If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Chron)   NASA instructs space-station crew to discard 11-pound hunk of junk metal out into space. Later discover it was actually a German-made communications satellite   (chron.com) divider line 62
    More: Interesting  
•       •       •

35851 clicks; posted to Main » on 29 Mar 2005 at 10:20 AM (9 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



62 Comments   (+0 »)
   

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2005-03-29 10:23:20 AM  
Sputnik!
 
2005-03-29 10:23:21 AM  
"Yah Heinrich... yah, you are breaking up... yah, I cannot hear you... Heinrich... Heinrich? Ach, scheissenphonenz!"
 
2005-03-29 10:24:30 AM  
That headline was hella misleading.
 
2005-03-29 10:24:47 AM  
The most completely wrong headline...ever.
 
2005-03-29 10:24:58 AM  
The thing is actually called nanosputnik.

/bored already
//couldn't give a freaking fark
 
2005-03-29 10:25:00 AM  
It would be fun to aim it at my ex-wife's house.
 
2005-03-29 10:28:59 AM  
Thats pretty interesting, nonetheless. How many people get to launch a satellite with their own hands?

(Insert obligitory masturbation joke here)
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2005-03-29 10:29:20 AM  
In orbit throwing an object is like throwing a boomerang. One orbit later it comes back to you. If you throw it directly up or down relative to the Earth it comes back exactly. If you throw it along the direction of the orbit it misses slightly.
 
2005-03-29 10:31:25 AM  
Color me unimpressed. Hams have been using small satellites to communicate since the 1960s. In fact, there are currently 10 to 13 operational ham radio satellites, all of which are small and some of which can be 'guided' to greater or lesser degrees. Hams have been innovating the 'smaller and cheaper' approach to satellite communications for years.

Been there, done that, have the QSL cards to prove it.
 
2005-03-29 10:32:06 AM  
A little more information would have been nice. Did he have to give it the 'ol wind-up and pitch? Or did a gentle under-handed lob suffice? Was there any need to find an orbital niche?
 
2005-03-29 10:32:29 AM  
So the submitter is bad-mouthing German tech?

*boggle*
 
2005-03-29 10:37:40 AM  
It looks like Sputnik!!

 
2005-03-29 10:37:54 AM  
Worst....headline.....ever


They didn't discard it, they did exactly what they were supposed to do. It was meant to be launched by hand.
 
2005-03-29 10:38:00 AM  
Color me unimpressed. Hams have been using small satellites to communicate since the 1960s. In fact, there are currently 10 to 13 operational ham radio satellites, all of which are small and some of which can be 'guided' to greater or lesser degrees. Hams have been innovating the 'smaller and cheaper' approach to satellite communications for years.

Been there, done that, have the QSL cards to prove it.


What the hell does that have to do with this article?
 
2005-03-29 10:38:47 AM  
Should be put down in the Fark manual as an example of how not to write a headline.
 
2005-03-29 10:40:13 AM  
If you have DirecTV, this was on the NASA channel (376) last night on that Video File show they have. Based on NASA's budget for TV programming, it will probably be on again.

The thing just sort of went tumbling off into the distance, over the solar panels.
 
2005-03-29 10:41:08 AM  
Boo. Headline suxors. Funny is one thing, totally screwed up wrong is another. Boo.
 
2005-03-29 10:41:10 AM  
Zaz-

So you're telling me that if I'm in space, and I throw something directly at the Earth, it will come back to me? (at the earth would be down with respect to the earth, yes?)
 
2005-03-29 10:42:45 AM  
I really don't get it. A trillion "mission accomplished" and "hilarity ensues" headlines are fine, but every once in a while something like this sneaks through and people are up in arms over the "MISLEADING HEADLINE!"
 
2005-03-29 10:42:47 AM  
I thought the headline rather funny. It correlates with all the "Who cares?" comments in this thread.
 
2005-03-29 10:45:38 AM  
rritterson:

So you're telling me that if I'm in space, and I throw something directly at the Earth, it will come back to me? (at the earth would be down with respect to the earth, yes?)

Yes, because throwing something 'down' will increase its orbital velocity and give its orbit an elliptical trajectory (relative to yours). So if you were to throw a baseball directly 'downward', it would eventually come back up to meet you. More surprisingly, it would rise above you and reach a higher orbit, only to fall past you again to repeat the cycle.
 
2005-03-29 10:46:20 AM  
why is "One, Two, off you go" possibly the cutest way to launch a satellite?
because it was said in a thick russian accent, thats why!!
 
2005-03-29 10:46:53 AM  
I think.
 
2005-03-29 10:49:48 AM  
Die eier von Satan
 
2005-03-29 10:51:39 AM  
The 11-pound spacecraft, tossed into orbit by Sharipov

-- what a major tosser
 
2005-03-29 10:51:48 AM  
Sort of like a 12 pack of cheap beer out the window?
 
2005-03-29 10:53:22 AM  
The safety procedures were adopted following a Jan. 26 spacewalk by the two men in which Chiao floated too close to the station's steering thrusters.

NASA's kind of winging this, aren't they?
 
2005-03-29 10:57:25 AM  
PPL_Wannabe
Assuming you're in orbit to begin with, which was what I think confused ritterson (And myself, until I thought about it).

If you are simply floating 'still' relative to the earth, and 'throw' it towards earth , it'll just.. move towards earth.
 
2005-03-29 10:57:34 AM  
rritterson:

So you're telling me that if I'm in space, and I throw something directly at the Earth, it will come back to me? (at the earth would be down with respect to the earth, yes?)

PPL_Wannabe:

Yes, because throwing something 'down' will increase its orbital velocity and give its orbit an elliptical trajectory (relative to yours). So if you were to throw a baseball directly 'downward', it would eventually come back up to meet you. More surprisingly, it would rise above you and reach a higher orbit, only to fall past you again to repeat the cycle.

Actually throwing it forward (posigrade) will increase its velocity and thus altitude. Backwards (retrograde) will do the opposite. Throwing it towards the earth will realy just cause a change in the center of the satellite's orbit (rather than the center of the Earth being the center of the orbit, the center of the orbit will be offset - it will stay that way too).

Semi-related info: When spacecraft do reboosts (thruster burns in the retrograde direction to cause posigrade velocity and thus altitude increase) to gain altitutde they have to do two burns, 180 degrees apart from each other in the orbit. It's called circularizing the orbit.

@ PPL_Wannabe

More useless info for you: A "PPL" in Space Station speak is known as a Pre Packaged Load. It is basically a collection of data to be written to a certain memory location on the ISS computers. Probably has nothing to do with your name though huh? :P
 
2005-03-29 10:58:52 AM  
"They finished their work in 4 1/2 hours, an hour earlier than scheduled."
----------------------------------------------------------------
What finished something ahead of schedule? I am sure NASA will reprimand U.S. astronaut Leroy Chiao for this insubordination.
 
2005-03-29 10:59:56 AM  
You know, I'm amazed at all the physicists and astrophysicists we have here in the Fark forum!

For some odd reason, I originally assumed that you guys were nothing more than a bunch of unemployed high school drop-outs, wearing trap-door pajamas and living in your mothers' basements.

My bad!

(* pads off to the kitchen to fetch another bowl of cereal *)
 
2005-03-29 11:01:10 AM  
hufnmouth

The safety procedures were adopted following a Jan. 26 spacewalk by the two men in which Chiao floated too close to the station's steering thrusters.

NASA's kind of winging this, aren't they?


That was a Russian fark-up actually. Mission Control Houston had the video feed while Mission Control Moscow didn't. NASA told PKA (Russian Space Agency) that the crew was nearing the thrusters. Russian Flight Directors were adamant that it wasn't the case (though NASA could see it). Not a big deal anyway. The spacewalking crew just has to do a "bakeout" once they get back inside the airlock which allows any contamination from the thrusters to evaporate. More or less. For the sake of Fark that's plenty.
 
2005-03-29 11:02:32 AM  
drivinwest:

Actually throwing it forward (posigrade) will increase its velocity and thus altitude. Backwards (retrograde) will do the opposite. Throwing it towards the earth will realy just cause a change in the center of the satellite's orbit (rather than the center of the Earth being the center of the orbit, the center of the orbit will be offset - it will stay that way too).

Ah ok, thanks. I was close, anyway. :D
 
2005-03-29 11:05:14 AM  
drivinwest:

More useless info for you: A "PPL" in Space Station speak is known as a Pre Packaged Load. It is basically a collection of data to be written to a certain memory location on the ISS computers. Probably has nothing to do with your name though huh? :

No information is useless to me; I thrive on it. :)

'PPL' in my case stands for 'Private Pilot's License', which I'm currently working on - hence my complete screename. ;)
 
2005-03-29 11:07:01 AM  
AH! That PPL! Too many years of doing space geek stuff has removed normal, useful acronym definitions from my brain and replaced them with junk like "Pre Packaged Load" :/
 
2005-03-29 11:09:53 AM  
What jackass (or moran) writes headlines here nowadays?
 
2005-03-29 11:20:57 AM  
boohiss:
What the hell does that have to do with this article?

If you had read the article, it clearly states that the 'piece of junk' thrown was a small experimental communications satellite. I was commenting on the fact that this has been done before. In fact, the ISKRA series of ham radio satellites were tossed from Salyut-7 back in 1982, and RS-17 was tossed from Mir back in 1997.
RS-18 was thrown from Mir in 1998.

It's been done before.

Nothing new.
 
2005-03-29 11:23:19 AM  
the headline was a pre-packaged load of another sort. flag on the play
 
2005-03-29 11:24:25 AM  
The headline obviously sucks, if it read:

"NASA instructs space station crew to discard 11-pound hunk of junk metal out into space. Later discover it was actually a German-made communications satellite. Your dog wants to play fetch."

It would be much better.
 
2005-03-29 11:28:29 AM  
Fark Me To Tears
For some odd reason, I originally assumed that you guys were nothing more than a bunch of unemployed high school drop-outs, wearing trap-door pajamas and living in your mothers' basements.

Graduated HS in 1985
Own my own home
Two cars
Wife and son
Programmer/analyst

Stereotypes are dangerous. Monotypes are worse. I prefer triotypes myself...
 
2005-03-29 11:31:53 AM  
or how about: "Tiny satellite launched from the ISS by hand - the skeet launcher was busted."
or "Tiny satellite launched from the ISS by hand. NASA officials say Verne Troyer now on correct orbit path."

i know you guys can do better than that - let's help the submitter here
 
2005-03-29 11:44:51 AM  
Nice headline, Asshat.

What's next "Shuttle "accidently" blasts off...right on time."?
 
2005-03-29 11:49:58 AM  
Previous German effort in space:

 
2005-03-29 12:01:50 PM  
Great Headline!
 
2005-03-29 12:03:49 PM  
DarthBrooks: Previous German effort in space:

Well, technically, previous german effort in space:



and



Considering the people that worked on it.
 
2005-03-29 12:04:56 PM  
DarthBrooks
Previous German effort in space

Yes, the one the Yanks built their own upon.

As to the headline, I think the submitter was trying to be funny. Failed miserably but then who hasn't?

 
2005-03-29 12:06:09 PM  
The 11-pound spacecraft, tossed into orbit by Sharipov

 
2005-03-29 12:10:32 PM  
Wasn't it Johnny Carson who said "I'd like to thank the men responsible for the great strides in the American rocket program, but I don't speak German."?

I think it was in response to the moon landings.
 
2005-03-29 12:18:28 PM  
Misleading Fark headlines suck.
 
2005-03-29 12:19:02 PM  


Oh those wacky Germans.
(though Dr. Strangelove was fictional, he was loosely based on
Werner Von Braun, the father of the German rocket program and head of NASA's rocket team.)
 
Displayed 50 of 62 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all



This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter





In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report