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(WFSB)   Over 2000 students may have to repeat current grade because they have 19 or more unexcused absences. Board of Education president: "These kids shouldn't be advancing -- end of discussion"   (wfsb.com) divider line 773
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21141 clicks; posted to Main » on 14 Jun 2007 at 11:06 AM (7 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2007-06-14 01:16:56 PM
Uchiha_Cycliste

I think you may have missed my point, because it sounds like you are trying to contradict me when in fact we agree.
 
2007-06-14 01:17:00 PM
Then you should fail the bottom 3rd.

If american schools actually failed dummies then our education system might be able to educate.

Actually I couldnt disagree more - I didnt say that the bottom third barely - MANY of them still can make B or even "A" marks on the exams- they just need to be TAUGHT how to do the work - in other words - I NEED TO DO MY FARKING JOB AND TEACH them because it doesnt come naturally. This is a general class, not honors or AP, I would be a piss poor teacher if I expected everything I taught to be picked up by everyone in 10 minutes.
 
2007-06-14 01:17:00 PM
Quaker: For an intelligent person, even a day left to their own thoughts will get them further than sitting in most public high schools.

Actually, that is a bunch of crap. If you are 'intelligent' you have more than enough opportunity to get into advanced classes and/or some sort of running start program.
 
2007-06-14 01:18:02 PM
pendy575

By law attendance can not be a factor in grades...its a state law...you can look it up.

You live in Iowa, this happened in Connecticut. Since when does Iowa law control what happens in another state?
 
2007-06-14 01:18:08 PM
I had a job where I could get a full days worth of work done in 3 hours, so I just started showing up at work at 3 PM. I was overqualified, and my boss knew I was moving on soon, so he allowed it.

Also, in high school, if you can't figure a way to be counted as present while skipping school, you deserve to fail. I have certificates for perfect attendance, yet skipped many times.
 
2007-06-14 01:18:33 PM
Damn got a little too quick on the "Add comment" button again...
 
2007-06-14 01:18:34 PM
LouDobbsAwaaaay
You could always tell which were the useless courses in my college by whether or not they counted attendance for grade. Every literature class I ever took was absolutely rabid about you being there every single day - two absences means you drop a letter grade, and a third means you fail. Math and science, on the other hand, could give a shiat whether you show up or not. Just take the tests, and hand in homework in the classes where homework was actually collected and graded.

The classes that are difficult enough that you should show up and take notes in order to pass usually don't enforce attendance. They don't need to.


I made the huge mistake of going to an Art school, where they enforced attendance in every class, because they wanted your money. If you failed because of attendance, it meant that you'd have to pay for that class again next trimester and they'd get more money. I ended up telling my college to fark off and dropped out. At the time I was 19 (maybe 20, can't exactly remember) and already making $27,000/year working IT.

Oh well I work IT for a living now, which requires no degree and I hold a ton of certifications, and have 8 years experience under my belt. college is for suckers, learn a trade.
 
2007-06-14 01:19:10 PM
Badassmother4thousand
only 2?
Freshmen year was an eye opener for me too, but not by that much.

/Spent my first 2 years drinking, 2.0 GPA average
//Spent last 2 years poking smot, averaged a 3.25 GPA
///Drinking will hurt your grades way more than poking smot.
 
2007-06-14 01:19:10 PM
Skipping school can affect other students. Ever have a lab partner not show up? Either you have to do all the work yourself, or you have to triple up with another group and stumble over eachother.

We're talking 19 UNEXCUSED absenses. If you're too good to show up for class, you're too good for the certificate letting you advance.

Screw 'em.
 
2007-06-14 01:20:23 PM
Wow...if I added up all the time I missed in high school, I'd probably be short a year and a half. I found the curriculum and delivery really boring. Even with zero effort (I showed up for tests, that's pretty much it) I still pulled off a B average.

Cool thing was that in my final year I was on a "split shift" because there were two schools populating one building. One went from 7:30 am until noon, and the other went from noon until 5:30. Sucked to be in the afternoon shift in the warm months; you could always tell which students went to which school based on their tans. We also had to share lockers - they were provided on a "lottery" basis. Can't imagine why a teen wouldn't find that environment stimulating?
 
2007-06-14 01:21:47 PM
Quaker: Exactly my point, it's the responsibility of the teachers/administrators to make the subject matter challenging enough. Teachers often said to classes I was in, "Don't waste my time, and I won't waste yours". If only they actually meant it...

That works in college, but not k-12. Most kids, regardless of intelligence, are too stupid to fully realize the impact of their decisions. So what if you're a little bored, you'll get over it.
 
2007-06-14 01:21:51 PM
This exact same thing almost happened to me. My state instituted a "9 unexcused absences = failure" law in my senior year. I was also required to take health that year, health class being unavailable to non-seniors. Due to scheduling conflicts with my AP Chemistry, Physics, and Calculus, I was forced to take the zero-hour health class that started at 7 a.m. Since I rode my bike to school and was not a morning person, I was chronically tardy. Not by a lot, mind you. I would frequently come in just as the bell finished going off. The teacher, seemingly a laid-back fellow, never made anything of it, and it was always several minutes after the buzzer before class really got rolling. Little did I know that he was a passive-aggressive bastard, tired of putting up with all the kids' shiat, and determined to get back at us a little. Without saying anything or giving any clue, every time I walked in right after the buzzer, he was marking my name on the tardy sheet. Since three tardies = 1 unexcused absence, and I did this nearly every day, about 30 days into the year, I came in and he said, "Go to study hall. You have 9 absences and can't pass this class." Which also meant I couldn't graduate. Of course I went to the Principal and raised a big ruckus, but his hands were tied by state law, as there was no mechanism for forgiving tardies, and the teacher was sticking by his guns. Well, I stubbornly continued going to the class, arriving ten minutes early for the entire rest of the year, eating the teacher's shiat every day, getting perfect marks on every test, even though he gave no indication he had any plans to give me a break. I guess he finally had a change of heart, because by the end of the semester, one of the tardies had disappeared from the roster, and I was able to graduate.

/Bastard
//Don't trust passive-aggressive people, they will stab you in the back
 
2007-06-14 01:22:31 PM
drunkenmidnight
Oh well I work IT for a living now, which requires no degree and I hold a ton of certifications, and have 8 years experience under my belt. college is for suckers, learn a trade.
Maybe were you work. shiat we won't even hire helpdesk without a 2 year degree. Sysadmins minumum 4 year and developers the same. Unless Senior Developer than they must have a Masters or PhD. We have one that did not work his way up, the rest have BSs and started as regular developers.

/Certs are a joke, read the brain dump then take the test
//Other than the high end cisco ones, those take a little more.
 
2007-06-14 01:22:39 PM
img526.imageshack.us

Unexcused absence is no big deal...
 
2007-06-14 01:23:40 PM
I graduated high school with 39 excused absences my senior year, which includes only ones they knew about (I skipped around 70), and honor roll. I had girls write me notes and I was friends with the nurse and a few teachers.

I think it is obvious that attendance should not be the deciding factor on whether you pass or fail a class. Only the grade that is received in a course can be used as a reason to hold someone back.
 
2007-06-14 01:25:03 PM
*checks under hood*

"Oh, there's the problem! It's a public school."

*closes hood, wipes grease off hands*
 
2007-06-14 01:25:43 PM
mLayth
I'm not trying to contradict you, I'm trying to reinforce the notion that a ranked school is no guarantee of well spoken (or comprehensible) English, and I feel almost sorry that you have to go through it; but get used to it, the working world will be much worse. =(
 
2007-06-14 01:26:06 PM
kidtruth: I have never understood why abscences effect your grade. If you miss a day that a test is taking place, you fail that test -- Okay, I get it.

But if I can get an A in your idiot f*cking class without being there, it's your fault for making it so easy. This is the attitude I had towards college, and the attitude was rewarded there. Most professors treat their classes like this, at least where I went to school - why isn't high school more like this?

Do these students realize that when they get to college the focus shifts from doing your work in school to doing 90% of your work at home, on your own time - and just getting outlines and basic input from the professor


I went to every single class in HS just because I didn't want the hassle of dealing with "cuts". It was completely pointless.

I didn't realize this until college. Far less time in the classroom, far more difficult, far more tiring. It's almost like I didn't need to actually use my brainpower back in HS, I just had to sit there, and it wasn't the case in college. Finally.

No one cared about attending really, but I showed up as often as I could.

lilplatinum: /I think I managed to go to class no more than a dozen times one semester for 4 classes
//ALways take classes where your grade is 100% based on your papers and you can be lazy too.


In college? By then you should be taking classes for yourself, not just to get shuffled along like you did in HS. I can't tolerate folks who have the attitude that "college is just like high school." You're not there because you've been mandated and it doesn't matter at all.

aesc: I taught high school for 10 years. I DID NOT go to clown college. I am not a comedian or an entertainer. Some times stuff is just boring. Suck it up.

You want to be bored? Go to an all day faculty meeting.


I've never met a subject that couldn't be taught in an interesting fashion. Unfortunately, interest is in the eye of the beholder. I can be glued to my seat for hours listening to lectures on stuff that would make a lot of kids really bored and confused just because I find the subject matter inherently interesting.

There's also a difference between thinking a subject is BS and not caring at all. I hate psychobabble (going to an engineering school), so I really hate it when people make overly contrived interpretations or produce ridiculous parallels. I mean, meaning is inherently two sided, the reader puts in as much as the writer, but sometimes it feels like you can say absolutely anything you want and everyone gets a pat on the back anyway. But that's different than some random hoodlum never going to class, and when they do, looking bored out of their minds. "This is ridiculous" is a different kind of response than "I don't need no education." Hopefully teachers can tell the difference. Not all subjects are for everyone, but there's a difference between active, intellectual rejection, and just plain apathy.
 
2007-06-14 01:27:11 PM
Btw, this is about money, nothing else. Every day that a student's butt isn't in that chair is a day the school doesn't get paid by the state and feds for him.
 
2007-06-14 01:28:47 PM
I had problems with attendance when I was a kid (so I'm getting a kick out of these replies, etc).

I went through this phase where I couldn't stand being forced to attend school against my will. In the end, threaths, such as those in TFA, basically resulted in me not attending school at all. Between my sixth and ninth school year, I was away so much that I could probably count the days I attended on one hand. Yet, I still passed without problems. The reason for that is quite simple; I was motivated to study on my own, for my own benefit. If they had enforced the compulsory education policy any further than they did, they would most likely only have made matters worse for me.

During that time, I was always amazed at how inefficiently the time was used in school. Even though I was a rather lazy pupil, I still had no problems keeping up with the rest of my class. I can only speculate as to why that is, but one guess is that the majority of the kids are not feeling like they are attending school for their own good, and are, as a consequence, not motivated to use the time efficiently. Efforts to tackle low attendance would probably be much better spent on making the education more interesting, as well as on getting the kids to understand that they should attend for their own good, and not because they have to.

I'm studying at a university now, and since I'm no longer forced to attend, I'm for the first time ever actually enjoying going to school. I have had no problems reaching my own expectations, and I would be modest at best if I said that I'm just doing alright. I believe that I was in many ways better prepared for university than others, since I was already used to studying independently.

Naturally, I have a problems with TFA. A school should primarily be concerned with teaching knowledge, not obedience. If a school has problems with pupils not attending, then they're obviously not doing their jobs right. If the students don't want to attend, then that's their own choice, and in the end, their own responsibility. That, in itself, is a much more important lesson than much of the information schools are forcing their students to memorize these days. I really doubt that forcing students to attend against their own will is going to somehow turn them into better students. The simple fact is that if people are motivated to learn, they will learn. And vice versa.

Just my opinions.

/"All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood"
//unless, of course, they are school kids, in which case they have no say, and you are free to boss them around all you want
 
2007-06-14 01:29:54 PM
I think it is obvious that attendance should not be the deciding factor on whether you pass or fail a class. Only the grade that is received in a course can be used as a reason to hold someone back.

Again as a teacher, I just about agree with you EXCEPT all of those absences create more work for ME - and while you may not care, I am here to tell you if you've got 10% of your students playing the "hide and seek" game it becomes a huge drain on your productivity...

Having to make new tests because everyone else has already seen the test since you missed 4 days in a row.
Having to grade your homework sperately and out of sequence because you turned it in 3 days late etc etc...

Theres no way you miss 40 days a year without this happening repeatedly, and its a giant pain in the ass, so please excuse your teachers for getting just a bit testy about it - the same way MOST people do when they have to work with farkheads who constantly make their lives miserable.
 
2007-06-14 01:30:09 PM
Uchiha_Cycliste

Ah, well then forgive my misunderstanding.
Damn these language barriers!
 
2007-06-14 01:31:19 PM
I'm sure most of the 2000+ kids were straight-A students who were just so far ahead that they didn't need to attend classes.

C'mon.

I coasted through school doing practically no homework. Now, at the age of 35, I would give anything to have been forced to learn better study habits. My grades and testing ability allowed me to get into college, but as an adult I have to struggle to get any work done unless someone is standing over me, demanding the effort.

Look'it me...posting on Fark when I have two major projects I need to wrap up today!

School is for educating, and for skills training (social and personal). I'm all for more stringent policies.
 
2007-06-14 01:31:30 PM
GaryPDX: "I don't like these rules so I'm not going to follow them."

/life these days


Isnt that how we got to where we are?

Or maybe youd prefer life as a serf paying tithes and following rules.
 
2007-06-14 01:31:41 PM
High school is a buncha bull anyway...

If you are smart enough to do your work, do well on the tests and projects, and make a high enough grade to pass, you exhibit satisfactory knowledge of the subject matter and should be allowed to move on to the next grade. "End of discussion." Your actual rate of attendance is irrelevant to your understanding of the subject.


And for all you people saying "Well, if you did that at WORK no one would like it LOL!!!!", well, work and school are not the same thing, is it? Work is when you get paid to perform a service for someone else. School is when you are forced to go sit in a room and listen to someone for hours on end, 5 days a week for 12-16+ years of your life. Kinda different concepts there.
 
2007-06-14 01:34:30 PM
Has noobdy here been to college? (Haven't read all 400+ comments)

A lot of college's have strict attendance policies, more so than this high school. Seventy days in one semester is a lot of school to miss. If I miss more than two classes in a full semester at college, I lose a letter grade. Miss five classes and I fail. And I'm paying to be there! I wish I could go to school for free still and get up to 69 days off if I wanted.
 
2007-06-14 01:36:56 PM
Shishkaboom
Also you should mention salaried jobs, I showed up a half an hour late and am leaving at 2pm. No one cares, why? because they can call me at 2am and I will come fix a server.

Fizpez
How about you don't make new tests? If they miss a test they get a 0 on it. If homework is late that is a 0, or an automatic 50% or something. Don't do more work.
 
2007-06-14 01:41:12 PM
Calvaire: Man, I apparently went to high school at the wrong time. I wish I had been there with most of the farkers here. Sounds like there were near empty classroom with the five or so kids too stupid to skip while everyone else is at home farking their loved ones. After a little romp in bed, you go teach yourself enough calculus to pass the Man's test tomorrow, then go work on shattering the world record for pole vaulting with your penis.

I seriously missed out.




That's the point I was making earlier. I LOL'd at your post.
 
2007-06-14 01:41:29 PM
Uncle Karl
Maybe were you work. shiat we won't even hire helpdesk without a 2 year degree. Sysadmins minumum 4 year and developers the same. Unless Senior Developer than they must have a Masters or PhD. We have one that did not work his way up, the rest have BSs and started as regular developers.

/Certs are a joke, read the brain dump then take the test
//Other than the high end cisco ones, those take a little more.


I do networking, support, mass imaging hardware repair, etc. I hold enterprise level certs with major companies making my organization a partner. Which means I can generate revenue by doing warranty repairs for all in house equipment. Not only do i get the job done, I generate money as I do it.

I also contract out and do lots of Macintosh work for businesses because their IT staff is either A) too lazy to learn a new platform, B) too closed minded and elitist about it, or C) just plain dumb

I agree certs don't mean jack, but they do add up, just like your diploma doesn't mean jack either. I know people who have masters in technology and are dumber than a box of rocks, and can't even manage a switch or set up a RAID, which to me is basic.

education works differently for everyone, I am the type of person who learns best on my own. give me a book, and some study material and I can accomplish just about anything in given time with technology, and it comes natural to me. I taught myself shell scripting with no one's help and actually wrote our complete shell script for our network imaging solution from novell, zen imaging. The script automates the imaging process so when a tech has to image a machine, all he has to do is netboot and select the option, the rest is done in the background. I wrote the shell script in my 2nd week of teaching myself shell scripting. Not bad for not having a tech college degree IMO.

If I went back to school to get a degree it wouldn't be in technology anyways, I wouldn't learn that much to justify the ungodly costs of education in this country. I'd get it in english or some subject I enjoy and have it just to say I had a degree.
 
2007-06-14 01:41:37 PM
Where is the "Let Are kids walk" pic? come on Fark!
 
2007-06-14 01:43:16 PM
It said unexcused absences.

How hard is it to get a note from the parents? I wonder how many legitimate absences the same kids had..
 
2007-06-14 01:43:51 PM
I know this will upset a lot of college professors, but what the heck. When I was an adjunct, I was told to be very careful about failing someone (or even lowering their grade) for absences.

The reasoning behind this was that grades should reflect what the students learned, not whether or not they showed up for class.

Of course, we were also told that the way around this was to assign in-class work that could not be made up.
 
2007-06-14 01:44:06 PM
What a dumbass.

"If a school has problems with pupils not attending, then they're obviously not doing their jobs right."

....because all kids are first and foremost dediacted scholars dedicated to self improvement in lieu of distracting activities, right?.
 
2007-06-14 01:46:46 PM
Hey morrabroad--note; an attendance policy incentive made you show up to class on time. Imagine that.
 
2007-06-14 01:47:48 PM
madnotcrazy: Make up stories much?

Praetorius: Waaah! I want my mommy!

Scanlon Kelsey: Impressed with yourself yet?

Millzners: I became an Electrical Engineer...
Wonder why you had more fun in high school than in college?
 
2007-06-14 01:47:58 PM
81 BS absences senior year, finished ranked 13/700+

Attended good college, showed up to class only on test days, graduated with an A-

Currently earning a great living at a job I could have easily done when I was about 10

school is worthless, just sayin'
 
2007-06-14 01:50:58 PM
As some have said in this thread, I think the majority of my classes in college that have required attendance is because the professor is a farkwit and the class is useless.

One exception only: one of my favorite professors gives extremely minimal homework and a good part of your grade is based on what you bring to the discussion in class. Basically, if you aren't there, you can't discuss, so you can't pass. But she was generous with excused absences, and a damn tough grader on papers.

in contrast was my class last semester in which we were there to listen to the professor stroke his own ego. asshole.
 
2007-06-14 01:51:04 PM
itzhak
During that time, I was always amazed at how inefficiently the time was used in school. Even though I was a rather lazy pupil, I still had no problems keeping up with the rest of my class.

I hear what you are saying... But don't you feel that if more of the bright kids were in a class room, they could feed-off/challenge each other? Not saying compulsory attendance will solve all ills -- but its a start.

Efforts to tackle low attendance would probably be much better spent on making the education more interesting, as well as on getting the kids to understand that they should attend for their own good, and not because they have to.

Yes, there should be more money spent on improving education -- but how can you implement that curriculum without students? We can't have one without the other.


/"All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood"
//unless, of course, they are school kids, in which case they have no say, and you are free to boss them around all you want


Actually, the school kids ARE free... they just have to accept the consequences of their actions.
 
2007-06-14 01:51:25 PM
FTFA - "Students with 19 or more unexcused absences can't advance grades."

The key word here is "unexcused." I doubt they'll punish some kid who was laid up in the hospital with a broken leg for a few weeks but still managed to get homework in on time. This punishment is meant for those who just plain didn't show up and couldn't even muster enough care to forge a written parental excuse or get a friend to call in for them. Nope, no sympathy here.
 
2007-06-14 01:51:35 PM
Vertigo688:
Nineteen days in one school year means you've probably missed more than you'll ever hope to re-learn in time for final exams.

It took me two weeks to learn everything that NY state says I need to know in physics as a high school student.

Fizpez:
Having said all that, I know and advanced class is not always available, nor in many cases, wanted by the student. Most would rather have the easy "A", no extra work, and be free to biatch about their education at a later date. Hey its cool with me, but I really dont see much of an alternative - there is simply not enough money to have class sizes of 10 equally talented students who progress at the same pace for every subject, in every school.

How about letting students SKIP GRADES, take classes at a higher level/grade, take classes at special gifted schools, have special gifted programs (ie: after school but they get free periods in school), let them take classes at local colleges, give them things to do on their own, etc, etc.

Solutions exist but no one gives a damn.

eldritch2k4:
Because they have the rule. That's what it boils down to. At the beginning of the year, the schools point the students at the handbook and say, "You follow the rules as outlined in this book or you don't pass."

One of the rules in the book is "You attend at least 90% of the 180 day schedule, unless there is a medical reason or other emergency." If you don't follow that, you don't pass. Simple as that.

How dare they enforce a rule that has stood for years?! Why do they have the rule? Because they figure if you can follow this rule when you aren't getting any monetary gain, then you can probably follow an attendance policy when you are getting money.


My High School had a rule that said no one can graduate early, that just made it more fun to do so. My middle school had a rule about who could take advanced classes (7th graders), that made it annoying so I managed to force the school to exempt me from all math classes.

If you blindly follow stupid rules simply because they are there then you are a sheep. I don't.

The school system is there to educate and prepare students for life in the real world. In the real world, you show up for work or you don't have a job. Stands to reason that if that applies in the real world, then schools would have a similar policy.

I get paid to do something not to show up to work and twiddle my thumbs. If I have a contract that says I am to do X for Y dollars then I do X, the faster I do it the more I make. School is there to teach students, if they meet their end without being there all the time then they have done their job.

Schools aren't just there to teach "book smarts." Point is, it doesn't matter if you learn the material without showing up. There are other factors to being successful in school than "I got a C and passed."

The most important thing I learned in school was how to deal with stupid people in power and how to get around stupid rules. I slept in almost all my classes and got As, wasn't hard. Most of my classes did exactly what was in the book. In 5th grade I did the math homework 4 months in advance, so did a few other people to the point where it was a game to us.

/I'm 23 years old
//I felt the same way in high school
///Get the hell off my lawn, ya punks.


I'm 22 in a few weeks, have a masters and have a very nice job. Part of the reason I got into a good college was because I didn't blindly do what I was told.
 
2007-06-14 01:52:21 PM
In 6 years of teaching I have had only 2 students that I can think of offhand who missed more than 18 days of school and were still able to maintain a C average or higher in my class. One of them was pregnant and had to be put on bed-rest, but still got an A. The other was frequently sick.

Otherwise, the majority of students (I can count 17 in my head offhand) that were frequently absent either barely squeaked by with a D- or Failed my class anyhow. Some of them never graduated, and the ones who did are not in college now.
 
2007-06-14 01:52:28 PM
AngryTeacher
Why do you need a way around it?
Why do you care if they show up?

/Had to show up to CS labs back in college just long enough for attendance, then I went back to my room, poked smot and did my work. I averaged a 3.5 in all the CS labs I had to take. It was annoying.

drunkenmidnight
I was not saying that you could not do it without a degree, just that many employers would not hire you.

Setting up RAID is not something a college degree teaches nor should it. A college degree should teach you what RAID is and how to use it, and when it is needed. Setting up RAID can be learned by playing with the RAID controllers setup screen. Hell, each one is different. The same with switches, College should teach what spanning tree is and how it works, how a switch does its job, and how switches fit into networks, learning to use a switch is not a hard task if you know what it should be doing.

The theory behind it all is just as important as the actual doing, or else you end up with morons using RAID5 in a 3 disc array for a Database.
 
2007-06-14 01:53:34 PM
I had mono one year and one of my teachers wanted to hold me back for excessive absences. I had a pass grade so my mom told him to Fark off. He was a lousy teacher who thought somehow by being in his class you learned something from the walls or something, because he wasn't doing any teaching. School is about learning. If you've learned the lessons you move to the next grade. If you have unexcused absences it's a discipline issue, not an academic one. At my school, if you missed a day, the first day you were back you took your excuse note to the nurses office during homeroom. If you didn't have an excuse you brought it the next day. By the third day if you forgot it you got detention, and you kept getting detention until you brought it in.

The flaw in the system was what they considered an excuse. I felt really crappy one day, but my mom refused to let me stay home. I stayed home anyway. She refused to give me a note. I nearly got detention. I sweet talked a couple extra days, and finally convinced her to write a note for me. In her award winningly legible handwriting she said I had not had permission to stay home and that I had essentially skipped school (I stand by being sick). Once the nurses got the note I was off the hook. They were worried about bookkeeping, not attendance. It sounds like this school has the same issue.

Advancing to the next grade should be about passing the class. Attendance should be about being sick. They should be cracking down on parents for letting their kids off to easy.
 
2007-06-14 01:54:12 PM
I applaud this school district. Youth is best spent locked up in a nationalism-invoking institute. Children need to be taught how to turn off certain dangerous parts of their brains and to focus their attention on serving their country. I think we see problems today because of the liberally-biased teachers and the absence of God in the classrooms.
 
2007-06-14 01:54:30 PM
Fizpez
My mom and dad are both teachers.

Actually, as a person with a drive to learn, I studied the administrative system in my skool and realized there were two seperate entities that worked almost completely independent of each other.

On one hand the teachers, who had their own attendance system. Miss a class, and only the teacher can get upset at you.

On the other hand is the administration, and as long as you sign a sheet in the morning saying you are there then they get the money. Consequently I had my teacher in the morning sign me in every day. He was a good guy and I gave him a hug at graduation.

My point is, I snuck in most days to attend my advanced math course, which I purposely had scheduled as my last class of the day (it's great waking up at 12PM every day).

I never, ever, missed a quiz unless I was genuinely sick (or the quiz was in my BS cooking class I took senior year). I also rarely did homework unless I considered it worthwhile and I often informed the teacher to mark it down a zero (usually a few days in advance).
 
2007-06-14 01:54:35 PM
It doesn't sound like anyone was forewarned. It sounds like they just whipped a number out of the sky once the diploma's started rolling in for signatures.

And why people are complaining is beyond me - it isn't as if your children are yours anymore. The government just rents them out to you so you can watch them.
 
2007-06-14 01:56:09 PM
Yes, High School is a joke but so what? Grow up, show the fark up to school and get it over with.
 
2007-06-14 01:56:11 PM
I'm sure most of the 2000+ kids were straight-A students who were just so far ahead that they didn't need to attend classes.

Then their grades would be the reason for holding them back. Not their attendance. I mean, the per-student attendance check that the school receives.

Having to make new tests because everyone else has already seen the test since you missed 4 days in a row.

If you are skipping class and missing tests, you deserve your 0. I think the issue here is that if attendance is the ONLY reason to hold students back, then many people will call shenanigans.

/30 absences senior year of high school. I had better things to do than listen to mouth-breathing teachers instruct mouth-breathing students.
 
2007-06-14 01:56:33 PM
stappawho: Actually, that is a bunch of crap. If you are 'intelligent' you have more than enough opportunity to get into advanced classes and/or some sort of running start program.

That's assuming two things: that you live in a good school district which can afford things like advanced and running start programs (which many cannot), and that can afford real teachers for these or any other programs instead of people who read information from a book and regurgitate it to the class (which, again, many cannot). When it comes time for budget cuts, advanced programs are first on the chopping block.

That works in college, but not k-12. Most kids, regardless of intelligence, are too stupid to fully realize the impact of their decisions. So what if you're a little bored, you'll get over it.

First of all, we're discussing only high school grades nine through twelve here. I agree that dealing with children is different than dealing with adolescents. Second, that is what a grading system and parents are for. If you skipped half of your freshman year in high school and got horrible grades, hopefully your parents would get mad and use whatever parental means to correct your behavior (and if they don't care, I would argue that chances unfortunately aren't good for that particular teenager in the first place). If you skipped all those days and passed, good for you.

There is an entire movement that is along these lines, specifically arguing that the age at which a student can decide to drop out of high school should be lowered or abolished. The argument is that students who really don't want to be in high school to the point that they wish to drop out entirely are only acting as a detriment to the students who want to be there. I tend to agree.

Also, this is a much larger issue than whether or not some kids are "bored". This trivialization of their humanity is what leads to a lot of these problems in the first place.
 
2007-06-14 01:56:41 PM
Oh yeah--from the examples on Fark,we cna conclude we dont need teahgcers. Everyone can just learn on their own. Just have a pile of books, a study plan, people drive buy, grab a copy, toss it to their kid, take a GED. thats all we really need. Evidently, no one actually needs teachers to learn--its all easy, for everyone, on their own. No one actually gains knowledge from interaction with other human beings.

/morans
 
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