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(Some Guy)   Autistic teenager gets his chance to play on the high school basketball team and scores 20 points in three minutes   (kutv.com) divider line 203
    More: Spiffy  
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33146 clicks; posted to Main » on 23 Feb 2006 at 1:12 PM (9 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2006-02-23 01:51:49 PM  
RedfordRenegade: brilliantest

Like you?
 
2006-02-23 01:54:38 PM  
BusyHands: Go get a copy of "The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night" for a fantastic read

I'm still annoyed with myself for taking so long to read it after seeing it recommended so often on fark. I've never known anyone on the autistic spectrum, and so can't vouch for accuracy in the treatment. I can say that it was one of the most unique, enjoyable and thought provoking fiction I've read in quite some time.
 
2006-02-23 01:55:52 PM  
ShakaBauer: Worse- running up the score with a crippled.

Crippled?
 
2006-02-23 01:56:17 PM  
My son played on a rec league team with an autistic kid this past year. In rec league, you have a mandated minimum number of minutes you can play.

The autistic kid was a disaster. He wouldn't, or couldn't, play defense. The other teams essentially left him alone and double teamed our star player. The autistic kid shot something like 5% for the year (2 for 40). He'd regularly get torched for 10-20 points when he was in the game.

He had no business being in that league.
 
2006-02-23 01:56:19 PM  
ha ha!
"this story burns the clams of my heart"!!
ha ha ha!
 
2006-02-23 01:56:26 PM  
great story -- and I'm very familiar with autism, and know that this photo has nothing to do with the affliction, but damn if it still isn't some funny stuff:

img.photobucket.com

Wheelchair-Basketball Players Stunned By Thunderous Slam Dunk
courtesy of The Onion

/who's going to hell with me??
//I call shotgun!
 
2006-02-23 01:59:08 PM  
*blahpers*

I did. I was going to say, I'm artistic too, but nobody made a big deal out of me sinking a couple buckets.

/sour grapes
 
2006-02-23 01:59:16 PM  
Also, it's often more about sensory problems and social/emotional perceptions than intelligence.

Exactly. It's a whole myriad of symptoms that cover the spectrum as it were. One kid I know had some problems understanding jokes or knowing what was appropriate to say, and didn't do so well with changes in routine (schedule, how to solve a math problem, whatever). Another had little concept of personal space.

Some autistic kids have some savant traits as well. Many have perfect pitch. One of my students knew dates and days - you could ask him any date from an 80-year range and he could tell you the day it fell on. Also had a GREAT memory for detail and noticed EVERYTHING..."Ms. F, this is the first time you've worn a ponytail! Ms. F, this is the first time you've worn your glasses!" etc. It's pretty amazing.
 
2006-02-23 01:59:24 PM  
Holy crap I couldn't even hit the net.

OH I'm driving!
 
2006-02-23 01:59:36 PM  
RobDownSouth: My son played on a rec league team with an autistic kid this past year. In rec league, you have a mandated minimum number of minutes you can play.

The autistic kid was a disaster. He wouldn't, or couldn't, play defense. The other teams essentially left him alone and double teamed our star player. The autistic kid shot something like 5% for the year (2 for 40). He'd regularly get torched for 10-20 points when he was in the game.

He had no business being in that league.


It's a rec league, which are generally meant to be inclusive leagues for anyone to play in and have fun. There are non-autistic kids who could just as easily be in exactly his place and have the same failings and stats.
 
2006-02-23 01:59:50 PM  
Thanks, monobot2. I used to work with autistic kids in elementary school, but it's been a long time. I seem to remember that they weren't necessarily unintelligent - some of them just couldn't concentrate on anything even long enough to be considered ADD cases. I have heard that some autistic kids are just getting way too much sensory input all the time, and the constant overload is what gets in the way of their developing better social (or whatever) skills.
 
2006-02-23 02:02:29 PM  
Autistic people are very often extremely brilliant in some area, but they have really poor ability to interact with other people, which gives the impression that they're mentally handicapped.

I suck with interacting with people...I believe that makes me autistic...

/crap wait...I'm not "extremely brilliant", just a little gassy
 
2006-02-23 02:03:53 PM  
I don't care if they guarded him or not, that's some good shooting and I say bully for the coach and his teammates and for that matter good for the opposing team.
 
2006-02-23 02:04:00 PM  
rudy rudy rudy
 
2006-02-23 02:04:30 PM  
http://deseretnews.com/dn/view/0%2C1249%2C595103605%2C00.html

Kim Peek: The Real Rain Man

www.wisconsinmedicalsociety.org
 
2006-02-23 02:04:54 PM  
Obscure, but awesome. What a crappy idea for a show's finale...

Actually, I think it's the most brilliant. finale. ever.

Think about it. What does it say? It says that everything that had preceded was the product of this child's mind. That it was imagination. Which is all a TV show is. Nothing more or less.

/couldn't sink 6 in 20 tries, maybe 25.
 
2006-02-23 02:06:09 PM  
Proving once and for all, that those who play sports are the mental equivalents of retards.

Furthermore; those that watch sports are of even lesser mental capacity.

/turns off olympic curling to watch paint dry
//at least the special olympics is fun
///retards watching retards
 
2006-02-23 02:07:34 PM  
www.vegasexperts.com

And boy was that retard excited
 
2006-02-23 02:17:18 PM  
fatladysings

Also had a GREAT memory for detail and noticed EVERYTHING..."Ms. F, this is the first time you've worn a ponytail! Ms. F, this is the first time you've worn your glasses!" etc. It's pretty amazing.


Oh sure, AMAZING. I say things like that all the time: "Ms. F, you wouldn't have had to put your hair in a ponytail if you didn't hit snooze 3 times this morning! Ms. F, I noticed you went to the optomistrist after work yesterday to get your new glasses and didn't get home until 5:36pm!"

But when I do it, I'm a "stalker" and get slapped with a "restraining order". What a crock of shiat.
 
2006-02-23 02:21:55 PM  
My fiance's doing a thesis on changes in brain volume before and after puberty in autistic children. She had me read it over last night since I'm the bigger grammar nazi of the two of us.

/sets fire to the mussles of your heart?
 
2006-02-23 02:23:07 PM  
Parent of an Autistic-spectrum kid (Asperger's Syndrome) here. I agree that this is a nice story

I feel for the mother in how she felt that this was the first time her son had succeeded at anything. Aspy and high-function Autistics are often mentally acute and their innate ability to zero in on a topic enables them to often do great things in things like science and technology, but their lack of social awareness and inability to pick up non-verbal queues is cause for much grief and hand-wringing for their family because they don't make friends easily and they get labeled as "retards" by their age-peers. In my boy's case, the worst manifestations are in spatial awareness and motor skills, so we will never have a moment like Jason's mother since he will never be athletic. Knowing that he is one of the more compassionate children with his condition is a consolation, and he has a mind like a steel trap so he will likely grow to be a productive adult in the right situation. Sales is not in the picture, though.

It is important to know that EVERY case of Autistic-spectrum disorder is unique, but they all deserve to be treated with some respect. I have a sense of humor, so I am still able to snicker at the "retard" jokes, but I feel kind of guilty when I then picture my boy struggling to fit into an often cruel, unenlightened, labeling world.

BusyHands has a couple of posts up high in the thread referring to some great reading on the subject. "Thinking in Pictures" by Temple Grandin is one I thought was terrific, and it can be a real eye-opener to the alternative world that many of these people are forced to live in. If even one Farker or Farkette picks up a copy and learns a bit from it, then Fark is a worthwhile thing for more than Boobies and flame-wars.

Thanks for paying attention.
 
2006-02-23 02:24:09 PM  
Quick1

hey grammar nazi, it's "fiancee" if it's a woman
 
2006-02-23 02:26:50 PM  
" My son played on a rec league team "

What, he sucked so bad he couldn't get on a real team?
 
2006-02-23 02:28:10 PM  
Whoops, it was Mr. Clarence Butterworth that posted the "Thinking in Picures" link. Props top you too, Clarence, for attempting to educate.
 
2006-02-23 02:29:32 PM  
I played hoops at noon today and
the fellas were talking about this.
Thank you FARK.
 
2006-02-23 02:29:38 PM  
Mr. Clarence Butterworth: Thinking in Pictures

Thank you for posting this.
 
2006-02-23 02:30:16 PM  
Many of you don't seem to have a good grasp on autism.

/wife works with them.
 
2006-02-23 02:31:01 PM  
runninutes: I have heard that some autistic kids are just getting way too much sensory input all the time, and the constant overload is what gets in the way


Yeah. Now imagine trying to learn about Christopher Columbus or some junk while your senses are all overloading and out of whack.

Someone once said "Intelligence is defined as 'the ability to take intelligence tests"
 
2006-02-23 02:32:09 PM  
Awesome.

And not surprising. He needed the first couple of shots to figure out the currents in the air. From that point, it's all math, baby.

Seriously, awesome.
 
2006-02-23 02:32:22 PM  
High functioning autistics think differently than everyone else, even other high functioning autistics. However, they think everyone else thinks as they do, that's why the frustration due to the inability to pick up on non-verbal cues. High or even middle functioning autistics still make valuable contributions to society, usually because of their condition, not despite it.
 
2006-02-23 02:34:31 PM  
Sliceablekitty

Yeah, she's great, I got both her books, although there might be another one out now. I'd like to meet her and shake her hand. Maybe metaphorically because of the tactile contact thing.
 
2006-02-23 02:39:10 PM  
fatladysings: I don't know the science (more boys than girls), but it's becoming increasing more common.

The sex link is pretty interesting from a theoretical standpoint at least. The speculation that a lot of it boils down to an overexpression of certain traits of a normal human male's brain in particular is facinating.
 
2006-02-23 02:39:44 PM  
A lot of autistics have trouble because they cannot filter out or ignore small details that we ingore.

So crossing the street is a new experience each and every time.

That stop sign on your corner, is a new object. It isn't integrated and largely ignored.

Imagine walking into a Wal-Mart and having to try and concentrate on every single thing in store as its all whizzing by.

A great story.

And considering how common autism is among boys now with no idea why, and the number with it are exploding, many of you asshats will soon get to know a whole lot more about autism.
 
2006-02-23 02:41:22 PM  
THX1142: Try to keep the kid away from red food dyes as well.
 
2006-02-23 02:44:16 PM  
nuclear_asshat:"And considering how common autism is among boys now with no idea why..."

consider this...there is tons of mercury in the environment, there is mercury in the body of the mother of the child if she has fillings in her mouth, there was, up until recently, a mercury derivative in the vast array of unneccesary vaccines that kids get. and guess what mercury binds to very easily, more easily than almost anything else? testosterone. no joke.

lots of people disagree with this medical philosophy, but i am not one of them.
 
2006-02-23 02:46:24 PM  
Thanks for the tip, Quantum '.

Another family member has MS, so we are all reducing intake of processed foods and additives already as part of a holistic approach. It seems to make a difference for us.
 
2006-02-23 02:50:50 PM  
People who aren't aware that there's a difference between "Autistic" and "Retarded" annoy me almost as much as people who aren't aware that there's a difference between "Chinese" and "Japanese".

img208.imageshack.us
^^^Retarded.

img479.imageshack.us
^^^Autistic, and not particularly useful against an insurgency.
 
2006-02-23 02:54:29 PM  
Warms the cockles of my heart?

/I'm an asshole
 
2006-02-23 02:54:41 PM  
Props to you nuclear asshat. You're right.

Props to you Mr. Clarence Butterworth.

Props to you THX1142.

It's so prevalent and devestating when it hits you. I'm all for a joke, but the shock value of some of these comments is too much.

And if I ever see anyone wearing the tee shirt about autistic kids and rocking, you will all know about it, since it will be newsworthy and probably posted.

Of course, I'll be under arrest for assault, and the smarty in the tee shirt will have a jaw wired shut and teeth particles in his shiate for days.
 
2006-02-23 02:57:04 PM  
"However (and its a tiny however), I know that autism doesn't necessarily mean anything like mental retardation since alot of really brilliant people seem to be a little bit on the autistic side. Also I dont think it has any neurological side effects in terms of the kids motor skills."

AFAIK, most autistic people (even mild forms like Asperger's) do in fact have motor skills issues. Or perhaps it's not so much that the motor skills don't work, but that learning "automatic" advanced sequences of motor control the way most people do (learning to throw or catch a ball, for instance) is a bit harder for them, it only comes with a great deal more conscious effort than it does for "normal" people.
 
2006-02-23 03:00:29 PM  
Props to you, MonkeyButton. Spot-on. Nobody can understand the devastation that can be caused by even a mild form of such a cruel and mysterious disorder. I wish I could still count myself among those that are completely ignorant of such things, though I hope I wouldn't be on here making jokes if I were.

I'm all for having a sense of humor, even a twisted one at times, but I've had to remove myself from a few situations where the "'tard" jokes were getting passed around. It's just too painful when it's something that has hit your family, as it has mine.
 
2006-02-23 03:04:27 PM  
pudge44 - Amen.
 
2006-02-23 03:05:50 PM  
peepee mcpoop: consider this...there is tons of mercury in the environment, there is mercury in the body of the mother of the child if she has fillings in her mouth, there was, up until recently, a mercury derivative in the vast array of unneccesary vaccines that kids get. and guess what mercury binds to very easily, more easily than almost anything else? testosterone. no joke.

Interesting. I'll have to look into that.

Mr. Clarence Butterworth: High functioning autistics think differently than everyone else, even other high functioning autistics.

That has to be one of the most intelligent things I've read in this thread. As someone in the Asperger's Syndrome range, I can say that this is 100% true. I've always been exceptional when it comes to math, but I definitely don't process the numbers in the way everyone else does (drove my math teachers mad sometimes). However, I am close enough to "normal" that I've been able to explain, with a little time and effort, just how I do process the information to a few people and have them understand.
 
2006-02-23 03:06:34 PM  
bubbaprog: Maybe he can't play defense, and that's why he wasn't actually on the team. Then again, if he can hit three-pointers and doesn't play defense, maybe he can go play at Grinnell.

Damn right. Our basketball team is a hell of a lot of fun to watch. Or at least it was when I was there. It's been a few years...
 
2006-02-23 03:10:36 PM  
wow. He must've been playing against the Phoenix Suns.
 
Kaw
2006-02-23 03:11:54 PM  
I work for autism.
So I am really getting a kick out of most of these replies.

Some of you guys are very good at making it sound like you know what you are talking about.

But trust me.... You don't.

I think you just want to make yourself sound smart, when in reality you dont know what you are talking about.

This is how bad info gets passed around.

If you dont know about the topic....don't make yourself sound like you do.

Cause some Farkers believe everything they hear.
 
2006-02-23 03:13:50 PM  
Way too few Down's Syndrome photos in here for my liking.
 
2006-02-23 03:16:22 PM  
MonkeyButton

And if I ever see anyone wearing the tee shirt about autistic kids and rocking, you will all know about it, since it will be newsworthy and probably posted.

Of course, I'll be under arrest for assault, and the smarty in the tee shirt will have a jaw wired shut and teeth particles in his shiate for days.


Internet badass alert. Seriously though, my dad suffered a traumatic brain injury, totally changing his personality and ability to do almost everything. I don't beat someone's ass because they make a joke about their stupid buddy having "brain damage", though. It's a funny shirt, and like most things it will offend some people. Wearing one isn't the equivilant of someone raping your wife, though. Your family would probably benefit from you keeping your anger under control.
 
2006-02-23 03:16:30 PM  
MonkeyButton

And if I ever see anyone wearing the tee shirt about autistic kids and rocking, you will all know about it, since it will be newsworthy and probably posted.

Of course, I'll be under arrest for assault, and the smarty in the tee shirt will have a jaw wired shut and teeth particles in his shiate for days.


Where is the condemnation from all the moderate tard lovers?
 
2006-02-23 03:18:27 PM  
You only have freedom of speech as long as it doesn't make me cry. (tear welling up)
 
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