea level. An it wasn't JUST the levee system. The 17th St canal walls were breached. A lot of areas that were flooded were because of the canal. These were areas that wouldn't have been flooded.
 
2007-11-17 10:54:32 PM
s00p3rm4n:

Sorry, I should have been more specific. Mostly what I meant with that sentence is that more people than I expected have moved back, approximately 70% as of September (source (new window)).

Although this is a large part of my question, I also wonder what will happen in terms of political and social fallout. I imagine it will be a lot bigger than Katrina.

Sorry if this all seems like worthless mental masturbation to you, but one thing I like to do is think of "what would happen if..." scenarios in my head.
 
2007-11-17 10:56:08 PM
kilgorn: no one was saying that; go back to your troll cave. Console yourself with EL Fudge. (Mmm, EL Fudge.)

NakedApe: Um, funny you mention that. There are some places in New Orleans - just as in many major metropolitan areas - that reside on so-called SuperFund sites. In other words, former toxic waste burial dumps or landfills. You say that as a joke, but it's true. May even be true for where you live! (The third nipple is normal to have - right? Right?)
 
2007-11-17 10:58:31 PM
NakedApe for guv'na
 
2007-11-17 10:59:51 PM
Also the total erosion of the coastline could be at fault. New Orleans is supposed to border swamp for a few hundred miles isn't it?
 
2007-11-17 11:22:35 PM
It never ceases to amaze me how we continue to ignore history.

If people want to keep living there, build a damned Ark big enough to hold them all. It'd be a hell of a lot cheaper.
 
2007-11-17 11:32:43 PM
Aello Quote 2007-11-17 10:51:12 PM
Hey folks, New Orleans was built above sea level. An it wasn't JUST the levee system. The 17th St canal walls were breached. A lot of areas that were flooded were because of the canal. These were areas that wouldn't have been flooded.


Hey AELLO, the 17th St Canal IS at sea level!
Which is why, when it was breached, it flooded the pat of New Orleans which is BELOW SEA LEVEL!
 
2007-11-17 11:47:00 PM
And you live there? My grandma, mom and aunts were born and raised there. And I have spent a lot of time in South Louisiana.
 
2007-11-17 11:59:10 PM
s00p3rm4n: (do some research, the Fed told people in the Ninth Ward not to buy flood insurance because their property was federally guaranteed against flooding)?

I'll quibble a bit on this one point since I live extremely close to a flood prone area: The Fed doesn't tell people NOT to buy flood insurance. If the flood protection from the Federal government is deemed sufficient, all they tell homeowners is that flood insurance isn't required.

My house is about a half mile from the "worst case" edge of a federally protected and designated flood plain. Anything inside that edge is required to have flood insurance, but I am not. Do I? You bet your ass I do. I pay quite a bit for flood insurance just in case.

Other people have fallen into the same trap. Apparently a community in Sacramento is getting ready to make the same mistake (pops), although I cannot see how anyone could live somewhere that might possibly have catastrophic flooding and not buy flood insurance.

This is not to suggest that the residents of the Ninth Ward were completely at fault, just that it's good to step back and evaluate your own circumstances and act accordingly.
 
2007-11-18 12:08:05 AM
They'll probably care about it now that they threw out all the poor people, demolished their former homes and put up cookie-cutter developments and condos for white yuppies...
 
2007-11-18 12:52:30 AM
2+2=22

What? What you do you mean thats not correct? Oh wait, 2+2=5. Silly me.
 
2007-11-18 01:08:52 AM
nashBridges: s00p3rm4n: (do some research, the Fed told people in the Ninth Ward not to buy flood insurance because their property was federally guaranteed against flooding)?

I'll quibble a bit on this one point since I live extremely close to a flood prone area: The Fed doesn't tell people NOT to buy flood insurance. If the flood protection from the Federal government is deemed sufficient, all they tell homeowners is that flood insurance isn't required.

My house is about a half mile from the "worst case" edge of a federally protected and designated flood plain. Anything inside that edge is required to have flood insurance, but I am not. Do I? You bet your ass I do. I pay quite a bit for flood insurance just in case.

Other people have fallen into the same trap. Apparently a community in Sacramento is getting ready to make the same mistake (pops), although I cannot see how anyone could live somewhere that might possibly have catastrophic flooding and not buy flood insurance.

This is not to suggest that the residents of the Ninth Ward were completely at fault, just that it's good to step back and evaluate your own circumstances and act accordingly.


well, the government never MAKES you, what happens is that no lender will write a mortgage without flood insurance if you're in a flood A zone. I live in one of the areas of New Orleans that is NOT a flood A zone, and you better believe I have flood insurance (it's cheap, for one thing).

In the 9th Ward and other flooded areas, there were plenty of people who owned a home they'd inherited or where the mortgage had been paid off for years. With no lender making them get insurance, they were totally uninsured for the flood loss.
 
2007-11-18 01:52:55 AM
Afternoon_Delight: Here's a radical new idea: Why doesn't New Orleans take care of New Orleans?

Because they've been governed by people actively working against the state's interest for personal profit since reconstruction. Louisiana is the poster child of government corruption and uncaring management, and NO is the big city in Louisiana.

I'm sure the stadiums and horse racing tracks will be well-protected if we leave them to manage themselves (they always are), but history has basically shown that the feds need to step in for anything to the benefit of the actual citizens to be done.
 
2007-11-18 02:39:11 AM
Outlawtsar: REPEAT!

/heh


Exact same thing I was thinking.

/darn me and having a Bot run in WoW tonight
 
2007-11-18 03:03:22 AM
A man, a plan, 9 feet of water in the Big Easy.
 
2007-11-18 12:59:33 PM
s00p3rm4n: We're also talking about the no-bid contracts these douchebags give to private companies like KBR, Halliburton (not exaggerating - they own a HUGE warehouse there), and Blackwater to build nearly-useless bullshiat like those floodwalls, and do next to nothing to actually help people.

Blackwater Blackwater Blackwater, they seem to be the whipping boy as of late for everything, from gun confiscations in NOLA, to not building the levees properly.

Blackwater is a private security agency, they provide manpower and training on security related matters, they never roamed the streets of NOLA, and all the contracts they have been awarded had bidding of some sort, though not always the 6-18 month long normal bidding period. The only NOLA related federal contract that they got was for providing armed guards to FEMA facilities. They did get a couple of local contracts, and some local government work. But most of their presence in NOLA was delivery food, and water that they donated, and doing air rescues with a couple of helicopters from it's air fleet, again free of charge.

KBR did receive a contract from the Army Corps of Engineers, but it had a rather lengthy bidding process attached to it. And IIRC that contract had to do with an overflow refugee detention facilities for ICE, that COULD be used as housing after a Katrina like disaster. I don't see any mention of contracts having to do with the levees since Halliburton's and KBR's specialty is more oil, and international construction and delivery related.
 
2007-11-18 01:19:03 PM
uhm... if nobody'd build houses on the land below sea level then there'd be no flooding, right?

Haliburton is perfectly capable of building fifty foot tall forty five foot thick walls with triple bunker-skirt foundations if someone gives them enough money to triple-overcharge for the concrete, rebar an labor.
 
2007-11-18 01:45:04 PM
Don't criticize the Army Corps of Engineers. They're busy rebuilding Iraq to defend our freedoms.
 
2007-11-18 02:19:22 PM
Um, ShawnC1032, so the Blackwater trucks I saw when I was taking pictures all over the Lower 9th in Winter 2005 were just a joke? Shut your dick mouth.

And no, I'd love to see your facts for that. And there's a reason Blackwater's a whipping boy. It's a mercenary outfit for sick cowboys, receiving hundreds of millions of dollars that it funnels through foreign countries to shelter itself from paying taxes in America, and shooting innocent people with no culpability.

Seriously, you signed on somewhere on the internets to DEFEND KBR, Halliburton, and Blackwater? I'm farking impressed dude. Are you Dick Cheney?

Control_this: You heard about that dam they're about to let collapse, right? The one that's gonna kill 1 million Iraqis if it goes.

mama's_tasty_foods: Well, let's also consider that if you were the average Wardie, and your government told you, "Hey, don't spend money on this," you'd probably be willing to take that advice.

prjindigo: Nice punch line. But if our federal government's levee system had held strong at the level it had promised, "Katrina" wouldn't have been Katrina.
 
2007-11-18 09:20:52 PM
s00p3rm4n: Um, ShawnC1032, so the Blackwater trucks I saw when I was taking pictures all over the Lower 9th in Winter 2005 were just a joke? Shut your dick mouth.

It's likely you may have seen Blackwater trucks, but they weren't there in a law enforcement function, but on local contracts. There were a couple of companies that hired Blackwater to protect their facilities. IIRC even the City of New Orleans even contracted them to protect some of government buildings.

In one case Blackwater employees that were distributing good stopped the looting at a bar, the owner hired Blackwater on the spot to continue providing security until local law enforcement was able to bring order to the town.

Also the people that did contracted work in the US are different from the people that do foreign work, Blackwater requires it's contractors for US based work to hold a law enforcement certificate (current, or expired recently).

The one Federal security contract that Blackwater was awarded was for security of new FEMA facilities opened to handle Katrina refugees across the country. It didn't have a traditional bidding process, but the FPS called agencies that had current GSA approval and asked for quotes.

Only two agencies could provide the man power, and Blackwater was the cheapest of the two.

And no, I'd love to see your facts for that. And there's a reason Blackwater's a whipping boy. It's a mercenary outfit for sick cowboys, receiving hundreds of millions of dollars that it funnels through foreign countries to shelter itself from paying taxes in America, and shooting innocent people with no culpability.

Sick cowboys, Blackwater has looser ROEs because of their mission, they aren't traditional military that roll in with air support, armor support, and in armored vehicles, they operate as small teams protecting people that they are asked to by the State Department, or employees of companies contracted by the US Government to provide services.

To date Iraq, no Blackwater protected facility has been compromised, nor has any of their principals (people they are assigned to protect) been seriously injured or killed. No other agency in Iraq can make that claim. I also would take the accounts of many civilians deaths with a grain of salt, Blackwater mainly runs protective details, their main mission is to get their principal and then themselves out of the area, so often the bodies aren't recovered by Iraqi authorities until hours after the shooting happened, it doesn't take more then a few minutes to pull a rifle and spare magazines off the person.

Oh I didn't sign up to defend Blackwater and Halliburton. I just don't see where you can blame them in NOLA. I don't see any contracts by the USACE relating to the levees for either Halliburton nor KBR on any of the official sources. The only domestic contract for KBR that could remotely be considered related to Katrina was the refugee facility I noted.

Halliburton and Blackwater are unique companies. Blackwater started as a training company, that decided to start it's own security force after requests from customers to provide their instructors to do security work.

Halliburton is one of the few companies that facilities government contracts. Most companies don't want to even touch a government contract with a 10ft pole, too much work on the bidding process, and later rebidding every couple of years, too much paperwork and audits while doing the work. Halliburton built itself around providing these services on a national level to the government.

If the government was easier to work with, companies like Halliburton wouldn't get much domestic work, but it isn't. As an example if you come early and under budget, the government (in particular the DOD) will not pat you on the back and say "good job." They will say "Why did you bid so high?" and investigate you to see if you cut any corners.

In addition to filling niche roles for the government, they are also unique in that they can provide man power with unique skill sets, on short notice, anywhere in the world. In Afghanistan where they didn't go to companies that had a good track record in the past (like KBR and Halliburton), many of the projects are a year or more behind schedule simply because the company didn't have assets in place to start the project on the contracted date.

Now tax shelter, I don't know how they could possibly be a tax shelter, many of their contracts are from the USACE or the State Department which means that they are taxed according to the rules set forth by the Federal government.

If you don't like them elect new members of congress and have the rules changed. As far as Halliburton moving a headquarters overseas, I have no problem with it, as long as the money if from contracts overseas they shouldn't be taxed for it until the money makes it way to the US, either into the parent corporation or through shareholders bring the money into US accounts. As long as the money doesn't enter the US, the US doesn't have any right to tax it.

Anyways this attitude is the reason that so few commercial ships bear the US Flag anymore. Merchant Marine rules that went way beyond what is demanded by 99% of the rest of the world requires crippled US shipping.
 
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