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(International Herald Tribune)   While most of the American army showed up for WWII just two years late, this plane will arrive 65 years late   ( iht.com) divider line
    More: Interesting  
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16019 clicks; posted to Main » on 24 Jun 2007 at 5:28 AM (9 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2007-06-24 04:00:36 AM  
submitter: While most of the American army showed up for WWII just two years late, this plane will arrive 65 years late

Maybe we shouldn't have shown up at all, eh, smitty?
 
2007-06-24 05:01:53 AM  
ComicBookGuy: Maybe we shouldn't have shown up at all, eh, smitty?

Okay, we have a new oldest farker. Where did you serve?
 
2007-06-24 05:48:23 AM  
While most of the British army showed up too early and then remedied this error at Dunkirk.
 
2007-06-24 05:51:43 AM  
cool story. But, fastest plane? Undoubtedly, it was the fastest Allied plane at over 400mph.

Didn't the Luftwaffe's Me-262 twin-jet turbine fighter go faster?

From Wiki, the Messerschmitt's max speed is 541 mph.

hmmmm
 
2007-06-24 06:00:58 AM  
I love the smell of flamewar in the morning!
 
2007-06-24 06:02:39 AM  
Egon Spengler
cool story. But, fastest plane? Undoubtedly, it was the fastest Allied plane at over 400mph.

I dunno about that, the De havilland Mosquito was right there with the Lightning in top speed.
 
2007-06-24 06:07:39 AM  
Methinks submitard is a britard.

/Seriously, you guys are okay in my book.
//At least you aren't French.
///Nothing good comes after the french...
 
2007-06-24 06:14:38 AM  
The Me-262 also went into service well after the P-38. So, at one time, the P-38 *was* fastest.

The P-38 also didn't self destruct practically every time out, either. Having to constantly swap engines out is a problem when your manufacturing and transport infrastructure keeps getting bombed all to hell and back.
 
2007-06-24 06:15:41 AM  
Why is it that when WWII is discussed, the Pacific theater is completely ignored?
 
2007-06-24 06:17:40 AM  
Egon Spengler: Didn't the Luftwaffe's Me-262 twin-jet turbine fighter go faster?

It did. Nothing was faster than the Me-262 during the war. A small correction would be that the P-38 is/was one of the fastest piston-engined aircraft on the planet.

The fastest prop plane in WWII was the Dornier Do-335 "Pfeil" (Arrow), but as only a dozen or so ever made it into service it doesn't count for much. I'd say the fastest prop in service in larger numbers would be the Vought F4U Corsair with a top speed of 446 mph.
 
2007-06-24 06:19:11 AM  
A fine example of one of Kelly Johnson's plethora of record ripping aeroplanes.
 
2007-06-24 06:21:49 AM  
No love for Mosquitoes here? The Mosquito is listed in Wikipedia as a whole MPH faster than the Lightning.
 
2007-06-24 06:22:15 AM  
Fark all of you. The old girl deserves a trip.

/who cares what the story says, nice to see her flying.
 
2007-06-24 06:25:46 AM  
Kelly Johnson ??,....wasn't this an offshoot of a Howard Hughes design. I always thought the P-38 came out of the type of plane that Hughes crashed in LA and was almost killed in. Kelly Johnson took the idea, doubled the engines and ran with it. Maybe I'm wrong.
 
2007-06-24 06:28:21 AM  
The de Havilland Mosquito, a fighter-bomber with a wooden frame for rapid strafe/bomb runs was indeed fast, clocking (again, Wiki) 415 mph.

There's a quote from Luftwaffe head honcho Goering, in a moment of exasperation:

"In 1940 I could at least fly as far as Glasgow in most of my aircraft, but not now! It makes me furious when I see the Mosquito. I turn green and yellow with envy.

The British, who can afford aluminium better than we can, knock together a beautiful wooden aircraft that every piano factory over there is building, and they give it a speed which they have now increased yet again. What do you make of that?"


- Hermann Göring, January 1943
 
2007-06-24 06:34:05 AM  
I have the Mosquito listed at 386 mph. May need to update that.
 
2007-06-24 06:35:03 AM  
What a waste of resources!

/Scrap it.
 
2007-06-24 06:35:47 AM  
MedicDance 2007-06-24 06:15:41 AM
Why is it that when WWII is discussed, the Pacific theater is completely ignored?
-----------
It's not. if you start talking about things that happen in the PT, people will stay on that side.. We almost treat the two front war as two different wars.

However, you almost never hear about the african campaign. even when speaking of the ET.
 
2007-06-24 06:38:44 AM  
True about the Afican SwingDancer, and it did so much for the generals.
 
2007-06-24 06:42:09 AM  

To be fair, the article says it was "one of the fastest"...

My grandfather was a mechanic in the Pacific, taking care of P-38s and F-6 Wildcats. Many years later, his Alzheimer's made it difficult to keep track of him. My uncle resorted to removing parts from the engine of his car to keep him from wandering around disoriented in Los Angeles. Having had to be so resourceful in maintaining fighter aircraft, he developed a MacGuyver-like ability to scrounge or fabricate parts to get the car running again. He earned himself a spot in an assisted living apartment complex by making his own spark plugs out of stuff laying around the garage.

Cool plane, cool story.

 
2007-06-24 06:43:12 AM  
Holy crap.

How many of you farkers were actually in the WWII?

We like to dish it out to other countries, but apparently we sure as hell can't take a joke.
 
2007-06-24 06:46:35 AM  
Dumle:
The fastest prop plane in WWII was the Dornier Do-335 "Pfeil"

True. 474 mph.

Among allied aircraft,the Grumman F7F Tigercat went 460 mph and carried 4 20mm cannon and 4 .50 calibre Browning machine guns. The de Havilland DH 103 "Hornet" ( a Mosquito derivative with handed 4-bladed props) was capable of 472 mph, with comparable armament. Both aircraft, while delivered in 1944, did not see combat service.
 
2007-06-24 06:47:09 AM  
A less mentioned and critical role of P38s was in photography.

The Pacific theater was desperate for every P38 it could get. Dick Bong was America's biggest ace of the war there in one with 40 credited kills. On August 6, 1945 his P-80 malfunctioned just after take-off, and while he bailed out, he never had a chance. The Bong Recreation Area was so named in his honor.
 
2007-06-24 06:47:35 AM  
LowbrowDeluxe, you're so right. Those damn French ruin everything! Thanks to them there's this annoying union of states that now won't stop farking around with shiat across the globe. If only they let england finish the job on those cheeky colonialists. Oh and don't get me started on that statue of liberty they made. What an eyesore!
 
2007-06-24 06:51:41 AM  
Whether a Lightning or Mosquito is faster is going to depend on model, trim, and altitude. There was quite a bit of variation.
 
2007-06-24 06:52:41 AM  
I just found an interesting bit of top speed WWII propeller fighter trivia.

The P-47M was a more conservative attempt to come up with a higher-performance version of the Thunderbolt. Four P-47D-27-RE airframes (s/n 42-27385 / 42-27388) were modified into prototype YP-47Ms by fitting the R-2800-57(C) engine and the GE CH-5 turbo-supercharger. The YP-47M had a top speed of 410 knots (473 mph, 761 km/h) and it was put into limited production with 130 (sufficient for one group) built. However, the type suffered serious teething problems in the field due to the highly-tuned engine, and by the time the bugs were worked out, the war in Europe was nearly over. All 130 were delivered to the 56th Fighter Group, and were responsible for all four of that group's jet shoot-downs. Joe Baugher's site lists 12 that were lost in operational crashes in Europe with the 56th Group (two after VE Day), and two (44-21134 on 13 April 1945 and 44-21230 on 16 April 1945) were shot down in combat, both by ground fire.


I had no clue they pushed jugs that fast during the war.
 
2007-06-24 06:58:02 AM  
Aeroplanes - bah!

"Timmy, ...
have you ever seen a grown man naked??
 
2007-06-24 06:58:26 AM  
Dick Bong? I'm sorry to interrupt the otherwise engrossing subject of WWII air combat, but LOL.


I sure he was ACE at smoking the competition.
 
2007-06-24 06:59:21 AM  
The Lost Squadron was part of a daring plan that eventually brought hundreds of U.S. fighter jets and bombers to England via Canada, Greenland and Iceland in the early months after America's entry into World War II.

Good job Associated Press.
 
2007-06-24 07:15:23 AM  
The P-47 Thunderbolt was the first propeller-driven plane to break 500 mph. I have that in one of those "All about the Fighter" softback books they sell at Wright-Patterson AFB in Dayton, OH.

If you haven't been, you should go if you're any kind of fighter buff. I spent two long (joyous!) days there and still didn't see everything.

I remember reading about the Lost Squadron. The icepack was so thick over the planes that it had crushed them. I can't imagine how much work it took to put this one back together. I wonder if any of the bombers will be re-constructed?

CS
 
2007-06-24 07:15:40 AM  
etv_2k: What a waste of resources!

/Scrap it.


It's NEVER a waste of resources to restore a classic aircraft.

Lend-lease, anyone?
http://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/UN/UK/UK-Civil-WarEcon/UK-Civil-WarEc​o​n-9.html
 
2007-06-24 07:30:11 AM  
Link to a more detailed article about Glacier Girl's mission / recovery / flight here (pops) with picture of original pilot.
 
2007-06-24 07:30:34 AM  
Maybe we shouldn't have shown up at all, eh, smitty?

Someone's still got some of the sands of Iwo Jima stuck in their vagina.
 
2007-06-24 07:34:18 AM  
Tweeker

The Bong Recreation Area was so named in his honor.

And when I took a trip up Wisconsin, I pointed and laughed at the sign. In both directions. (I had no sleep that weekend...)

I also point and laugh at the Stoney Creek exit on the Ohio Turnpike (Rt. 420).

Hell, I even point and laugh at the "Mad River" signs when I drive through Dayton on a regular basis...


/mad river, yo
 
2007-06-24 07:41:05 AM  
Liquid_Silver

Glad to find a fellow subscriber to this particular school of thought, my friend. You and I, we understand why the Americans dislike the French so much... if it weren't for the French, they would still be British. That must really sting.

/anyone dumb enough to not see the humourous intent deserves to be offended
 
GBB
2007-06-24 07:47:50 AM  
http://www.iht.com/articles/2007/06/22/sports/plane.php

Sports??? that's where they filed this story??? rly??
 
2007-06-24 07:49:20 AM  
I usually come here to say really cynical jackass type stuff, but I just wanted to say that the story of this plane really is a very cool.

A bunch of rich egotistical jackasses dig up an incredibly rare plane out of the middle of a farking glacier, and restore it's crushed shell to flying condition.

One of the Discovery/History/National Geographic networks did a docmentary of it. I'm sure they'll trot it out now that it's in the news.
 
2007-06-24 08:00:32 AM  
 
2007-06-24 08:11:53 AM  
did they mention "jets" and WWII in the same sentence?
wow.
 
2007-06-24 08:14:41 AM  
baka-san

Fark all of you. The old girl deserves a trip.

She sure does.

Grateful so many of her sisters made it ....
 
2007-06-24 08:29:44 AM  
Very cool.

Viva War!
 
2007-06-24 08:32:51 AM  
Okay, sure, rub the whole 'Paid for your revolution' thing in my face. Tell me this, though. How stupid do you have to be to make a giant statue that's going to sit in the middle of a harbor, out of a material that oxidizes into such an ugly color? No wonder they were giving it away!
 
2007-06-24 08:41:38 AM  
invisbob: did they mention "jets" and WWII in the same sentence?
upload.wikimedia.org

Quite a few pilots may have managed to push their aircraft close to the Sound barrier, particularly in high altitude dives.
 
2007-06-24 08:42:07 AM  
TimBilly

One of the Discovery/History/National Geographic networks did a docmentary of it. I'm sure they'll trot it out now that it's in the news.

This one too?

I only remember the one about the bomber that was abandoned on some frozen wasteland somewhere, and due to some mishap it bruend to the ground just as they were getting ready to fly it to an airport after making *very* extensive and expensive field-repairs over the space of a few years.
 
2007-06-24 08:48:52 AM  
Quite a few pilots may have managed to push their aircraft close to the Sound barrier, particularly in high altitude dives.

Yeah, but the first straight-wing jet to do it was the CF-100 "Clunk" Canuck.
 
2007-06-24 08:51:20 AM  
I should probably read the other posts in this thread first, but...

Submitter:
The armed forces of the United States are for the defense of the United States. The desire of other countries to have our military fight their wars for them in no way obligates us to do so.

With the benefit of hindsight, the U.S. should have concentrated on attacking and defeating Japan, with aid to the European theater limited to lend-lease, until such time as Japan was defeated. At that point, this country could have re-evaluated the situtation, and decided that events warranted actually sending troops into battle, but it should have been based solely on the best interests of the United States, rather than the best interests of Britain, France, or the Soviet Union.
 
2007-06-24 08:54:11 AM  
LowbrowDeluxe: How stupid do you have to be to make a giant statue that's going to sit in the middle of a harbor, out of a material that oxidizes into such an ugly color?

Personally, I think the green tinge is part of the charm. It is what it is and I think it looks great.

BTW, did you know there's a smaller version in France, and IIRC it has one of its boobs out! I guess they figured the Americans wouldn't be so into that. Now THAT would have been cool.

As for you lot joining the war late, hell, you were trying your damndest to be neutral, which in some cases wasn't a bad idea (might be an idea to go back that way TBH), but you joined when it got out of hand. Personally I think the sacrifices made at D-Day and beyond more than made up for it. Thanks Yanks!

And let's not forget the guys who risked prosecution back home to come over and join the RAF before you officially joined the war as a nation.

I have my issues with America, but on the whole shiate balanced out and the correct resolution was acheived.

Cheers!
 
2007-06-24 08:56:34 AM  
AaaPha: I guess they figured the Americans wouldn't be so into that.

Ashcroft would have thrown a wobbler over that, I think.
 
2007-06-24 09:01:19 AM  
ComicBookGuy


Maybe we shouldn't have shown up at all, eh, smitty?


Could you ask that again - in japanese?
 
2007-06-24 09:04:15 AM  
Kiribub: Ashcroft would have thrown a wobbler over that, I think.

Hehehe! The French have always been more into tits, before the damned Euro took over they had a monetary note with a lass (in battle no less!) with her mamms out. I forget who, some national heroine. For that reason alone I've always had a soft(ish) spot for the French. Nothing wrong with celebrating the female form!
 
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