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(Some Guy)   The 100 most influential people in history and their religions   (adherents.com ) divider line
    More: Interesting  
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38768 clicks; posted to Main » on 23 May 2006 at 2:31 AM (10 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2006-05-22 08:31:34 PM  
"Jesus Christ *"

JESUS JUICED!!
 
2006-05-22 08:38:08 PM  
It left out Nixon. Think what you will about him, he's damn influential in modern history.
And he was a Quaker.

Which just goes to show you that religion doesn't really mean squat.
 
2006-05-22 08:38:44 PM  
No Mormons that I saw.
 
2006-05-22 08:42:25 PM  
Hey Homer's on the list. Oops, different Homer...
 
2006-05-22 08:43:08 PM  
2. Isaac Newton

3. Jesus Christ

This is going to piss somebody off.
 
2006-05-22 08:44:20 PM  
pigeonstopper: This is going to piss somebody off.

He did a good job explaining it though.
 
2006-05-22 08:47:15 PM  
I, for one, am pleased to see Greco-Roman Paganism as well represented as it is.
 
2006-05-22 09:00:32 PM  
Sort of interesting that Gorbachev is so far down
 
2006-05-22 09:07:16 PM  
How come William T.G. Morton is ranked 37? he doesn't even have a religion listed!
 
2006-05-22 10:47:54 PM  
pigeonstopper: 2. Isaac Newton

3. Jesus Christ

This is going to piss somebody off.


Well, to be fair, Jesus didn't invent gravity.
 
2006-05-22 11:05:45 PM  
FTA: John F. Kennedy - Catholic - U.S. President who led first successful effort by humans to travel to another planet

The Moon counts as "another planet"? Seriously.
 
2006-05-22 11:10:01 PM  
Well, this is a lot better than the list of the 1000 great achievements of the Islamic world, which was supposed to show the positive impact the religion has had on the world, but mostly featured inventions from pre-Muhammad times or from non-Muslims living in predominantly Muslim countries, and almost nothing from any Muslim in the past 300 years. It did show what mixing totalitarian governments and strictly enforced religion beliefs leads to: an almost complete lack of innovation.
 
2006-05-22 11:16:48 PM  
Okay, now I can't take the list seriously. Besides the whole "Moon is another planet" thing, look at the 100 Greatest Heroes list linked on the site. #5 is Ronald Reagan, #15 George W Bush, #94 Oliver North.

Meanwhile, MLK is #47, Audie Murphy is #32, Thomas Jefferson is #50.
 
2006-05-22 11:45:58 PM  
Anyone else note that about 2/3 of that list are Christians of one type or another?

I think it's interesting that people break up Christianity into different doctrines (baptist, catholic, presb...however you spell it) and say that they are Religions
 
2006-05-23 12:32:43 AM  
newton didn't invent gravity

lincoln should be up there, led the way for human rights stuff..
 
2006-05-23 12:37:58 AM  
No Joseph Smith? No Mormons?

The American landscape (especially the West) would be a totally different place if not for the Mormons. Utah would probably be Nevada Jr.

A Mormon, Philo T. Farnsworth, invented TV. Television has no historical impact in this list? He's mentioned way down in the article if you do a CTRL-F.

/no longer Mormon. but still, their impact on American culture is way more than negligible.
 
2006-05-23 02:36:12 AM  
persons?
 
2006-05-23 02:39:00 AM  
That was much less interesting than I expected.
 
2006-05-23 02:39:40 AM  
ch4r7ie
newton didn't invent gravity

Wow no kidding? Man, I thought Newton invented gravity. You're a smart cookie, aren't ya?
 
2006-05-23 02:42:22 AM  
Okay, now I can't take the list seriously. Besides the whole "Moon is another planet" thing, look at the 100 Greatest Heroes list linked on the site. #5 is Ronald Reagan, #15 George W Bush, #94 Oliver North.

Meanwhile, MLK is #47, Audie Murphy is #32, Thomas Jefferson is #50.


Uh... wtf?
 
2006-05-23 02:43:04 AM  
I don't buy Jesus at #3. Even if you aren't religous, no one can argue the impact Jesus has had on the world.

He has influenced our European (and derivatives) culture so much it's insane. Interestingly, he didn't influence the Middle East very much, which is where he's from.
 
2006-05-23 02:43:18 AM  
I knew i couldn't take this list seriously when I read this gem:

Edward de Vere
a.k.a. William Shakespeare

Riiiiiiight. If you believe that crap I've got a bridge I'd like to sell you...
 
2006-05-23 02:45:13 AM  
81 John F. Kennedy Catholic U.S. President who led first successful effort by humans to travel to another planet

the moon is a planet now?
 
2006-05-23 02:46:12 AM  
flatt, Jesus could defy gravity.

I agree with you xen0blue, without Jesus's religion, there would have been to church to retain the ability to learn during the Dark Ages and the world would be very different.
 
2006-05-23 02:47:04 AM  
I would say if Jesus is going to be on the list, Krishna might as well be on it too. Not a positive or negative comment, just a judgement call, considering they have about the same amount of historical evidence, and Krishna's influence impacts around a billion people today. Or did I just not read the criteria for inclusion in the list? It's past 2:30AM, so that's entirely possible.
 
2006-05-23 02:48:19 AM  
The moon belongs to America.
 
2006-05-23 02:49:58 AM  
Trying to say that a lot of these guys were such and such a religion is probably a pretty tough sell once you really get down to it. Most of them were nominally something, but whatever label was stuck on them probably doesnt describe their beliefs that well. Especially many of the Catholics where it was more or less mandatory that they were Catholic in their countries. Even when thats the case, people could have beliefs that were a lot more complicated than giving them their little label would indicate. For example, Newton was probably some flavor of a deist.
 
2006-05-23 02:50:21 AM  
I never knew Darwin was Anglican, since he openly stated he was agnostic. Strange that.
 
2006-05-23 02:51:26 AM  
I don't understand how Isaac Newton is more influential than the founders of religions with millions of adherents throughout the centuries. I mean, his theories had a huge impact, but still...

He has influenced our European (and derivatives) culture so much it's insane. Interestingly, he didn't influence the Middle East very much, which is where he's from.

A prophet is loved but in his own country?
 
2006-05-23 02:51:52 AM  
I guess everyone missed this lil juicy tidbit at the bottom:
"Charles Benedetti wrote:

I predict that the most influential person of all time will be L. Ron Hubbard, founder of the Church of Scientology (1954). It may take 10 years, or 25 or 50, but that day will surely come. I make this statement after 20 years of experiencing and drawing from the deep reservoir of this spiritual philosophy and Wisdom. Only those who have experienced Scientology would understand these words, and therefore I would not expect others to understand or agree with me. For those who may seek to know more about Scientology, see my website: www.our-home.org/charliebenedetti. "

Obviously this guy never saw Battlefield Earth.
 
2006-05-23 02:53:02 AM  
Good point, unstoppableV, but I think saying that if Muhammed is on the list, than Krishna should be. Prior to the discovery of oil in the Middle East, Muhammed and Krishna's influences were both left to the certain areas, unlike the massive world-wide influence Jesus had on the Europeans during the Age of Exploration.
 
2006-05-23 02:53:08 AM  
UnstoppableV

Jesus almost certainly existed as a historical person. The VAST majority of historians agree. Krishna almost certainly did not. Pretty much any sane person would agree with that. Thats why. Whether or not you believe that Jesus was the son of God and all that isnt really that important for the list.
 
2006-05-23 02:54:44 AM  
Number 3?

This makes...

www.iamaphex.net
 
2006-05-23 02:55:53 AM  
What the hell is the point of this list?

Umm...to initiate discussion of the importance of various prominent individuals throught human history?

/just a guess...
 
2006-05-23 02:56:02 AM  
Interesting that Newton was picked second. I don't quite understand why, but okay.

However, I most object to Jesus being listed as part of "Judaism" because traditional Judaism rejected and aided in the crucifixion of Jesus, so what gives?
 
2006-05-23 02:57:30 AM  
Krazikarl: Jesus almost certainly existed as a historical person

Oh really? Do you beleive that just because...or can you come up wth any historical proof?
/try googling "historical Jesus"
 
2006-05-23 02:57:53 AM  
Muhammad is number 1!!!!!

MUHAMMAD! MUHAMMAD! MUHAMMAD! WOOOOOOOOO!!!
 
2006-05-23 02:58:13 AM  
Hitler should be in the top ten, if only for his impact on internet discussions.
 
2006-05-23 02:58:58 AM  
Cleopatra anyone?
 
2006-05-23 02:59:20 AM  
What a dumb list, Augustus Cesar more influntial than Julius Cesar? You know the guy that was the reason Augustus came to power? Right, besides Gutenberg was easily the most influential in history, the printing press being the most important invention in history after all. Every great civilization before the printing press fell to ruin. During the time of Alexander the Great a working steam engine was close too invention, but the work was lost when the Great Library was burn't to the ground.
After the printing press, any civilization that had it never fell, and Europe saw one of the greatest surges in scientific discovery ever seen. Easily the best and most influential invention in history, and thus its inventor by the most influential by association.
 
2006-05-23 02:59:29 AM  
Why is Cortes behind Pizarro?
 
2006-05-23 03:00:09 AM  
I actually enjoyed the book. It was a pretty good bathroom read. I'm not sure what that says about me.

Anyway, as I recall, there were 2 main reasons for putting Muhammad above Jesus on the list. First, as previously mentioned, Muhammad was a successful political and military leader as well as a religious figure, while Jesus was a purely religious leader. Second, the author argued that most of the credit for Christianity's spread had to given to St. Paul, who ended up as #6 on the list. So, basically, Muhammed had a more direct impact on the world, while Jesus' inluence was primarily through his followers. Personally, I think it makes sense.
 
2006-05-23 03:01:42 AM  
How come Emperor Hirohito and Franklin Roosevelt aren't on this list. Both of these men on their own were many times more influential than JFK. What gives?
 
2006-05-23 03:03:47 AM  
I like the guy who's brave enough to write in that Moses probably never existed and as such, probably shouldn't even be on the list, much less #15 of 100. I agree since we all know no one can live for 900 freaking years! Especially in a got-damn desert. Hell, Moses could've just been a series of Jewish leaders from the time of the tablets being delivered through to the wandering in the desert for 40 years. An uninterrupted string of guys moving into a leadership role and changing their name to Moses whenever the old Moses kicked the bucket. The ancient jews liked a good story you know, (rich oral tradition and all that) so telling the other people you encountered that your leader was an 800+ year-old man had it's upside, in that they may be awed by this news.
 
2006-05-23 03:03:59 AM  
How is Gandhi not on this list? More importantly, how did Martin Luther King get more votes than Gandhi in the person of the century poll? I think even MLK would agree with me here.

/pissed off indian
//this explains another popularity contest that comes to mind
///bush sucks
////Slashie McSlasherton
 
2006-05-23 03:05:52 AM  
mr lawson

Any fool knows better than to stick anything related to religion into google and expect good answers. Any idiot can make a website, and since so many people are rabid about religion one way or another, you get so much crap.

Wikipedia has a pretty good article on the subject:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Historicity_of_Jesus#Jesus_as_historical_​figure

(Look up "Historicity of Jesus" if that doesnt post well. "History of Jesus" assumes that Jesus existed, so you dont want that.)

The gist of it is is that although some people do believe that Jesus didnt exist historically, the VAST majority of historians do believe that he existed as a person. Which is what I said originally. Its fine if you hold a minority viewpoint given the lack of indisputable evidence, but Occums Razor would seem to suggest that Jesus existed if nothing else.
 
2006-05-23 03:06:36 AM  
What about Linus Torvalds? His work inspired some of the most brutal holy wars imaginable.
 
2006-05-23 03:07:25 AM  
Krazikarl: Jesus almost certainly existed as a historical person

There really is little evidence for this belief. Some books of the bible were written centuries after the purported life of Jesus, as well as writings referencing Jesus existing more as a principle rather than a living being.
 
2006-05-23 03:07:43 AM  
Somehow I get the idea that this list is biased.

Why? Oh, no reason, just that its URL starts with "adherents.com"...

and forgot what religion promptly did to some of his listing.

6 St. Paul Judaism; Christianity proselytizer of Christianity
Whoah whoah whoah there. That's his entire claim to fame, and he gets #6, above all the scientists who changed the world? Bias shows already.

Repeat again under "Moses", #15. And for that matter, Constantine the Great, who he holds as much greater than Martin Luther.

12 Galileo Galilei Catholic astronomer; accurately described heliocentric solar system
And was promptly tried for heresy by the RELIGIOUS authorities. Don't forget that one. As a scientist, he was able to see past dogmatic belief and come up with a solution that was unthinkable to the deeply religious.

Simon Bolivar Catholic (nominal); Atheist National hero of Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Bolivia
Pope Urban II Catholic called for First Crusade
'Umar ibn al-Khattab Islam Second Caliph; expanded Muslim empire


And in that order. Uhhh...what?
And all above Julius Caesar, Stalin, Mao, and Peter the Great. Oh, do tell, please, do tell.
 
2006-05-23 03:09:21 AM  
david11982: Well, this is a lot better than the list of the 1000 great achievements of the Islamic world, which was supposed to show the positive impact the religion has had on the world, but mostly featured inventions from pre-Muhammad times or from non-Muslims living in predominantly Muslim countries,

here's some:

Al-Khwarizmi introduced Indian numerals, studied algebra and calculated distances and movements of stars. He correctly calculated the distance from the earth to the moon, and he suggested that if you divide the atom, you would release enough power to destroy a city the size of Baghdad (take THAT, Einstein)

Ibn Sina. Physician and philosopher. He wrote down the whole of medical knowledge in a "Canon of Medicene". He helped the view that matter is eternal and linked this idea with an absolute principle (God). Proponent of faith vs. reason.

Ibn Al-Haitam composed scientific treatrises on the eye. Pretty much everything we know about the eye today comes from him.

Al-Biruni drew up calendar calculations that were more accurate than the Gregorian calendar.

Al-razi. Physician, chemist and philosopher. Wrote treatises on various infectious diseases.

Al-Zarawi wrote a series of medical and pharmocological textbooks

Ibn Al-Baitar wrote a treatise which listed 1400 drugs (PIKHAL anyone?)

Al Idrisi wrote a geographical description of the then known world

Ibn Rushd developed a philosophical system called Averroism which later influenced European philosophy.


From about 700 to 1100, Islam was the wealthiest and most civilized nation on the planet. A society that cherished freedom, compassion, religious tolerance, and was at the forefront of technological and scientific achievement. While Europe was still struggling with the infantile task of literacy, the muslims raced forward with radical new concepts and ideas in mathematics, astronomy, philosophy, and nearly all areas of technological and civil progress. So many ideas and words that we commonly use today have their origins in Islam.

They developed complicated time pieces: clocks, precision balances, astrolabs, maps of the stars, telescopes, and each of the major cities even had an observatory. They were heavily into glassblowing and ceramics: they had retorts, distilling flasks, test-tubes and recepticles. Early on, they weren't very keen at sea travel, but quickly learned the art of shipbuilding. They built huge canals, waterwheels and locks.

Because of their dealings with Byzantium (they were on good relations with them), Byzantium retained their ties with the classical empires. So it was that Syrian Christians translated the works of Greek philosophers to Arabic. If this had not happened, there would have been no Renaissance, no Age of Reason, no Age of Enlightenment, and no Democracy in the west, because Europe had forgotten all that shiat. They weren't even aware that the classics existed.

Islam had whole schools completely devoted to one philosopher, such as Galen, Hippocrates, Ptolemy, Euclid, Archimedes, Plato and Aristotle. They had history courses about the study of Ancient Civilizations. From India and China they appropriated many sciences: philosophy, mathematics, physics, chemistry, biology, astronomy, history, and geography. They worked with silver nitrate, soda, caustic solutions, blue vitriol and other chemicals and hundreds of drugs. Words like 'drug', 'alum', 'amalgam', 'anilin' 'arrack' 'soda' 'talcum' come to us from the Arab world.

The muslims loved libraries. The library in Damascus had 400,000 volumes--and this is in the days before the printing press. They were also fanatical about cleanliness. Some of the baths they built are still in use today. Doctors were already teaching anatomy, preventive medicene, hygiene, surgery, the circulation of the blood, and even using music as a tool in psychiatric therapy

And unlike Catholicism, Islam was not the center of a complex society.
 
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