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(Some Guy)   Oddtodd.com Creator... Sued by Dept of labor for collecting benefits while working (on his site)   (iht.com) divider line 27
    More: Ironic  
•       •       •

4619 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 Feb 2002 at 2:36 PM (12 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



27 Comments   (+0 »)
   

Archived thread
 
2002-02-27 02:41:08 PM
I want to

grab some

stuff
 
2002-02-27 02:46:57 PM
No excuses!
If you earn thousands off a website and sit on your ass all day with no intention of getting a job then you shouldn't get unemployment benefit.

Screw him.
 
2002-02-27 02:48:17 PM
I feel like i wanna

eat some

boobs
 
2002-02-27 02:49:41 PM
This page got farked, no text article at all.

Anyone have a text copy that can be posted here?
 
2002-02-27 02:50:56 PM
serves the guy right... and i dont see how this is ironic really, id say its pretty stupid.
 
2002-02-27 02:52:00 PM
If you earn thousands off a website and sit on your ass all day with no intention of getting a job then you shouldn't get unemployment benefit.
That IS income.
The Labor Department never comments on individual unemployment insurance cases, a spokeswoman said, but added that the unemployed are generally allowed to accept donations.
Hmmm. What constitutes a donation?
 
2002-02-27 03:01:29 PM
Perils of success in 'Laid Off Land'
Leslie Eaton The New York Times

NEW YORK Being unemployed has brought Todd Rosenberg fun, some fame and a very small fortune - which is why he is in trouble with the New York State Department of Labor.
.
Rosenberg, 32, is the creator of "Laid Off: A Day in the Life," an animated cartoon about a guy who spends all day watching TV in a blue bathrobe and eating potato chips.
.
More than a million people have visited www.oddtodd.com, Rosenberg's Web site, to watch the cartoon, play Elf Up, look at photos of kitties or connect to his Yahoo e-mail club, Laid Off Land.
.
There's the "Daily Fact I Learned From the TV," usually with a helpful link. (Recent example: "If you have a problem with ants like coming into your house to hang out you can sprinkle cinnamon or catnip where they're coming in. If you don't believe me you can buy some ants HERE and test it out.")
.
Displayed on the site is the cyberspace version of a tip jar. You can e-mail Rosenberg a dollar through the online payments service PayPal Inc. or Amazon.com Inc. He also has a post office box for nonvirtual donations. The suggested contribution: $1.
.
To his amazement, dollars have come streaming in. Real dollars. Virtual dollars. Nine thousand dollars. This sounds like a good thing. And until Valentine's Day, it was.
.
After all, Rosenberg had been unemployed since June, when the dot-com company where he worked as director of business development shut down its New York office.
.
At first, he said, he was not worried, though it did dawn on him that the $405 a week he was getting in unemployment insurance benefits would not cover the rent on his fifth-floor apartment, so he cashed in his retirement fund.
.
When he realized he might not find a job for a while, Rosenberg said, he felt he had to do something productive. He loved cartooning and had even started a greeting card business. So he taught himself how to program Flash animations for the Web.
.
Which brings us back to the Web site, the tip jar, and the Department of Labor, which called Rosenberg into its offices Feb. 14. His benefits had run out in December, and he did not take the meeting too seriously, he said, until he found himself in "an interrogation room, totally 'NYPD Blue.'"
.
While the investigator was very nice, Rosenberg said, he did make it plain that you are not supposed to earn money and collect unemployment at the same time. The Labor Department never comments on individual unemployment insurance cases, a spokeswoman said, but added that the unemployed are generally allowed to accept donations.
.
The other problem, however, is that unemployed people are supposed to be actively looking for work, not spending all of their time answering e-mail, drawing cartoons and getting interviewed on television about being unemployed. So there is a good chance, Rosenberg said, that he will be asked to repay the last seven weeks of his unemployment benefits - close to $3,000.
.
He doesn't have the money; the tip jar has been paying his rent. "I really am unemployed," he said. "I really am broke." NEW YORK Being unemployed has brought Todd Rosenberg fun, some fame and a very small fortune - which is why he is in trouble with the New York State Department of Labor.
.
Rosenberg, 32, is the creator of "Laid Off: A Day in the Life," an animated cartoon about a guy who spends all day watching TV in a blue bathrobe and eating potato chips.
.
More than a million people have visited www.oddtodd.com, Rosenberg's Web site, to watch the cartoon, play Elf Up, look at photos of kitties or connect to his Yahoo e-mail club, Laid Off Land.
.
There's the "Daily Fact I Learned From the TV," usually with a helpful link. (Recent example: "If you have a problem with ants like coming into your house to hang out you can sprinkle cinnamon or catnip where they're coming in. If you don't believe me you can buy some ants HERE and test it out.")
.
Displayed on the site is the cyberspace version of a tip jar. You can e-mail Rosenberg a dollar through the online payments service PayPal Inc. or Amazon.com Inc. He also has a post office box for nonvirtual donations. The suggested contribution: $1.
.
To his amazement, dollars have come streaming in. Real dollars. Virtual dollars. Nine thousand dollars. This sounds like a good thing. And until Valentine's Day, it was.
.
After all, Rosenberg had been unemployed since June, when the dot-com company where he worked as director of business development shut down its New York office.
.
At first, he said, he was not worried, though it did dawn on him that the $405 a week he was getting in unemployment insurance benefits would not cover the rent on his fifth-floor apartment, so he cashed in his retirement fund.
.
When he realized he might not find a job for a while, Rosenberg said, he felt he had to do something productive. He loved cartooning and had even started a greeting card business. So he taught himself how to program Flash animations for the Web.
.
Which brings us back to the Web site, the tip jar, and the Department of Labor, which called Rosenberg into its offices Feb. 14. His benefits had run out in December, and he did not take the meeting too seriously, he said, until he found himself in "an interrogation room, totally 'NYPD Blue.'"
.
While the investigator was very nice, Rosenberg said, he did make it plain that you are not supposed to earn money and collect unemployment at the same time. The Labor Department never comments on individual unemployment insurance cases, a spokeswoman said, but added that the unemployed are generally allowed to accept donations.
.
The other problem, however, is that unemployed people are supposed to be actively looking for work, not spending all of their time answering e-mail, drawing cartoons and getting interviewed on television about being unemployed. So there is a good chance, Rosenberg said, that he will be asked to repay the last seven weeks of his unemployment benefits - close to $3,000.
.
He doesn't have the money; the tip jar has been paying his rent. "I really am unemployed," he said. "I really am broke." NEW YORK Being unemployed has brought Todd Rosenberg fun, some fame and a very small fortune - which is why he is in trouble with the New York State Department of Labor.
.
Rosenberg, 32, is the creator of "Laid Off: A Day in the Life," an animated cartoon about a guy who spends all day watching TV in a blue bathrobe and eating potato chips.
.
More than a million people have visited www.oddtodd.com, Rosenberg's Web site, to watch the cartoon, play Elf Up, look at photos of kitties or connect to his Yahoo e-mail club, Laid Off Land.
.
There's the "Daily Fact I Learned From the TV," usually with a helpful link. (Recent example: "If you have a problem with ants like coming into your house to hang out you can sprinkle cinnamon or catnip where they're coming in. If you don't believe me you can buy some ants HERE and test it out.")
.
Displayed on the site is the cyberspace version of a tip jar. You can e-mail Rosenberg a dollar through the online payments service PayPal Inc. or Amazon.com Inc. He also has a post office box for nonvirtual donations. The suggested contribution: $1.
.
To his amazement, dollars have come streaming in. Real dollars. Virtual dollars. Nine thousand dollars. This sounds like a good thing. And until Valentine's Day, it was.
.
After all, Rosenberg had been unemployed since June, when the dot-com company where he worked as director of business development shut down its New York office.
.
At first, he said, he was not worried, though it did dawn on him that the $405 a week he was getting in unemployment insurance benefits would not cover the rent on his fifth-floor apartment, so he cashed in his retirement fund.
.
When he realized he might not find a job for a while, Rosenberg said, he felt he had to do something productive. He loved cartooning and had even started a greeting card business. So he taught himself how to program Flash animations for the Web.
.
Which brings us back to the Web site, the tip jar, and the Department of Labor, which called Rosenberg into its offices Feb. 14. His benefits had run out in December, and he did not take the meeting too seriously, he said, until he found himself in "an interrogation room, totally 'NYPD Blue.'"
.
While the investigator was very nice, Rosenberg said, he did make it plain that you are not supposed to earn money and collect unemployment at the same time. The Labor Department never comments on individual unemployment insurance cases, a spokeswoman said, but added that the unemployed are generally allowed to accept donations.
.
The other problem, however, is that unemployed people are supposed to be actively looking for work, not spending all of their time answering e-mail, drawing cartoons and getting interviewed on television about being unemployed. So there is a good chance, Rosenberg said, that he will be asked to repay the last seven weeks of his unemployment benefits - close to $3,000.
.
He doesn't have the money; the tip jar has been paying his rent. "I really am unemployed," he said. "I really am broke." NEW YORK Being unemployed has brought Todd Rosenberg fun, some fame and a very small fortune - which is why he is in trouble with the New York State Department of Labor.
.
Rosenberg, 32, is the creator of "Laid Off: A Day in the Life," an animated cartoon about a guy who spends all day watching TV in a blue bathrobe and eating potato chips.
.
More than a million people have visited www.oddtodd.com, Rosenberg's Web site, to watch the cartoon, play Elf Up, look at photos of kitties or connect to his Yahoo e-mail club, Laid Off Land.
.
There's the "Daily Fact I Learned From the TV," usually with a helpful link. (Recent example: "If you have a problem with ants like coming into your house to hang out you can sprinkle cinnamon or catnip where they're coming in. If you don't believe me you can buy some ants HERE and test it out.")
.
Displayed on the site is the cyberspace version of a tip jar. You can e-mail Rosenberg a dollar through the online payments service PayPal Inc. or Amazon.com Inc. He also has a post office box for nonvirtual donations. The suggested contribution: $1.
.
To his amazement, dollars have come streaming in. Real dollars. Virtual dollars. Nine thousand dollars. This sounds like a good thing. And until Valentine's Day, it was.
.
After all, Rosenberg had been unemployed since June, when the dot-com company where he worked as director of business development shut down its New York office.
.
At first, he said, he was not worried, though it did dawn on him that the $405 a week he was getting in unemployment insurance benefits would not cover the rent on his fifth-floor apartment, so he cashed in his retirement fund.
.
When he realized he might not find a job for a while, Rosenberg said, he felt he had to do something productive. He loved cartooning and had even started a greeting card business. So he taught himself how to program Flash animations for the Web.
.
Which brings us back to the Web site, the tip jar, and the Department of Labor, which called Rosenberg into its offices Feb. 14. His benefits had run out in December, and he did not take the meeting too seriously, he said, until he found himself in "an interrogation room, totally 'NYPD Blue.'"
.
While the investigator was very nice, Rosenberg said, he did make it plain that you are not supposed to earn money and collect unemployment at the same time. The Labor Department never comments on individual unemployment insurance cases, a spokeswoman said, but added that the unemployed are generally allowed to accept donations.
.
The other problem, however, is that unemployed people are supposed to be actively looking for work, not spending all of their time answering e-mail, drawing cartoons and getting interviewed on television about being unemployed. So there is a good chance, Rosenberg said, that he will be asked to repay the last seven weeks of his unemployment benefits - close to $3,000.
.
He doesn't have the money; the tip jar has been paying his rent. "I really am unemployed," he said. "I really am broke." NEW YORK Being unemployed has brought Todd Rosenberg fun, some fame and a very small fortune - which is why he is in trouble with the New York State Department of Labor.
.
Rosenberg, 32, is the creator of "Laid Off: A Day in the Life," an animated cartoon about a guy who spends all day watching TV in a blue bathrobe and eating potato chips.
.
More than a million people have visited www.oddtodd.com, Rosenberg's Web site, to watch the cartoon, play Elf Up, look at photos of kitties or connect to his Yahoo e-mail club, Laid Off Land.
.
There's the "Daily Fact I Learned From the TV," usually with a helpful link. (Recent example: "If you have a problem with ants like coming into your house to hang out you can sprinkle cinnamon or catnip where they're coming in. If you don't believe me you can buy some ants HERE and test it out.")
.
Displayed on the site is the cyberspace version of a tip jar. You can e-mail Rosenberg a dollar through the online payments service PayPal Inc. or Amazon.com Inc. He also has a post office box for nonvirtual donations. The suggested contribution: $1.
.
To his amazement, dollars have come streaming in. Real dollars. Virtual dollars. Nine thousand dollars. This sounds like a good thing. And until Valentine's Day, it was.
.
After all, Rosenberg had been unemployed since June, when the dot-com company where he worked as director of business development shut down its New York office.
.
At first, he said, he was not worried, though it did dawn on him that the $405 a week he was getting in unemployment insurance benefits would not cover the rent on his fifth-floor apartment, so he cashed in his retirement fund.
.
When he realized he might not find a job for a while, Rosenberg said, he felt he had to do something productive. He loved cartooning and had even started a greeting card business. So he taught himself how to program Flash animations for the Web.
.
Which brings us back to the Web site, the tip jar, and the Department of Labor, which called Rosenberg into its offices Feb. 14. His benefits had run out in December, and he did not take the meeting too seriously, he said, until he found himself in "an interrogation room, totally 'NYPD Blue.'"
.
While the investigator was very nice, Rosenberg said, he did make it plain that you are not supposed to earn money and collect unemployment at the same time. The Labor Department never comments on individual unemployment insurance cases, a spokeswoman said, but added that the unemployed are generally allowed to accept donations.
.
The other problem, however, is that unemployed people are supposed to be actively looking for work, not spending all of their time answering e-mail, drawing cartoons and getting interviewed on television about being unemployed. So there is a good chance, Rosenberg said, that he will be asked to repay the last seven weeks of his unemployment benefits - close to $3,000.
.
He doesn't have the money; the tip jar has been paying his rent. "I really am unemployed," he said. "I really am broke."
 
2002-02-27 03:12:25 PM
As Einstein would say... it's all relative
 
2002-02-27 03:13:09 PM
Lazy bastard. He shouldn't get paid any benefits. Shoot him, you damn Americans!
 
2002-02-27 03:14:52 PM
ha ha
 
2002-02-27 03:18:42 PM
F that guy. I was on unemployment for 3.5 months, from last september to this January. You've got to claim any income you earn. If that fool is making hundreds of dollars a week, then he has to report it so his check can be adjusted accordingly, or be cancelled. Double dumb ass on him for being a media slut and bringing the heat onto himself. He could have gotten away with it if he hadn't done interviews and craved attention. Looks like his virtual tip jar goes from 9k to 6k. Boo hoo.
 
2002-02-27 03:24:54 PM
It doesn't say he's being sued -- it just says the DOL might ask him to repay some of the benefits. Not the same thing.
 
2002-02-27 04:06:24 PM
when you have no job you realize how money is like, important, and stuff..
 
2002-02-27 04:17:58 PM
Nice. He's complaining about making $6,000 rather than $9,000 when he wasn't working. Spiffy.
 
2002-02-27 04:30:32 PM
This just goes to show how much the gov't loves to fark with you.
 
2002-02-27 04:50:42 PM
Vegeta: shows how much some bastards want to fark with the government at the expense of working tax payers!
 
2002-02-27 05:09:44 PM
BURN IN HELL CHEATER!
 
2002-02-27 06:03:45 PM
ummm so i'm unemployed and my mother gives me a grand to help keep bills paid and feed the baby and wife, thats employment? it is a DONATION not payment for services
 
2002-02-27 06:13:29 PM
If he is filling out his weekly paperwork and is actively looking for work then what is the problem ?
They are donations.
Once again, the government being jerkoffs.
 
2002-02-27 06:17:10 PM
This is what happens when you get featured on TV on a major network. He appeared on CNN Headline News about a month ago to talk about his site. You'd think he'd know the powers that be watch the news too.
 
2002-02-27 06:25:10 PM
I'd kick him a few bucks, but I'm unemployed too.
 
2002-02-27 06:34:44 PM
He needs to make a decision. Either the site is a hobby, and he will cover the costs himself (and/or claim any revenue it generates) while collecting assistance and looking for work. OR the site is his small business and he will stop collecting assistance and focus all his attention on developing the business to the point where it brings him enough income to live on. You can't just take the best of both worlds, chum.
 
2002-02-27 06:36:08 PM
Laid off here too. And I work every day earning "side money" How else are ya gonna get by? the key here is to earn non-tracable money

By the way, did all of you know that un-employment insurance is considered taxable income.
they never stop sticking it to ya.
 
2002-02-27 06:38:40 PM
Legally you should claim those donations in forms that you fill out, Spin359. I believe in the Jeffersonian form of welfare. It should keep you alive...barely. It should be uncomfortable enough that doing any kind of constructive work is preferrable.
 
2002-02-27 07:42:11 PM
I'm surprised that 9k a year can cover the upkeep of a web site which has attracted over a million visitors. If SA was featured on CNN we'd never hear the end of it!
 
FNG [TotalFark]
2002-02-28 12:58:22 AM
hmm... as I recall, the verbage on his web site indeed specified making a "donation" via paypal or amazon, and considering how funny his flash film is, it's either a dollar to acknowledge his creativity and situation, or spend that dollar to call terry bradshaw for a quick 20 minutes, and 7 cents a minute after that. a one dollar donation. that's donation, for you lawyers. and just because you are unemployed and looking for a job, that doesn't mean you cannot eat, sleep, call your mom, feed your cat, and spend time bettering the skills you have interest in, as long as you are working in good faith to find employment, and not lying to the bookkeepers. it's noteworthy that the Department of Labor has already spent much more in human resource hours and legal costs than would ever recoup the "possibility of recovering $3,000". I'm all for justice and the associated costs, but this is just silly in the extreme.
 
2002-02-28 01:43:25 AM
Stevarooni-"It should keep you alive...barely. It should be uncomfortable enough that doing any kind of constructive work is preferrable."

And what if all the work that is currently available is barely better or worse than unemployment or welfare?
 
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