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(Denver Post)   Radioactive emissions from a nuclear meltdown in California 47 years ago are worse than anybody thought. In other news, there was a nuclear meltdown in the US back in 1959   (denverpost.com) divider line 120
    More: Scary  
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23110 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 Oct 2006 at 3:09 PM (7 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2006-10-06 01:53:34 PM
www.comic-mint.com

Yar!
 
2006-10-06 01:58:11 PM
There was also Enrico Nuclear Generating Station in Michigan, in 1966, and 3 mile island, PA was as recent as '79.
 
2006-10-06 02:04:53 PM
He cited a Boeing-commissioned study released last year that found overall cancer deaths among employees at its Simi Valley Rocketdyne lab and Canoga Park facilities between 1949 and 1999 were lower than in the general population.

That's easy. If an employee is diagnosed with cancer, quietly fire them. See? No employee deaths from cancer!
 
2006-10-06 02:11:28 PM
I think the point might be that people were *informed* of those at the time - of TMI, at least. As opposed to "Wait, you didn't let the public know abt this for 20 years?" (Info on the '59 meltdown not released till '79 [actually, TMI might have something to do w/ that], and hasn't exactly been publicized since then.)

/if there's anything scarier than a nuclear meltdown, it's a nuclear meltdown that no one tells you about till you've been exposed to carcinogens for 20 years
//yeah, long slashy, I like slashes
 
2006-10-06 02:21:26 PM
I believe this was associated with Project Pluto, the closest America came to developing a first-strike nuclear missile.
 
2006-10-06 02:28:49 PM
alhazred: There was also Enrico Nuclear Generating Station in Michigan, in 1966

Adolph builds a bonfire, Enrico plays with it.

/my brother was crushed when he found out that song was about a game show and the names were randomly picked
 
2006-10-06 02:47:54 PM
Let's not forget about the SL-1 prompt criticality in Idaho in 1961 with one fatality and the fission product release from SM-1A in Alaska in 1972

/submitter was living within a mile of SM-1A in 1972
//submitter does not glow
///submitter operated S1C, S5W, and S5G class reactors in the Navy
 
2006-10-06 03:13:48 PM
Because you couldn't HANDLE the truth.
 
2006-10-06 03:13:48 PM
How are we supposed to evolve if we do not mutate?
 
2006-10-06 03:14:11 PM
Project Pluto was some scary stuff. The missile was just going to spew radiation out the back whenever the engine was on. When asked about how they were going to test it, the engineers were like "We'll just fly figure-eights over the Pacific and let it crash"
 
2006-10-06 03:14:19 PM
well isn't that special...
 
2006-10-06 03:15:25 PM
i33.photobucket.com

I'm getting a German Shephard
 
2006-10-06 03:15:43 PM
And I'm told the Simi Valley is a nice safe place to live, for some definitions of the words "safe" and "live."
 
2006-10-06 03:16:25 PM
Scary tag indeed. Not nuclear energy, I think it's the only way to power the U.S. in the future(I'm thinking pebble bed, discuss), but any "accident" is scary. Safe nuclear can be achieved. No, I'm not joking. Quit laughing in the back, there.
 
2006-10-06 03:17:02 PM
Some 20 to 40 tons of nuclear (sorry, nukular) material melted and were exposed directly to the atmosphere at Three Mile Island.

Full meltdowns such as these render an area the size of Pennsylvania uninhabitable for thousands of years, unless an insurance company decides to use the media to lie about the matter to limit liability.
 
2006-10-06 03:17:16 PM
this was on the History Channel a few weeks ago.
 
2006-10-06 03:17:22 PM
Wow, in Slimy Valley no less... I never would have guessed they had a nuke problem.
 
2006-10-06 03:17:27 PM
Project Pluto? Wasn't it recently downgraded to a dwarf project?
 
2006-10-06 03:17:36 PM
"shoulda seen it kids, looked like a big ol' glowin' gopher"
 
2006-10-06 03:18:08 PM
NikolaiFarkoff: "We'll just fly figure-eights over the Pacific and let it crash"


Ok now those guys can not work on my pebble bed reactor.
 
2006-10-06 03:19:17 PM
"Dad, the cat's gone bald"

"Shut up, so has your mother"
 
2006-10-06 03:19:42 PM
obvious
 
2006-10-06 03:20:10 PM
There has never been a meltdown,ever. It seems to be a common misconception. If there was a nuclear meltdown in california there would no longer be people living there.
 
2006-10-06 03:21:48 PM
Predalien
Some 20 to 40 tons of nuclear (sorry, nukular) material melted and were exposed directly to the atmosphere at Three Mile Island.

Full meltdowns such as these render an area the size of Pennsylvania uninhabitable for thousands of years, unless an insurance company decides to use the media to lie about the matter to limit liability.


So, uhh, Pennsylvania is uninhabitable for thousands of years?
 
2006-10-06 03:22:19 PM
This isn't a joke:

My grandfather was an aerospace engineer who worked for Boeing at that exact lab and ended up dying from brain cancer when he was in his late forties. My grandmother(his wife) ended up getting a brain tumor about 20 years later, was cured from chemo, but ended up wasting away due to Alzheimer's. My mom, aunt, and uncles all wondered if he might have 'brought something home' with him. There was a recent settlement and I know my mom's side of the family got some money. It's anecdotal but if you look at the statistics for brain tumor incidents it does seem kind of spooky that both my grandfather and grandmother came down with them. Fortunately there aren't any other incidents of cancer on that side.

I also lived in Simi from 85' to present(moved in between) and remember the rocket engine tests when I was a kid. They long since stopped doing them but you could hear and feel the loud rumble, go outside, and see smoke billowing up from the hill top.

I don't drink the tap water and now you know where I got my nick.
 
2006-10-06 03:22:23 PM
Mr. Clarence Butterworth: "Shut up, so has your mother"


"Clears the sinuses!"
 
2006-10-06 03:23:05 PM
Well, that certainly explains Simi Valley.
 
2006-10-06 03:23:35 PM
GBmanNC:

As a matter of fact, Chenobyl WAS a meltdown. Fortunately, it is more of a partial meltdown than a full one. No one has ever seen a FULL meltdown, you mean.
 
2006-10-06 03:23:40 PM
Mungoon: Wow, in Slimy Valley no less... I never would have guessed they had a nuke problem.

Yeah, if you go through the Santa Susana pass at night, you can sometimes see Redneck Zombies. Wearing mullets, mesh caps, and staggering around looking for some Bud Light.
 
2006-10-06 03:24:38 PM
My html-fu is weak but the meltdown in question occurred here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santa_Susana_Field_Laboratory


/Also a former D1G and S5W reactor operator.
 
2006-10-06 03:24:45 PM
tothekor: No one has ever seen a FULL meltdown, you mean.


Do not want.
 
2006-10-06 03:25:27 PM
EVERYBODY PANIC!

/relaxes and watches the glow from beautiful Marina Del Rey
 
2006-10-06 03:26:04 PM
Wow... Look at all the cool things Junior can do. Thank God he was born with that 3rd hand.....
 
2006-10-06 03:26:49 PM
GBmanNC

I'm no nuclear scientist, but according to Wikipedia, both Chernobyl and 3 mile island were meltdowns. Just because there's no explosion doesn't mean there's no meltdown.
 
2006-10-06 03:26:57 PM
Project Pluto, from Wikipedia:

Ceramic fuel elements would have to be used; the contract to manufacture the 500,000 pencil-sized elements was given to the Coors Porcelain Company, which would become better-known later for their brewery division.

/Insert your own joke here
 
2006-10-06 03:27:28 PM
They had the Simi Valley thing on TV about a month ago.

The building has now been taken down, and the area is now protected with a Somebody Else's Problem Field. You don't need to worry about it.

...


You have to remember that in the 1950's, we had atmospheric nuclear testing in the Nevada desert. Could you imagine that today? The country back then was nothing like it is now, not at all.

Back in the day, the Simi valley release wasn't considered a big deal by comparison. By today's standards, it's an issue.
 
2006-10-06 03:27:30 PM
oh yeah, and I'm aware Chernobyl is not in the US...

/just clarifying
 
2006-10-06 03:28:11 PM
Cancer rates don't lie.

Insurance companies do.
 
2006-10-06 03:28:19 PM
overCee: So, uhh, Pennsylvania is uninhabitable for thousands of years?

No that's New Jersey.
/I'm in Kansas - who am I too make fun of another state?
 
2006-10-06 03:28:42 PM
Boeing officials vigorously disputed the findings, saying they were based on miscalculations and faulty information.

www.uploadfile.info

nothing to see here. move along...
 
2006-10-06 03:28:45 PM
Was this the test facility I saw on the history channel where the guys pulled up the control rods manually to far and they impaled the guys into the ceiling?
 
2006-10-06 03:29:13 PM
The Simi Valley meltdown was a corebreach (Chernobyl-type) in which the liquid sodium coolant system failed because the seals mixed with the molten metal and turned it into kind of a goo.

This was a tiny, experimental reactor. If it had been any bigger than 1kW, we would have known about it long ago because half of the babies born in LA afterward would have had five eyes.
 
2006-10-06 03:30:45 PM
Oh, and BTW guys, The Ronald Reagan library is in Simi Valley where he is buried. I wouldn't be surprised if enough of the radiation gets to him and he'll be reanimated as a brain-sucking zombie sometime in the near future.

/literally right down the street from the library
//Keeping the cricket bat ready
 
2006-10-06 03:31:05 PM
Is there such a thing as a nuclear weapon system that WASN'T claimed to be, "first strike?" That damn phrase, when applied to nukes, is pretty silly. (Frex, "Red October," was the ideal second-strike weapon. And second-strike weapons is how you prevent nuclear wars.)
 
2006-10-06 03:32:07 PM
WOW, another "incident" occurred up that should have been disclosed immediately but was deemed unecessary or classified for "national security" or covered up for "special interests"?

People need to wake up, you are at the bottom of the list of their concerns. You are pliable sheep. You are expendable. When government is unaccountable and non-transparent and bought and paid for by monied interests, this will continmue to happen....God only knows what is still classified or has been done in our name.
 
2006-10-06 03:33:00 PM
Bonkthat_Again: I believe this was associated with Project Pluto, the closest America came to developing a first-strike nuclear missile.


I wonder if Project Pluto could have been involved with this accident too.
 
2006-10-06 03:34:10 PM
I wouldn't be surprised if enough of the radiation gets to him and he'll be reanimated as a brain-sucking zombie

When the dead rise, they tend to take on a different aspect than when they lived.
 
2006-10-06 03:35:50 PM
tothekor: No one has ever seen a FULL meltdown, you mean.

You've obviously never seen my wife during PMS.

/// I'm yust keedeeng!
 
2006-10-06 03:36:23 PM
cmcnabb314: Let's not forget about the SL-1 prompt criticality in Idaho in 1961

Was that the one where the dumbass technician pulled a control rod out by hand, and they found him pinned to the ceiling of the reactor by said control rod?

/Nuclear engineering is NOT seat of the pants
 
2006-10-06 03:36:42 PM
I, for one, welcome our new four-legged frog fetus overlords.
 
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