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(Funhouse)   Coolest calculator you'll see all day   (funhouse.bubble.ro ) divider line
    More: Interesting  
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14611 clicks; posted to Video » on 23 Jun 2007 at 10:43 AM (9 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



51 Comments     (+0 »)
 


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2007-06-23 05:59:14 AM  
I wasn't impressed until he tried 31 + 31. That was cool.
 
2007-06-23 06:16:40 AM  
that's pretty cool
 
2007-06-23 06:37:15 AM  
Yeah it's cool, but can it display the number 5138008?
 
2007-06-23 07:44:49 AM  
mitsubachi: No, but the marbles kinda look like little boobies.
 
2007-06-23 07:47:50 AM  
Very cool. I was expecting the marbles to get stuck or mess up the calculator when they dropped en-mass...
 
2007-06-23 09:40:38 AM  
nifty. no practical use, but I'd like to have this novelty for myself.
 
2007-06-23 10:13:18 AM  
Its when an abacus and a pinball machine has sex!

///Still trying to figure out my slide rule.
 
2007-06-23 10:54:40 AM  
Not impressed - the machine isn't doing the adding.

If you want to add 16 + 2, you drop the ball in column 2 and column 16. Now where does the machine tell you that it's equal to 18? It doesn't - you have to figure that out in your head.

All the machine does is say - "Yep, you dropped the balls in column 2 an 16 - now look at the pretty tumbles I can do."
 
2007-06-23 10:57:49 AM  
chuckayoub

. . . spoilsport
 
2007-06-23 11:05:12 AM  
yoyopro

...sorry, I couldn't resist.
 
2007-06-23 11:22:53 AM  
I visited the guys Web site where he showcases all of his work. It lacks an RSS feed.
 
2007-06-23 11:24:17 AM  
Thats awesome! I was just wondering the other day, if there was a calculator that can only add up to 63!

All joking aside, it was pretty cool!
 
2007-06-23 11:29:15 AM  
He said "aboot" at the end! Hehehehehehehehehehehehe.
 
2007-06-23 11:30:45 AM  
It's what the Apraphulians gave their children if they wanted them to grow up to become priests (or chartered accountants.)
 
2007-06-23 11:35:27 AM  
chuckayoub
If you want to add 16 + 2, you drop the ball in column 2 and column 16. Now where does the machine tell you that it's equal to 18? It doesn't - you have to figure that out in your head.

I can tell by your comment you don't fully understand the concept of using symbols to represent numbers. If I showed you the symbol "18" what would you tell me it means? "18" means: (10^1*1) + (10^0*8)... Or, simplified a bit: (10 * 1) + (1 * 8). In your speak "1 ball in the 10s column and 8 balls in the 1s column. You still need to take the sum of these values to know what the symbols represents.

If you don't know what the position of each digit in base-10 numbers means, I am not surprised you can't grasp the same idea in binary. There is no "2" or "16" column, those columns represent 2^1 and 2^4, respectively. Remember this is binary, base-2, just as with base-10, the digits are just placeholders for the value.
 
2007-06-23 11:40:19 AM  
Yay, binary with marbles.
 
2007-06-23 12:22:21 PM  
Yeah, right. How do we know it added those numbers up correctly? It could have just been spitting out random numbers!
 
2007-06-23 12:41:14 PM  
occasionalcontributer: Yeah, right. How do we know it added those numbers up correctly? It could have just been spitting out random numbers!

That sounds like a line from a short story from PK Dick (or Asimov), but damned if I can remember the name of it.

This thing looks like it could prove useful in an educational environment.
 
2007-06-23 12:51:23 PM  
Except that some of the "answers" have to be added together in order to get the result. I thought calculators were for people who can't add.
 
2007-06-23 01:00:27 PM  
nekom [TotalFark] 2007-06-23 09:40:38 AM
nifty. no practical use, but I'd like to have this novelty for myself.

It'd be handy if you're teaching intro to computer science. Kind of a niche market though :P
 
2007-06-23 01:04:41 PM  
frostymug
Except that some of the "answers" have to be added together in order to get the result. I thought calculators were for people who can't add.

Another person who doesn't understand counting systems other than decimal? Would it have been easier for you to grasp the concept if the output of the "5 + 6 + 7" example was "010010"?
 
2007-06-23 01:15:58 PM  
Jscott: Another person who doesn't understand counting systems other than decimal? Would it have been easier for you to grasp the concept if the output of the "5 + 6 + 7" example was "010010"?

To be perfectly fair, everything was labeled in base 10.

The complaint appears to be that the conversion into base 10 is really the harder part of adding binary numbers between 0 and 63. Base 2 is very unnatural when you haven't really needed to use it, even for people who end up having an education that employs it extensively. It's like when you're only semi-fluent in another language, so that you only understand it because you translate it into its analog in a language you are fluent in, as opposed to just being able to think in that language.

1111 looks like 15 to me, but I still need to make it base 10 "15" in my head before it really makes any sense.

Don't forget that there's nothing special about base 10. If you were raised in a base 2 world you'd be just as good as reading those results as you would be with base 10 results. The number "17" doesn't actually tell you any more about something than 10001 does, only cause you can't comprehend the magnitude of the latter. It's like if you don't know celsius. Just because you don't have the intuitive understanding how cold 16 C is doesn't mean the message is more hidden than it is when the thermometer says 61F.

Don't conflate symbols with their message.
 
2007-06-23 02:02:53 PM  
So this is what happens when a programmer gets a hold of a saw. ;)
 
2007-06-23 02:10:11 PM  
Jscott

Another person who doesn't understand counting systems other than decimal? Would it have been easier for you to grasp the concept if the output of the "5 + 6 + 7" example was "010010"?

I understand counting systems and I do not prefer binary to base 10. The result of adding 5 + 6 + 7 in the video is 16 + 2. My point is that the calculator does not give you the result as a single number. Well, if I need to add 16 + 2 in my head or on paper, then I might as well add 5 + 6 + 7 in my head or on paper in which case I don't need no calculator.
 
2007-06-23 02:18:48 PM  
ScreamingInDigital
That sounds like a line from a short story from PK Dick (or Asimov), but damned if I can remember the name of it.


Asimov, the short is called Feeling of Power
 
2007-06-23 02:35:40 PM  
To people who don't get it: This machine does add!


We are used to base 10, and because we are so used to it we
don't add the numbers together because it is so ingrained in our heads that we don't think about the addition that is implicitly done.

Base 10 example:
432 = 400 + 30 + 2
or: (4 * 10^2) + (3 * 10^1) + (2 * 10^0)
(there is a 4 in the "hundreds", a 3 in the tens and a 2 in
ones)

Why the machine "looks" like it is not adding: It is giving
the ANSWER in binary.
Base 2 example:
101 = 4 + 0 + 1
or: (4 * 2^2) + (0 * 2^1) + (1 * 2^0)
(there is a one, or on in the 4's place, a 0 or off in the
twos place and a one or on in the ones place)

Keep in mind that both the problem and solution are only presented in binary. The narrator is simply converting it to base 10 before and after the solution to show the result to people who don't already understand binary math. This step is unnecessary.

I hate to say it, there are only 10 types of people. People that
understand binary and people who don't!

//knew it would get said so I beat them to it
//10 (or on off) in binary is equal to two in decimal
 
2007-06-23 02:43:00 PM  
understand counting systems and I do not prefer binary to base 10. The result of adding 5 + 6 + 7 in the video is 16 + 2. My point is that the calculator does not give you the result as a single number. Well, if I need to add 16 + 2 in my head or on paper, then I might as well add 5 + 6 + 7 in my head or on paper in which case I don't need no calculator.

...No. It does not give you 16+2. It gives you 10010. The labeling at the top was just to give someone who only understands base 10 some help. The result is binary. Those switches all represent a 1 or a 0, depending on their position.
 
2007-06-23 02:57:05 PM  
Here is an example:

In binary what is 1n11 + 1010?

The answer is 1q01.

We are finished. There is no need to convert any of the numbers
to base 10 because we are using binary!
 
2007-06-23 03:03:50 PM  
There was junk in my example above. (ignore the math)

replace with: 1011011 + 1001 = 1100100


/I cheated with windows calculator and didn't preview my post!!!
/for shame!
 
2007-06-23 03:05:51 PM  
chuckayoub

It adds exactly the same way a digital electronic calculator adds.
 
2007-06-23 03:31:44 PM  
Not only does it add, but it stores the results. It only goes up to 64, but it bet it could still add up 8 or 9 numbers faster than most farkers. Add a few more bits and it'll be able to count even higher.
 
2007-06-23 04:07:49 PM  
Certainly, a lot of people do not recognize how calculators work. They cannot add the way we do because of limitations within their design. This is common with other concepts as well. For example, in doing differential equations, a graphing calculator may not be able to directly integrate an equation in a given domain. So, the Runge-Kutta methods are used. It is a related method to the Euler method in which iterative summation is used to approximately evaluate ordinary differential equations. The error can be made to be very small, but like this binary addition calculator, it uses a method that tends to be more complex that what people may use.
 
2007-06-23 04:18:37 PM  
OMG! math geeks!!

run for your lives!!!
 
2007-06-23 04:31:07 PM  
Thanks to all of you above for making my point and agreeing with me. Binary 18 looks like 10010. This notation in binary for 18 represents the equation 2^4 + 2^1. It requires the mind to do addition to comprehend it. Extremely large numbers expressed in binary aren't comprehended by the mind without at least counting the number of digits and I thought the point of calculators was so we didn't have to count.
 
2007-06-23 05:16:21 PM  
Meh, I built a more sophisticated calculator within a cellular automata simulation circa 1993.
It was cited in some grad student's thesis, too.
 
2007-06-23 05:52:03 PM  
webstore.maplesoft.com
Not impressed.
 
2007-06-23 05:56:15 PM  
Old Joke:

There are 10 kinds of people, those that understand binary, and those that don't.
 
2007-06-23 06:53:18 PM  
What was more boring: The video or some of your explainations?

Video was giving me a headache with all his bullshiat...


(not a 'numbers' kinda guy, tho)
 
2007-06-23 06:54:25 PM  
So basically you still have to calculate, by yourself.
 
2007-06-23 06:56:54 PM  
I always assumed math geeks on slashdot would be worse than math geeks on fark... and then monkeysay decides to post...
 
2007-06-23 08:09:54 PM  
There are only 10 kinds of people that work in base 4... those that drink and care, those that drink and don't care, those that care and don't drink, and those that don't drink and don't care.
 
2007-06-23 08:36:00 PM  
Jscott & monkeysay make my brain hurt.
 
2007-06-23 08:57:16 PM  
i couldn't finish the video - BORING
 
2007-06-23 11:21:47 PM  
Fursorfodder: Asimov, the short is called Feeling of Power

That is the story I was thinking of. Thanks.
 
2007-06-23 11:23:56 PM  
IT DOSNT ADD! BASE 10 IS THE ONLY BASE! BURN THE HERETICS!
 
2007-06-24 12:14:45 AM  
monkeysay To people who don't get it: This machine does add!


We are used to base 10, and because we are so used to it we
don't add the numbers together because it is so ingrained in our heads that we don't think about the addition that is implicitly done.

Base 10 example:
432 = 400 + 30 + 2
or: (4 * 10^2) + (3 * 10^1) + (2 * 10^0)
(there is a 4 in the "hundreds", a 3 in the tens and a 2 in
ones)

Why the machine "looks" like it is not adding: It is giving
the ANSWER in binary.
Base 2 example:
101 = 4 + 0 + 1
or: (4 * 2^2) + (0 * 2^1) + (1 * 2^0)
(there is a one, or on in the 4's place, a 0 or off in the
twos place and a one or on in the ones place)

Keep in mind that both the problem and solution are only presented in binary. The narrator is simply converting it to base 10 before and after the solution to show the result to people who don't already understand binary math. This step is unnecessary.

I hate to say it, there are only 10 types of people. People that
understand binary and people who don't!

//knew it would get said so I beat them to it
//10 (or on off) in binary is equal to two in decimal


WITCH!
 
2007-06-24 12:27:02 AM  
but seriously. these engaging and educational threads are a lot of fun. much more so than the religous vs. atheists and left vs. right hatefests so prevalent on Fark lately.
 
2007-06-24 05:07:43 AM  
there are 10 kinds of people in this world, those who understand trinary, those who think it's binary, and those who don't.

there are 10 kinds of people in this world, those who think in base 4, those who think it's base 3, those who thing it's binary, and those who just don't care.

/and so on
 
2007-06-24 09:23:51 AM  
absolutely great. As someone said already, it's refreshing to see something mentally stimulating here. The thought that went into designing that gives Me hope for humanity. Not everyone spends their free time watching fox news.
 
2007-06-25 08:30:24 PM  
As a man with an English degree, I found it to be pretty neato. Granted, until I read this thread I didnt realize it was giving me a binary answer, but oh well.
 
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