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(BBC)   The internet will be a thriving, low-cost network of billions of devices by 2020, all looking for Sarah Connor   (news.bbc.co.uk) divider line 74
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5931 clicks; posted to Main » on 24 Sep 2006 at 5:26 PM (7 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2006-09-24 02:22:24 PM
Don't bet on it...
 
2006-09-24 02:26:38 PM
Isn't that pretty much what it is now? Just replace "billions" with "millions"....
 
2006-09-24 02:29:31 PM
That kind of future hinges on how a world-wide change to IPv6 (or something other than IPv4). I have my doubts.
 
2006-09-24 05:28:24 PM
i look forward to the day when i can harness distributed processing for genomic analysis.
 
2006-09-24 05:34:18 PM
Last One Left: That kind of future hinges on how a world-wide change to IPv6 (or something other than IPv4). I have my doubts.

Well, with China pushing for a huge IPv6 rollout by the 2008 olympics, that may spur on other countries and companies to adopt sooner than later.
 
2006-09-24 05:34:46 PM
what is IPv6? someone?
 
2006-09-24 05:36:31 PM
ptrifoliata2
what is IPv6? someone?

A term you could have googled for a learned about in the amount of time it took you to type that.
 
2006-09-24 05:40:00 PM
2006-09-24 05:36:31 PM sinanju

ptrifoliata2
what is IPv6? someone?

A term you could have googled for a learned about in the amount of time it took you to type that.


yeah but all those pages talk about stuff like packet-space and addressibility.

what does ipv6 do for me? will my sneakers talk to my t-shirt via bluetooth ?
 
2006-09-24 05:40:17 PM
"Real interoperability will be contingent on replacing our bias for competition with one for collaboration. Until then, economics do not permit universal networking capability."


Humanity is incapable of collaborating, so this will never happen anyway.

It sounds nice though :)
 
2006-09-24 05:40:23 PM
LazloHollifeld: Well, with China pushing for a huge IPv6 rollout by the 2008 olympics, that may spur on other countries and companies to adopt sooner than later.

I certainly hope so. However, it won't work unless the US joins in, or supports IPv6 in another way, such as with IPv6-over-IPv4 encapsulation.
 
2006-09-24 05:42:01 PM
"IPv6-over-IPv4 encapsulation"

i'm making t-shirts.
 
2006-09-24 05:43:04 PM
ptrifoliata2: what does ipv6 do for me? will my sneakers talk to my t-shirt via bluetooth ?

Basically, IPv6 increases the number of addresses available. Theoretically, the number of addresses available with IPv6 should be enough to last us a few hundred years, at least.

IPv6 adds a bunch of other features, too, but nothing that should interest most users.
 
2006-09-24 05:43:50 PM
Isn't google buying up all the unused fiber that was laid back in 2002 (probably the same year many of you were laid too ;-) ) and hooking up all the datacenters?

I don't think we'll have IPv6 but Gglv1.
 
2006-09-24 05:43:51 PM
Churchill2004

Isn't that pretty much what it is now? Just replace "billions" with "millions"....

Nope, not even close. Right now it's a lot of very expensive wires, servers and routers which millions of cheap devices connect to.

I haven't RTFA, but presumably he's talking about an internet without those expensive wires, routers and servers... probably having them replaced by cheaper wireless technology, something like your router bounces to your neighbors, which bounces to the guy down the street, and so on until it reaches your destination.
 
2006-09-24 05:44:23 PM
submitter: The internet will be a thriving, low-cost network of billions of devices porn sites by 2020, all looking for Sarah Connor

/fixed
 
2006-09-24 05:46:33 PM
IPv6 supports 3.4×1038 addresses, or 5×1028(50 octillion) for each of the roughly 6.5 billion people alive today, or almost 57 billion addresses for each gram of matter in the Earth.

They said the same thing about fiber optics the late 80s, that it would take a long time but now in the first decade of the 21st century we are all seeing the fruits of their labor. Hurrah for progress!
 
2006-09-24 05:48:59 PM
Churchill2004: Isn't that pretty much what it is now?

No, moran, right now it's a series of tubes.

img462.imageshack.us
 
2006-09-24 05:50:15 PM
"We're perfectly capable of formulating widely honored social contracts that prohibit pointing telescopes through your neighbors'' windows.

Bullshiat. Malice or no malice, people are curious and nosy.

Social contracts are plastic and malleable. I believe that the driving force of most social contracts, reciprocity, is only effective when there is a sort of equilibrium between any given groups in a context. Example: Group A, made of 100 persons, is going to feel more 'empowered' to not honor a contract with Group B, made of 2 persons, because of the perceived lessened threat of reprisal. There might be other mitigating circumstances, like diffusion of responsibility, etc, that allow, through inaction, the effective participation of the entire given group.
 
2006-09-24 05:54:00 PM

IPv6 supports 3.4×1038 addresses, or 5×1028(50 octillion) for each of the roughly 6.5 billion people alive today, or almost 57 billion addresses for each gram of matter in the Earth.


You could give every star in the universe it's own IP address and still have enough leftover to give every planet around every star 10,000 more.
 
2006-09-24 05:54:08 PM
ptrifoliata2

what does ipv6 do for me? will my sneakers talk to my t-shirt via bluetooth ?

The idea behind IPv6 is that, yes, we would have enough unique internet addresses for your tshirt to talk to your shoes.

IPv4 (255.255.255.255 model) supports 4.3B addresses - not even enough to give every person their own.

IPv6 (hexadecimal model) supports 3.4O (octillian) addresses. Let's write that out for fun:

3,400,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000

That's about 57B addresses for each gram of matter on earth.

That's the whole point of IPv6.

Wikipedia has some good info.
 
2006-09-24 05:54:20 PM
maybe they're going to start using carbon nanotubes for the pipes that the horses go through.
 
2006-09-24 05:54:41 PM
FTA: More than half of respondents disagreed that English would become the lingua franca of the internet by 2020...

Speak English please. At least for this sentence!
 
2006-09-24 05:55:09 PM
will my sneakers talk to my t-shirt via bluetooth ?


This man is crazy. Anyone else want to sign the form to have him commited?

Crazy talk. Talking..shoes..that talk to t-shirts..
 
2006-09-24 05:55:42 PM
IPv6 (hexadecimal model) supports 3.4O (octillian) addresses. Let's write that out for fun:

3,400,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000


Great, so now I'll have to remember IP addresses like 192.143.124.12.2.213.21.134.212.9.87.4.18.60.5
 
2006-09-24 05:56:58 PM

Crazy talk. Talking..shoes..that talk to t-shirts..


They already have belts that display messages and flash when your cell phone receives a new SMS message -- displaying the contents of that message on the belt. I can't imagine this is too far away.
 
2006-09-24 05:59:47 PM
aphexcoil3: Great, so now I'll have to remember IP addresses like 192.143.124.12.2.213.21.134.212.9.87.4.18.60.5

No, don't be silly. You will be able to use your socks as DNS servers.
 
2006-09-24 06:00:56 PM
IPv6. Yeah, one would suppose that the number of addresses would last for a long time. The design intent might not be age so much as given availability-- after all, how many permanent networked deviced would we have that would last hundres of years? That is assuming that IP will last fifty years. The idea is to have a handful of addresses for every square meter on the planet. This would allow for personal networked embedded devices in anything you could think of as well as in business, industrial, military applications, whatever.
 
2006-09-24 06:01:39 PM
okay, so the internets are getting biggers. i see. now to go make some talking shirts.
 
2006-09-24 06:02:00 PM
abnormalia: Crazy talk. Talking..shoes..that talk to t-shirts..

My shoes have tongues. Doesn't sound so crazy now, does it.
 
2006-09-24 06:02:28 PM
damn beaten to the tubes reference, nice jorb
 
2006-09-24 06:02:54 PM
2006-09-24 05:59:47 PM Last One Left [TotalFark]

aphexcoil3: Great, so now I'll have to remember IP addresses like 192.143.124.12.2.213.21.134.212.9.87.4.18.60.5

No, don't be silly. You will be able to use your socks as DNS servers.


socks cost too much to register with. i recommend registering your dns with your hat, it has better rates and less downtime.
 
2006-09-24 06:03:42 PM
Last One Left: No, don't be silly. You will be able to use your socks as DNS servers.

Heh heh. Sweet.
 
2006-09-24 06:04:40 PM
On stage, Peter Frampton uses a synthesized voice to create the
illusion that his guitar "talks" while playing.

Jimbo: Man, that guy's guitar is talking.
Otto: Hey, my shoes are talking too!
Left Shoe: Don't worry. We won't hurt you.
Right Shoe: We only want to have some fun.
-- "Homerpalooza"
 
2006-09-24 06:06:05 PM
ptrifoliata2: socks cost too much to register with. i recommend registering your dns with your hat, it has better rates and less downtime.

You can only wear one hat. Socks are great because you can use one as a primary server and one as a secondary server. Plus, if I double-up on my socks, I can use load-balancing.

Now imagine a Beowulf cluster of those...
 
2006-09-24 06:07:31 PM
The Pew report on the future internet surveyed 742 experts in the fields of computing, politics and business.

PEWP THREAD!
 
2006-09-24 06:07:40 PM
pocketfluff: No, moran, right now it's a series of tubes.
www.uploadfile.info
And if you don't understand those tubes can be filled and if they are filled, when you put your message in, it gets in line and its going to be delayed by anyone that puts into that tube enormous amounts of material, enormous amounts of material.
 
2006-09-24 06:07:57 PM
spectrum has a point...
 
2006-09-24 06:20:18 PM
<i>spectrum has a point...</i>

Except he really doesn't have any proof to back it up. I know I haven't really noticed a slowdown since everyone and their dog started getting broadband. It just seems like someone is trying to get rich quick.
 
2006-09-24 06:24:20 PM
insane_idoru submitter: The internet will be a thriving, low-cost network of billions of porn device sites by 2020, all looking for Sarah Connor


/last draft good
//but still needed work.
 
2006-09-24 06:42:38 PM
Almost 60% said that a counter culture of Luddites would emerge, some resorting to violence.

What?
 
2006-09-24 06:43:41 PM
us.i1.yimg.com
 
2006-09-24 06:44:05 PM
Even with 3.4 octillion addresses, we will just end up allocating 1 septillion to large companies, and we will have the same old address shortage as before.

It's really just poor management.
 
2006-09-24 06:49:45 PM
The Internets become self aware in 3 . . . 2 . . . 1 . . .
 
2006-09-24 06:53:21 PM
learn2subnet
learn2one-to-many nat
learn2portforward
 
2006-09-24 06:54:01 PM
Last One Left: You can only wear one hat. Socks are great because you can use one as a primary server and one as a secondary server. Plus, if I double-up on my socks, I can use load-balancing.

Now imagine a Beowulf cluster of those...


Yeah, but wouldn't you now have a heat problem?
 
2006-09-24 06:54:23 PM
Now only if the human race could network their collective consciousness into a beta program that would allow them to preserve homeostasis and tolerance.
 
2006-09-24 07:02:47 PM
2006-09-24 06:54:23 PM plutonium238

Now only if the human race could network their collective consciousness into a beta program that would allow them to preserve homeostasis and tolerance.


binaural beat meditation using tuned frequencies.
 
2006-09-24 07:04:37 PM
Last One Left: Basically, IPv6 increases the number of addresses available. Theoretically, the number of addresses available with IPv6 should be enough to last us a few hundred years, at least.

IPv6 adds a bunch of other features, too, but nothing that should interest most users.


Which I find is wishful thinking. Know what will happen with IPV6? Even though your ISP could give you a nice block for your home network, he won't - he'll still give you one damn address, so you'll still be struggling with NAT and routers, only now

a) your IP addys are too long and convoluted to memorize, making NAT configuring more painful, and

b) NAT support has gone down the tubes because everybody expected to be done with that crap when IPV6 rolled out.

I'm looking forward to IPV6 setting forth a whole new universe of underutilized IP addresses.
 
2006-09-24 07:04:47 PM
raged: spectrum has a point...

nacker: Except he really doesn't have any proof to back it up. I know I haven't really noticed a slowdown since everyone and their dog started getting broadband. It just seems like someone is trying to get rich quick.

I can prove that my shoes have tongues. Beyond that, you've completely lost me.
 
2006-09-24 07:16:27 PM
2020? I'm playing a solo!
 
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