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(Infoplease)   June 6, 1944. Thousands of Allied soldiers climbed out of landing craft to face German machine guns and artillery. Many never saw another day. You may now return to your regularly scheduled Iraq flamewar already in progress   (infoplease.com) divider line 485
    More: Hero  
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8750 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 Jun 2007 at 11:52 AM (7 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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DD0
2007-06-06 10:27:47 AM  
God bless them and everyone like them. It's hard to think of that day and think of the position our soldiers are in today.
 
2007-06-06 10:29:24 AM  
Thanks to those Allied soldiers for their sacrifices.

Now, get our men and women out of Iraq where their lives are just being thrown away.
 
2007-06-06 10:35:22 AM  
Sad that this thread is clearly not going to be about D-Day.
 
2007-06-06 10:45:42 AM  
As sent to everyone at my work today by one of the VPs:

On this day in 1944, Supreme Allied Commander General Dwight D. Eisenhower gives the go-ahead for largest amphibious military operation in history: Operation Overlord, code-named D-Day, the Allied invasion of northern France.

By daybreak, 18,000 British and American parachutists were already on the ground. At 6:30 a.m., American troops came ashore at Utah and Omaha beaches. At Omaha, the U.S. First Division battled high seas, mist, mines, burning vehicles-and German coastal batteries, including an elite infantry division, which spewed heavy fire. Many wounded Americans ultimately drowned in the high tide. British divisions, which landed at Gold, and Sword beaches, and Canadian troops, landing at Juno beach, also met with heavy German fire, but by the end of the day they were able to push inland.

Despite the German resistance, Allied casualties overall were relatively light. The United States and Britain each lost about 1,000 men, and Canada 355. Before the day was over, 155,000 Allied troops would be in Normandy. However, the United States managed to get only half of the 14,000 vehicles and a quarter of the 14,500 tons of supplies they intended on shore.

Three factors were decisive in the success of the Allied invasion. First, German counterattacks were firm but sparse, enabling the Allies to create a broad bridgehead, or advanced position, from which they were able to build up enormous troop strength. Second, Allied air cover, which destroyed bridges over the Seine, forced the Germans to suffer long detours, and naval gunfire proved decisive in protecting the invasion troops. And third, division and confusion within the German ranks as to where the invasion would start and how best to defend their position helped the Allies. (Hitler, convinced another invasion was coming the next day east of the Seine River, refused to allow reserves to be pulled from that area.)

Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery, commander of Britain's Twenty-first Army Group (but under the overall command of General Eisenhower, for whom Montgomery, and his ego, proved a perennial thorn in the side), often claimed later that the invasion had come off exactly as planned. That was a boast, as evidenced by the failure to take Caen on the first day, as scheduled. While the operation was a decided success, considering the number of troops put ashore and light casualties, improvisation by courageous and quick-witted commanders also played an enormous role.
 
2007-06-06 10:49:59 AM  
I can never think about something like that without being struck by the senseless waste. These kids lived their lives, went to school, prepared for some meaningful existence. Then they went through some degree of military training, faced new challenges in doing that, got all the way to Normandy... and so many of them never even made it off the boats.

I'm not talking about waste in the national sense (what it meant to the allies), but just in terms of a life lost so easily. Blam, all the preparation and 20 years of life gone in a heartbeat... and then you're just another piece of meat bleeding in the surf.

I can't rationalize that in my head and make it ok.
 
2007-06-06 10:52:26 AM  
Wait? What the fark? A hero tag that was used correctly? Wow.
 
2007-06-06 10:57:17 AM  
Time to watch the Day of Days episode of Band of Brothers again.
 
2007-06-06 10:58:58 AM  
img488.imageshack.us

Thank you.
 
2007-06-06 11:01:53 AM  
Mordant
I can never think about something like that without being struck by the senseless waste. These kids lived their lives, went to school, prepared for some meaningful existence. Then they went through some degree of military training, faced new challenges in doing that, got all the way to Normandy... and so many of them never even made it off the boats.

It's sad and regrettable, and yet no matter how quickly or randomly some of these young men may have lost their lives, there are good odds that their lives were better spent than yours or mine.

Unfortunately, rationalizations don't work very well in life.
 
2007-06-06 11:09:54 AM  
An intense account of the Normandy beach battle: http://www.amnation.com/vfr/archives/005823.html (pops)
 
2007-06-06 11:14:28 AM  
Speaking for myself, they're remembered and honored.
 
2007-06-06 11:19:20 AM  
Thank you for you honor and courage. Also, thanks for the groundwork for tons of WWII video games.
 
2007-06-06 11:20:51 AM  
For Mordant
and yes I know this was written in WWI but it is still poignant for any soldiers who die in battle.


In Flanders Fields
By: Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae, MD (1872-1918)
Canadian Army
IN FLANDERS FIELDS the poppies blow
Between the crosses row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.
 
2007-06-06 11:36:36 AM  
Wise_Guy
An intense account of the Normandy beach battle: http://www.amnation.com/vfr/archives/005823.html (pops)


That is just Omaha Beach. Granted Omaha saw the worst of the fighting but there were other landing sites at Utah (where my grandfather landed to direct naval gunfire), Juno, Sword, and Gold beaches.
 
2007-06-06 11:40:28 AM  
Wise_Guy: An intense account of the Normandy beach battle

All accounts of it are intense. From all perspectives at the time.
 
2007-06-06 11:48:01 AM  
Mordant: I can never think about something like that without being struck by the senseless waste.

Spending your life and efforts to accomplish something greater than yourself is never a "waste". neither is spending your life to protect those who are unable to protect themselves. It's sad that you see it that way.
 
2007-06-06 11:53:57 AM  
Scooby's'pawn: Spending your life and efforts to accomplish something greater than yourself is never a "waste". neither is spending your life to protect those who are unable to protect themselves. It's sad that you see it that way.

I knew someone would come along and completely miss my point, so thanks for getting that out of the way.

The thing is that they really never even got the chance to do what they trained and hoped to do. We honor the heroes who saved lives, completed objectives, or whatever. Some of these guys never got to even fire a single shot, and never saw the bullet coming as they arrived on those boats. I'm not belittling their efforts in any way, so screw you if that's what you think I'm saying. It's just shocking that so much work and effort can be extinguished so instantly.

Sometimes I wish I never even said anything around this f*cking place.
 
2007-06-06 11:57:59 AM  
Mordant:

Don't worry about it...people read things the way they want to. Most of us knew what you meant...
 
2007-06-06 11:59:20 AM  
my grandpa took 2 in the hip on d day and was awarded the purple heart. no matter how we tried to bring it up, he would never talk about that day. he died a year ago. he was a man.

best ever use of hero tag. sniffle.
 
2007-06-06 11:59:35 AM  
Mordant

I got your point the first time. What I was objecting to is the use of the work "waste". It's sad that all the effort of his life was ended on the beach. It's sad that they will never realize the full potential of their lives. It's shocking, yes. But not a waste.
 
2007-06-06 11:59:58 AM  
I'd like to see Fred Phelps protest a WWII veteran's funeral. That would take care of *that* problem. *rat-a-tat-tat*
 
2007-06-06 12:00:00 PM  
They should make a movie about this.
 
2007-06-06 12:00:18 PM  
not enough words to say thank you in any meaningful sense.
 
2007-06-06 12:02:07 PM  
Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori.

May they rest in peace.

/note, though, I said nothing about dying for more venal things...'nuff said...
 
2007-06-06 12:02:08 PM  
Thank You

And a note for you Farkers:

Remember these guys and gals the next time you wind up behind them in a line or in traffic, they tell you to get off their lawn or you run into them at any point in your day.

/practices this 85% of the time
//working on that other 15
 
2007-06-06 12:02:31 PM  
Yeah, but they were fighting for something meaningful.
 
2007-06-06 12:02:45 PM  
It's always a sad thing when so many young lives are cut short. May the nations never forget them so that they may live forever.

RIP
 
2007-06-06 12:02:45 PM  
lefty201: not enough words to say thank you in any meaningful sense.

well said.
 
2007-06-06 12:04:13 PM  
I'm glad people are being civil thus far and not bringing their political garbage into this.

I am constantly thankful that there was a generation of men who were not afraid to fight for freedom. These people did a job that I will be the first to admit I could never do.

We're lucky to have had these people.
 
2007-06-06 12:04:21 PM  
/salute
 
2007-06-06 12:04:22 PM  
Mordant: It's just shocking that so much work and effort can be extinguished so instantly.

Can't speak for anyone else, but I at least know what you're getting at. Best friend I ever had died at 17 of a brain tumor. We had a lot of plans together, a lot of chapters yet to write. His book ended up being closed with two-thirds of it still blank.

I wrestled with that for a long time. Still do sometimes.

So I know where you're coming from.
 
2007-06-06 12:05:37 PM  
Thank God for good leadership and great leaders.

May we never engage in a needless and endless war.
 
2007-06-06 12:05:42 PM  
members.shaw.ca

Juno Beach
 
2007-06-06 12:06:15 PM  
Thank you, Tom Hanks and Matt Damon.
 
2007-06-06 12:07:11 PM  
I know the chances of a WWII vet reading Fark are very slim but, just...Thanks.
 
2007-06-06 12:07:15 PM  
From a military family, I can only hold their sacrifice in my heart and pray for their family's solace. May they be blessed.
 
2007-06-06 12:07:18 PM  
shim1.shutterfly.com

i think thats all there is to say.
 
2007-06-06 12:07:36 PM  
No matter how you feel about it...you cannot deny that those guys had balls of steel. Without their sacrifice most of Europe would now be learning the German national anthem.

Thank you.

And now most of them rot in retirement homes and VA hospitals, you white folk sure know how to honor your elders.
 
2007-06-06 12:07:38 PM  
i124.photobucket.com
 
2007-06-06 12:08:23 PM  
It is also 65 years since the end of The Battle of Midway, which in many ways was more significant than D-Day.
 
2007-06-06 12:08:55 PM  
They really were the greatest generation.

/Get the fark off of their lawns or they will slice you up like velveeta.
 
2007-06-06 12:09:20 PM  
Mordant

I can never think about something like that without being struck by the senseless waste. These kids lived their lives, went to school, prepared for some meaningful existence. Then they went through some degree of military training, faced new challenges in doing that, got all the way to Normandy... and so many of them never even made it off the boats.

As I've gotten older I've realized the fragility of life. Events like D-Day throw that fragility into sharp relief.

I can't rationalize that in my head and make it ok.

I think that means you're human. (No snark)
 
2007-06-06 12:09:24 PM  
Mordant: I can't rationalize that in my head and make it ok.

If you can't understand, go here (pops) and understand the reason one of the reasons why they were invading the beach.

There are some things worth dying for.
 
wee
2007-06-06 12:09:33 PM  
Mordant: We honor the heroes who saved lives, completed objectives, or whatever.

Last September I went on a 3 week tour of WWII European battlefields with Wild Bill Guarnere and Babe Hefron. When we were visiting the American cemetary in Luxembourg, the topic of heroes came up (I think it was in relation to the Marker-Garden jump; Babe was the first American in Eindhoven). Babe jerked his thumb over his shoulder towards the graves and said "No, no, no, you have it all wrong. The heroes? There's where the real heroes are, not here talkin' to ya..."

Talk to any WWII vet, they'll tell you the same thing. They know who the real heroes are, and they honor them. You had it right.

And yes, I had something in my eye that day.
 
2007-06-06 12:09:37 PM  
Rurouni: you white folk sure know how to honor your elders.

C'mon folks, someone had to be a dick in this thread.

/cracker ass cracker
 
2007-06-06 12:09:42 PM  
its mah birfday ahm an american freedom
 
2007-06-06 12:10:09 PM  
Thanks Vets!
 
2007-06-06 12:10:26 PM  
Thanks grandpas!
 
2007-06-06 12:11:11 PM  
Been to Normandy.
Words can't describe.
There would be beggary in any description I'd try.

Thanks.

/Thanks to U.K. and Canadian and French Resistance forces.
 
2007-06-06 12:11:33 PM  
We salute you.
 
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