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(IndyStar)   "It's almost a no-brainer" comments police chief on the use of tracking devices to locate Alzheimers sufferers. Good choice of words there, chief   (indystar.com ) divider line
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1370 clicks; posted to Main » on 31 Oct 2007 at 9:47 AM (9 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



41 Comments     (+0 »)
 
 
OXO
2007-10-31 08:26:40 AM  
Senilojacktm
 
2007-10-31 08:39:22 AM  
"It's almost a no-brainer," Mercer said. "You have to do it."
"It will bring peace
piece of mind to families," said Della Turnbill, a facilitator for the Alzheimer's Caregiver Support Group in Greenfield.

This is a hoax story, right?
 
2007-10-31 09:50:25 AM  
Can we give them ear tags and paint a big number on their shirts while we are at it?
 
2007-10-31 09:55:24 AM  
A doctor says to his patient, "I'm sorry to tell you this. But you have cancer, and you have Alzheimer's."

And the patient says, "Well...at least I don't have cancer."


/cue rim shot
 
2007-10-31 09:57:42 AM  
I have Alzheimers so I'm really getting a kick out of...
Uh, what were we talking about?
 
2007-10-31 09:59:34 AM  
I can't see any reason this couldn't work for the blind also.
 
2007-10-31 10:04:39 AM  
I have an easier solution... carousel.
 
2007-10-31 10:06:14 AM  
Doctor: Sir, I'm afraid you have cancer AND Alzheimer's Disease.

Patient: At least I don't have cancer!
 
2007-10-31 10:11:17 AM  
Does it also keep them from stealing batteries?
 
2007-10-31 10:12:39 AM  
Remember November is Alzheimer's Awareness...where's my pudding?
 
2007-10-31 10:13:31 AM  
Oh, I heard a good one:

A guy goes to the doctor and the doctor tells him he has Alzheimer's and a...

huh?

Who submitted this crappy post?
 
2007-10-31 10:14:45 AM  
UrinalPooper: I have an easier solution... carousel.

Agreed. There is no sanctuary.
 
2007-10-31 10:14:55 AM  
A guy takes his elderly wife to the doctor. After a lengthy exam he meets the husband and says, "I have bad news. Your wife either has Alzheimer's or AIDS. I can't be sure."

Hubby replies, "What do you suggest I do?"

The doctor says, "Drop her off a few blocks from the house. If she finds her way home, don't sleep with her!
 
2007-10-31 10:18:06 AM  
My Dad's dealing with Teh Alzies. The "good" side is that he's largely immobile due to a hip injury earlier this year, so we don't need to track him.
 
2007-10-31 10:20:47 AM  
Repeat Man!!!: UrinalPooper: I have an easier solution... carousel.

Agreed. There is no sanctuary.


Who's on rotation?
 
2007-10-31 10:22:09 AM  
Quiet Lou, or I'll bust you back down to sergeant so fast it'll make your head spin!
 
2007-10-31 10:24:39 AM  
i thought GPSs are passive devices?
 
2007-10-31 10:30:50 AM  
Friar Simon: A doctor says to his patient, "I'm sorry to tell you this. But you have cancer, and you have Alzheimer's."

And the patient says, "Well...at least I don't have cancer."


/cue rim shot


My most favorite joke ever.
 
2007-10-31 10:30:52 AM  
Ahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh! This is how it starts...the mark of the beast! Someone get Bevets on the case.
 
2007-10-31 10:32:18 AM  
i26.photobucket.com
 
2007-10-31 10:38:00 AM  
This practice is used by Nursing Homes across the country. Their system uses something more like anti-theft devices that sound an alarm if they try to go outside. For people that are trying to take care of a patient at home, it only takes a bathroom break for a patient to pull together enough clarity to get out and quickly wander away. A friend of mine lost her mother to this, after she got lost in the woods and died of exposure. I do not think this should be mandatory, but it is a good idea.
 
2007-10-31 10:43:50 AM  
The Police Chief really needs to work on his speech writing skills.
 
2007-10-31 10:45:08 AM  
The best part of having Alzheimer's is being able to hide your own Easter eggs.
 
2007-10-31 10:53:57 AM  
More_Like_A_Stain: The Police Chief really needs to work on his speech writing skills.

Don't take this the wrong way, but assuming itw as one or the other; would you prefer a Chief of Police who can give eloquent speeces, or one good at, you know, catching criminals?
 
2007-10-31 10:54:52 AM  
Wow... so many typos there... I swear I had preview on.

\"it was" and "speeches
 
2007-10-31 11:00:34 AM  
MCStymie My Dad's dealing with Teh Alzies. The "good" side is that he's largely immobile due to a hip injury earlier this year, so we don't need to track him.

My sympathies. Mind the bedsores, they may kill him long before anything else.

This is a pretty good idea, as Alzheimer's patients tend to stroll. Not fun when you find them bloodied and missing a shoe, with no idea how they got where they are and the person living with them didn't even know they left.
 
2007-10-31 11:08:30 AM  
Hey, I figure if you're gonna have family with it, you might as well learn to laugh about it:
img475.imageshack.us
 
2007-10-31 11:18:10 AM  
Oh yeah chip grammy because she has dementia, chip your kids because they're in constant danger. Get yourself chipped while you're at it because the government knows best and wants to watch over you for your own good.

/slippery slope folks.
//No tinfoil hat here.
///Just sitting back and watching it all go to hell. (figuratively)
 
2007-10-31 11:21:15 AM  
I have half a mind to get one of those...
 
2007-10-31 11:53:56 AM  
Wow. My hometown finally made the front page of Fark, and this was the best we could do? I'm so...proud ashamed.

/We're not all that stupid
//No, really, I promise
 
2007-10-31 11:54:14 AM  
It's almost a no-brainer," Mercer said.

www.agavemedia.no

This is an insult to Demented-Americans!
 
2007-10-31 11:58:13 AM  
This is utterly ridiculous! Surely you could just tie them to a heavy object.
 
2007-10-31 12:00:06 PM  
So why do these units cost so much? My Boomerang vehicle tracking device is only $500 or so (plus monitoring fee). Admittedly these are probably smaller for better human portability, but $6500? I guess there's just not the volume demand (yet).
 
2007-10-31 12:08:54 PM  
Duck_of_Doom: MCStymie My Dad's dealing with Teh Alzies. The "good" side is that he's largely immobile due to a hip injury earlier this year, so we don't need to track him.

My sympathies. Mind the bedsores, they may kill him long before anything else.

This is a pretty good idea, as Alzheimer's patients tend to stroll. Not fun when you find them bloodied and missing a shoe, with no idea how they got where they are and the person living with them didn't even know they left.


Thanks for your sympathies. As it turns out, we have a full-time home care chick move Dad around, and we (his kids) take care of him on weekends. Only recently has he become a true "rag doll", as it were, so we put more emphasis on moving him about.

He could stand to lose a little weight, but that's a'ight.

For those Alzies folks what can move about, tracking is an excellent idea. There is not a thing dehumanizing about it; the person in that body is most often nowhere to be found in any event.
 
2007-10-31 12:20:17 PM  
clanque:

This is a hoax story, right?

No, it isn't. Slashdot recently had an article about Project Lifesaver, which uses RF transmitters to track people who wander. The next generation will use RGPS and cell phone technology to create a faster and safer tracking system.

When people who wander go wandering, they just GO. They don't put on a jacket, they don't bring food or water, and they don't have any idea where to go or even how (or if) they should get out of the cold. How long do you think you'd live if you went outside, right now, wearing just what you're wearing while you're sitting at your desk? Two days? Overnight? Maybe.

These folks require help when they get lost, and they have to get it fast. Project Lifesaver (new window) has a 100% success rate in recovering your loved ones and bringing them home safely.

For those who think that you can surreptitiously sneak one onto someone, the transmitter is much larger than a watch. Unlike 24, you can't just put a pencil-eraser-sized disk on someone and have it work. RFID tags used in store inventories require a special receiver which provides power through induction. (I am saying this because when I said this on /., people said, YOU SUK RFID! conspiracy!) It's not about putting the mark of the beast on someone, it's not about invading privacy, it's about using the tools we have right now to keep your loved ones safe.

But what do I know? I'm just the guy who wrote the code that went into the first-generation (RF only) transmitters.
 
2007-10-31 12:29:51 PM  
I was going to say something but I forgot.

I have nothing to contribute to this thread.
 
2007-10-31 12:31:44 PM  
GoldDude: So why do these units cost so much? My Boomerang vehicle tracking device is only $500 or so (plus monitoring fee). Admittedly these are probably smaller for better human portability, but $6500? I guess there's just not the volume demand (yet).

If you want to put a tracker on a vehicle, there's gobs of room, weight, and power. You can put a satellite transmitter (about the size of a smoke detector) on it, and you won't care. Hook it up to the 12V supply, draw an amp to transmit, and you're ready to go. The whole thing will weigh about 5-10 pounds, and that's basically nothing compared to what the vehicle can handle.

Now, if you want to have something that you can wear on your wrist and still be reachable up to 20km* away, you can't go with the same tech. You've got to go with smaller resistors, processors, and other components. The antenna isn't going to allow a smaller size, so that's got to be wrapped up in the transmitter in just that very special way.

Then you have to couple it with a dedicated, proprietary receiver. The ones for Project Lifesaver have a 150dB gain. (That's a minimum, and each one is tested before it goes out.) You could probably go with an COTS Radio Shack special, but it won't have the same gain. That means you won't get the same range.

They're also made in North America by people who actually care, and they are guaranteed to work. If your car tracker fails, your insurance company buys you a new car. If your personal tracker fails, the end result could be a fatality.

*depending on ambient conditions, terrain, angles, LOS, RF voodoo, etc.
 
2007-10-31 12:38:30 PM  
Just tape them to the bed.

Disclaimer: My dad was diagnosed with Alzheimers 4 years ago and he's also bedfast because of a severe stroke. My morbid sense of humor still goes on though.
 
2007-10-31 12:42:13 PM  
Dammit. I meant to add the following helpful bit.

This is a great idea. Before dad's stroke he was still quite active and indeed still did a bit of driving around town, though mom had pretty much put an end to that. It'd be great if there were an easy way to locate a dementia patient once they've wandered off.

And for those who think it'd be easy to keep them from wandering, try this little mental exercise: Keep your eye on a physically strong and active adult, 24 hours a day, every day. You don't get to shower, you toilet with the door open and sleep becomes problematic. Even in my fathers fully staffed nursing home someone can wander off a couple times before they get "tagged".
 
2007-10-31 01:24:34 PM  
so theMagni what you're saying is that you worked on this project and you're really getting a kick out of these replies...

I agree, it sounds like a good idea for someone who wanders off without planning or notice. If family and/or the caregivers agree that this is best for a patient, it keeps them safe but maybe a little more self reliant. If they don't have to be penned up so much maybe they can enjoy their lives more? They're not always vacant, but it could happen anytime.

/Lost a grandmother-in-law to Alzheimers.. In the end she didn't know her own home.
 
2007-10-31 04:33:00 PM  
Duck_of_Doom: My sympathies. Mind the bedsores, they may kill him long before anything else.

This is a pretty good idea, as Alzheimer's patients tend to stroll. Not fun when you find them bloodied and missing a shoe, with no idea how they got where they are and the person living with them didn't even know they left.


Bedsores killed the index patient for Alzheimer's back in 1906, and are still pretty common for a cause of death.
 
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