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(NASA)   Voyager 1 now 9.3 billion miles away from the sun, still won't ask for directions   (jpl.nasa.gov) divider line 37
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1458 clicks; posted to Geek » on 17 Aug 2006 at 9:12 AM (8 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2006-08-17 04:26:55 AM  
Good headline!
 
2006-08-17 04:28:25 AM  
What on god's green earth is this supposed to tell us?

www.jpl.nasa.gov
 
2006-08-17 04:38:31 AM  
glenlivid, it shows the rough position of the probes in position to the three main features that mark the edge of the solar system.

duh.

/iirc, the probes are still operating on some obscenly small amount of power. something like 1/billionth of an average digital watch.
//those RTGs look down upon the Energizer bunny with great disdain.
 
2006-08-17 04:39:31 AM  
Boy, was it rough when my mom went through heliopause. The hot flashes were...what?
I'm not even going to describe what I do with my heliosheath.
 
2006-08-17 04:45:38 AM  
For an old joke that headline cracked me up. +1

glenlivid: What on god's green earth is this supposed to tell us?

Jesus f*ck! It looks like that shockwave's about to destroy us!! *flees in terror*

What IS that thing?? Did God blow up just outside the solar system??
 
2006-08-17 04:48:47 AM  
Queue Star Trek references to V'ger in 3 ... 2 ... 1 ...
 
2006-08-17 04:50:54 AM  
Vin Diesel: What IS that thing?? Did God blow up just outside the solar system??



Highly exaggerated to be visible is what it is. You're talking about EM phenomon that you could be in the middle of and never notice.
 
2006-08-17 04:58:17 AM  
Churchill2004: "it shows the rough position of the probes in position to the three main features that mark the edge of the solar system."

I had no idea our solar system looked like an amoeba about to catch fire. Duh indeed!

All we are is dust in the wind.
 
2006-08-17 05:01:49 AM  
glenlivid: I had no idea our solar system looked like an amoeba about to catch fire. Duh indeed!

All we are is dust in the wind.




Well, like I said all of that is really invisible and obscenely hard to detect. If you were that far out all you would see is an abnormally bright star.
 
2006-08-17 05:52:30 AM  
shouldn't it be pause, sheath, then shock?

and IIRC massage and rub are in there somewhere
 
2006-08-17 07:13:46 AM  
Isn't this how the Borg got started by Voyager?
 
2006-08-17 09:23:42 AM  
log_jammin: shouldn't it be pause, sheath, then shock?

It is in that order if you're going in from outside.
 
2006-08-17 09:25:28 AM  
Serious question.

How the hell slow is data transmission on these things?
 
2006-08-17 09:37:26 AM  
mandrsn1

They haven't gotten data from them in quite a few
years, but that's mostly because the mission
people can't afford the time on the deep space
receiver network to pick up the signals. Towards
the end of their active life, it took several
hours to receive the equivalent of a few thousand
bytes of information from some of the sensors
(the cameras apparently burned out long ago).

Personally, I'm in this thread for the pics of
Jeri Ryan
 
2006-08-17 09:38:11 AM  
I have read an article about that red "fluff" in that picture is possibly remnants of supernova that helped to create our sun. The tempurature is around 7000K but the density is such that you would not know why you are being flash burned.

Linky in case you want to read it.(pops)
 
2006-08-17 10:00:54 AM  
DjangoStonereaver: They haven't gotten data from them in quite a few
years


Not true. NASA is in regular contact with Voyager 1 and 2, and they continue to return extremely useful science data. [Even though a number of the more power-hungry instruments have been permanently turned off.]

You might be thinking of Pioneer / Mariner... Before they failed (in the last few years), NASA was in irregular contact with them, and their missions were basically over.
 
2006-08-17 10:21:59 AM  
memory-alpha.org
 
2006-08-17 10:42:02 AM  
Churchill2004:
A little searching told me that they originally were operating on 420 watts, and are still putting out around 290 watts, apparently.

I loves me some plutonium. Why isn't it in my car yet?

/Hates solar panels
//which probably would be putting out a fraction of a watch battery worth of power at 100AU's
 
2006-08-17 10:43:29 AM  
mandrsn1: How the hell slow is data transmission on these things?

According to the JPL page here, the current data rate for science data is 160 bps (bits/s). I actually thought that it'd be slower by now given the distance, 160 bps is really quite impressive to this EE.

Churchill2004, the Voyager probes are pretty damned energy efficient, but they don't operate on "something like 1/billionth of an average digital watch.". Check out the the link posted by Fnord above; the RTGs on both probes are producing in the neighbourhood of 290 Watts (BTW thanks for the link Fnord).
 
2006-08-17 10:52:55 AM  
There's still a guy whose job it is to be the voyager project manager? what does this guy do on a daily basis?
"yup, it's still going. hey i wonder what's on fark?"
 
2006-08-17 11:05:54 AM  
Did they find the creator?

/couldn't resist
//am just a simple carbon unit. :(
 
2006-08-17 11:46:07 AM  
Just as long as they dont launch a probe named Nomad.

/ obscure?
 
2006-08-17 12:06:29 PM  
Vyger, it's spelled Vyger, dammit!
 
2006-08-17 01:11:20 PM  
Great use of an old joke!
 
2006-08-17 01:18:38 PM  
I had never heard of the termination shock, heliopause, heliosheath or bow shock before. Fark is one of the most educational sites I know of, followed closely by Foobies.

/ Hooray science
// Go nerds!
 
2006-08-17 01:25:55 PM  
9.3 billion miles is less than half a millieparsec! That is not really very far. Even only going at full lightspeed you would get there in less than 14 hours. Wake me when they reach Alpha Centauri or something.
 
2006-08-17 02:13:57 PM  
" The Voyagers owe their longevity to their nuclear power sources, called radioisotope thermoelectric generators"

OK, these things were built 30 farkin' years ago. Why aren't we using these things in our cars by now?

I mean, really.
 
2006-08-17 02:15:12 PM  
AwfulJackass:


There's still a guy whose job it is to be the voyager project manager? what does this guy do on a daily basis?
"yup, it's still going. hey i wonder what's on fark?"


Yes because they only have nearly 30 years of data to look at not to mention probably the most interesting coming in now because of how far out the probes are. We are getting back data from the edge of the solar system but the poor project guys they have nothing to do but sit around and twiddle their thumbs.
 
2006-08-17 02:25:57 PM  
Parallax: OK, these things were built 30 farkin' years ago. Why aren't we using these things in our cars by now?

I mean, really.



upload.wikimedia.org

Behold, the Ford Nucleon!

The main reason is that the fuel is plutonium. Not a big deal if something bad happens to it 9.3 billion miles away. Slightly bigger problem when you crash your plutonium fueled car into a farmer's market and give everyone within a few hundred yards a lethal dose of radiation.
 
2006-08-17 02:35:40 PM  
The Ford Nucleon just needs to be updated a little:

img.photobucket.com
 
2006-08-17 02:36:07 PM  
Fnord:

You are correct. I got Pioneer 10 & 11 mixed up
with the Voyagers.

Its a testament to the US of A that at the same
time that we were building the worst cars in the
world, we were building the best spacecraft evar
(the only spaceship better was the Galileo, which
was described as 'The Cadillac of deep space
probes', and was the last product of the glory
days of JPL).

Now, then: where are the 7 of 9 schematics, people!
 
2006-08-17 03:06:58 PM  
Well then you'll be sorry to hear that the budget for monitoring these probes was due to be eliminated and folded into the Bush Moon-Mars effort. Just when these probes are in a very interesting and hard to reach place in our solar system, they want to cut the program completely. They say a future probe will be sent out the same way some day, but besides the decades of flight time that might take, there is no guarantee that future probe is ever going to be built on the forseeable budget. Meanwhile, there is data to be collected and analyzed, data that may teach us very wonderful and useful things we can't yet imagine. And why throw away the chance to get these extra data points, essentially "for free", instead of counting on just one more future probe's data that may never come into being?

My friend used to call that kind of thinking "stepping over dollars to pick up dimes".

Leave the funding for deep space probes alone, let's not make all science and research a zero-sum game.
 
2006-08-17 03:28:59 PM  
upload.wikimedia.org

We succeeded in taking that picture [from deep space], and, if you look at it, you see a dot. That's here. That's home. That's us. On it, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever lived, lived out their lives. The aggregate of all our joys and sufferings, thousands of confident religions, ideologies and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilizations, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every hopeful child, every mother and father, every inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every superstar, every supreme leader, every saint and sinner in the history of our species, lived there on a mote of dust, suspended in a sunbeam.

The earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that in glory and in triumph they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of the dot on scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner of the dot. How frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds. Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the universe, are challenged by this point of pale light.

Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity -- in all this vastness -- there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves. It is up to us. It's been said that astronomy is a humbling, and I might add, a character-building experience. To my mind, there is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly and compassionately with one another and to preserve and cherish that pale blue dot, the only home we've ever known.

-Carl Sagan
Excerpted from a commencement address delivered May 11, 1996.
Image from Voyager 1, 1990.
 
2006-08-17 07:08:12 PM  
Hagar:

thanks, puts life into a little perspective.

Life is short, small and very insignificant. Enjoy it while you can.

/Lukewarm
 
2006-08-17 07:13:21 PM  
So cool. I miss the heyday of space exploration ( 1969-1976 ). We were really cool back then.

--- what the hell happened? ---
 
2006-08-17 11:46:13 PM  
CrazyCurt

So cool. I miss the heyday of space exploration ( 1969-1976 ). We were really cool back then.

Yeah it's a drag now. I mean, the latest space news story has been the search for better quality video of the Moon landing. WTF?

Reruns. That's what we want to watch.

Still, I think Apollo will turn out to be American's civ's greatest wonder. At least until we rack up extra points with Future Tech.
 
2006-08-18 02:07:43 PM  
memory-alpha.org

Ilia approves.
 
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