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(What the Dickens)   A collection of 150 everyday expressions from Shakespeare's plays   (lomonico.com ) divider line
    More: Interesting  
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22004 clicks; posted to Main » on 03 Jun 2006 at 6:30 AM (10 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



107 Comments     (+0 »)
 


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2006-06-02 11:32:28 AM  
As flies to wanton boys are we to the gods

Use this one practically every day myself...

/uhm
 
2006-06-02 04:35:22 PM  
My salad days, when I was green in judgment

Huh?
 
2006-06-02 04:55:07 PM  
"A little pot and soon hot"

Works with beer too.
 
2006-06-02 04:55:23 PM  
151: "Nothing will come of nothing." Pretty common, I think.
 
2006-06-02 04:58:52 PM  
Gosling: My salad days, when I was green in judgment

Huh?


"When I was younger and not as smrt"
 
2006-06-02 06:13:32 PM  
"I look like a bassett, when long and flacid, what am I?"

-As You Like It.
 
2006-06-02 06:14:01 PM  
A LOT of them are everyday phrases...the REST of them are everyday phrases used by COLLEGE PROFESSORS. ;)

But a Good 2/3rds I'd wager are everyday expressions.
 
2006-06-02 07:52:21 PM  
Not quite 150. A few are duplicated:

A foregone conclusion-Othello and
Foregone conclusion-Othello

Then the far more obvious:

Paint the lily-King John and
Paint the lily-King John

Not sure how many more there are, those are just the ones I picked up on a quick glance.
 
2006-06-02 08:32:09 PM  
While he never seems to get the respect he deserves for this and I'm sick of having to always point it out, he also inspired the following titles of gay porn films:

There's The Rub
Come Full Circle
Every Inch a King
Flaming Youth
It Was Greek to Me
Short and the Long of It
Strange Bedfellows
The Naked Truth
What a Piece of Work is a Man
When Shall We Three Meet Again?
 
2006-06-02 09:44:24 PM  
To be, or not to be: that is the question-Hamlet

abclocal.go.com
 
2006-06-02 10:50:03 PM  
Peaceboy,
Don't forget Milk of human kindness and Once more into the breach

/drunk
 
2006-06-03 01:56:10 AM  
I find a comfort that phrases in use 500 years ago are still in use. It provides a sense of continuity - and there is "nothing new under the sun".
 
2006-06-03 01:57:55 AM  
BTW - "nothing new under the sun" is from Ecclesiastes 1:9-14 NIV. Anybody know when THAT was written?
 
2006-06-03 06:34:13 AM  
That was a lot less interesting than I expected it to be.
 
2006-06-03 06:35:57 AM  
I know, I know!

6000 years ago.

Did I mention I'm home schooled?
 
2006-06-03 06:42:10 AM  
Peaceboy: he also inspired the following titles of gay porn films:


I'm, uh... impressed... that you would know that.
 
2006-06-03 06:58:25 AM  
The first thing we do, let's kill all the lawyers-Henry VI, part 2

Beautiful.
 
2006-06-03 06:59:14 AM  
what we percieve as clever. are just just the "fo' shizzle mah nizzle" of the time. all of these qoutes can probably be attributed to others of the era if only theyad been able to spell.
 
2006-06-03 07:03:50 AM  
asmorex: what we percieve as clever. are just just the "fo' shizzle mah nizzle" of the time

Gat back to us in 2506, when 'fo' shizzle mah nizzle' is lumped together with Shakespeare.

/Pfffft
 
2006-06-03 07:04:01 AM  
Unsex me here-Macbeth

What?!? Nobody has ever said that to me, and -- not really knowing what it means -- I'm glad of that!
 
2006-06-03 07:08:49 AM  
What, no "pound of flesh"?
 
2006-06-03 07:18:12 AM  
There's The Rub
Come Full Circle
Every Inch a King
Flaming Youth
It Was Greek to Me
Short and the Long of It
Strange Bedfellows
The Naked Truth
What a Piece of Work is a Man
When Shall We Three Meet Again?


I see your gay porn titles and raise you

Titles of Epic Movies in the Porn Section! tm

A tower of strength
Come what may
Crack of doom
Dog will have its day
Elbow room
Get thee to a nunnery
Give the devil his due
Hold a candle to
It smells to heaven
My own flesh and blood
Once more unto the breach
There is a tide in the affairs of men
They say an old man is twice a child
 
2006-06-03 07:19:01 AM  
"Make the beast with two backs" - Othello.

Yep, really.
 
2006-06-03 07:20:41 AM  
meekychuppet: What, no "pound of flesh"?

Yeah really, that's a major oversight.


One of my favorite Shakespeare quotes, though hardly an everyday saying:

O, it is excellent
To have a giant's strength; but it is tyrannous
To use it like a giant.

- Measure for Measure
 
2006-06-03 07:23:51 AM  
Also, no "If music be the food of love..."?

WTF?
 
2006-06-03 07:24:09 AM  
I've always been a big fan of:

"Sorrow hath less power to bite the man who mocks at it and sets it light." - John of Gaunt, Richard II
 
2006-06-03 07:25:07 AM  
"As private parts to the gods are we. They play with us for their sport." - Lord Melchett
 
2006-06-03 07:26:32 AM  
Articles like this getting greenlit restore a little of my faith in teh intarwebs.
 
2006-06-03 07:38:20 AM  
So "what the dickens" has nothing to do with Charles Dickens (1812-70) !
 
2006-06-03 07:38:32 AM  
The more interesting question is how many of them are not original with Shakespeare?
 
zz9
2006-06-03 07:39:39 AM  
"fark me gently with a chainsaw" Wasn't that one of his?
 
2006-06-03 07:41:01 AM  
God I hate Shakespeare. The first thing I'm going to do when I build my time machine is go back and kill his mother before he's born.
 
2006-06-03 07:45:55 AM  
Mugato: The first thing I'm going to do when I build my time machine is go back and kill his mother before he's born.

First you'd have to figure out who he really was. William Shakespeare of Stratford upon Avon, was some actual man but almost certainly not the playright and poet. So you'd have to do some digging around to find out just who it was.
 
2006-06-03 07:46:15 AM  
Mugato: God I hate Shakespeare. The first thing I'm going to do when I build my time machine is go back and kill his mother before he's born.

Why do you hate Shakespeare?

/that is the question
 
2006-06-03 08:09:49 AM  
JustinCase: I find a comfort that phrases in use 500 years ago are still in use. It provides a sense of continuity

I was reading a article that maintains that the reason we can still read Shakespere is because of Shakespere. That he slowed down the change that happens in language. Almost as if people did not want to lose the ability to understand what he wrote.

Look at Chaucer. 200 years before Shakespere but you can't read it in the original. It is almost a foreign language. But most educated people can read Shakespere and only need a few footnotes for an occasional archaic term. English has been remarkably unchanged for 400 years.

The main problem modern people have with understanding Shakespere is not the words but the fact that he wrote for an audience that knew Roman mythology and history in great detail. So we miss the metaphors.

Also, remember that these are plays (except for the sonnets). They were meant to be performed, not read. Sometimes reading plays makes it hard to understand. Much better to watch
 
2006-06-03 08:11:58 AM  
"The path of the righteous man is beset on all sides by the iniquities of the selfish and the tyranny of evil men. Blessed is he who in the name of charity and good will shepherds the weak through the valley of darkness, for he is truly his brother's keeper and the finder of lost children. And I will strike down upon thee with great vengeance and furious anger those who attempt to poison and destroy my brothers. And you will know my name is the LORD when I lay my vengeance upon thee." -- Brutus in Julius Caesar

Now you know where Quentin got it. All stories emanate from Shakespeare.
 
2006-06-03 08:17:53 AM  
This seems a propos: the Shakespearean Insult Generator. Have fun with it, thou roguish malmsey-nosed wagtail!
 
2006-06-03 08:21:56 AM  
Thou mewling fly-bitten jolt-head!
 
2006-06-03 08:22:31 AM  
WhyteRaven74

First you'd have to figure out who he really was. William Shakespeare of Stratford upon Avon, was some actual man but almost certainly not the playright and poet. So you'd have to do some digging around to find out just who it was.


Er... no.

I bet you love the Da Vinci code too.
 
2006-06-03 08:22:58 AM  
I read once that 10% of Shakespeare's words are neologisms.
 
2006-06-03 08:26:59 AM  
Hamlet is my favorite character in any play or movie I've ever seen or book I've ever read. I hate it when people try to boil down his essence to indecision.

Also I hate it when people universally snub Shakespeare just because it's taught in school and difficult.
 
2006-06-03 08:27:12 AM  
I love 'the scottish play'

'Things at the worst will cease, or else climb upward to what they were before'

and

'Though all things foul would wear the brows of grace, yet grace must still look so'

and my favorite

'out, out, brief candle!
life's but a walking shadow, a poor player that struts and frets his hour upon the stage, and then is heard no more: it is a tale, told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing.'

Pretty much sums up politician's in a nutshell don't it!
 
2006-06-03 08:28:17 AM  
"Strong drink giveth the desire but taketh away the ability"

I liked my grandfathers "can't shoot pool with a rope" better though.
 
2006-06-03 08:28:38 AM  
Thou venomed dizzy-eyed flap-dragon!
 
2006-06-03 08:29:25 AM  
JustinCase said: BTW - "nothing new under the sun" is from Ecclesiastes 1:9-14 NIV. Anybody know when THAT was written?

PunGent relies: I know, I know!6000 years ago. Did I mention
I'm home schooled?

Kenposan says: All hail the mighty home school system! Ecclesiates dates to around 935 BC and the earliest recordings are about 3500 years ago. Even my public school education tells me that 3500 years ago isn't 6000 years ago.
 
2006-06-03 08:34:52 AM  
The_Philosopher_King: Look at Chaucer. 200 years before Shakespere but you can't read it in the original.

You can kind of read it ... if you know a bit of german... but if you listen to it you can tell middle english is a massivly different language... painfuly different
example of text and some audio files.
 
2006-06-03 08:44:04 AM  
What, no sonnets?

The expense of spirit in a waste of shame
Is lust in action; and till action, lust
Is perjured, murderous, bloody, full of blame,
Savage, extreme, rude, cruel, not to trust;
Enjoy'd no sooner but despised straight;
Past reason hunted; and no sooner had,
Past reason hated, as a swallowed bait,
On purpose laid to make the taker mad:
Mad in pursuit, and in possession so;
Had, having, and in quest to have, extreme;
A bliss in proof, and proved, a very woe;
Before, a joy proposed; behind, a dream.

All this the world well knows; yet none knows well
To shun the heaven that leads men to this hell.

Boobies
 
2006-06-03 08:51:51 AM  
gas333 'Boobies'????

I've never seen a more succinct summation of the bards work.

Bravo
 
2006-06-03 08:53:15 AM  
A friend of mine had a poster that had a bunch of Shakespearean insults. Most of them were pretty damn funny.

No time for html. And watch out for pops.

http://www.william-shakespeare.org.uk/shakespeare-insults-dictionary.h​tm
 
2006-06-03 08:54:55 AM  
jkaoclobb: I hate it when people try to boil down his essence to indecision.

Is the map the territory?
 
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