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(Yahoo)   NASA scientists believe Genesis space capsule will be salvaged, unlike their reputations   (story.news.yahoo.com) divider line 60
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4755 clicks; posted to Main » on 10 Sep 2004 at 2:04 PM (10 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2004-09-10 02:06:51 PM  
great headline poster!
 
2004-09-10 02:06:55 PM  
We can rebuild it. We have the technology......
 
2004-09-10 02:06:56 PM  
why in the sam hill didnt they just give it a parachute?
 
2004-09-10 02:06:58 PM  
Like old warships go to salvage...
 
2004-09-10 02:07:15 PM  
lucky
 
2004-09-10 02:07:40 PM  
they did give it a parachute, it just didn't open
 
2004-09-10 02:08:37 PM  
This is cool. I hope they are able to get all of the stuff they need.
 
2004-09-10 02:09:03 PM  
Splat!
 
2004-09-10 02:10:24 PM  
"The scientists have been collecting tools for the job." 'tools' for the job = NASA scientists.

/Got nothing
 
2004-09-10 02:10:26 PM  
Maybe next time they spend several hundred million dollars on a project like this, they'll realize it's probably a good idea to invest some of that money in a method of landing that's actually *feasible*.
 
2004-09-10 02:10:39 PM  
Yeah, the genisis effect revived spock after all.

/Then you go back in time...to save farkin whales
 
2004-09-10 02:10:58 PM  
To edit:

"why in the sam hill didnt they just give it a working parachute?"

(If I could photoshop worth a damn, I'd do a closeup of the probe with an unopened 'chute that said either "ACME" or maybe "Windows 2000 Chute Deployment Software")
 
2004-09-10 02:12:36 PM  
Shouldn't we have been concerned when NASA invloved a stunt pilot? Surely there is a couple of skilled pilots at Ft. Rucker who have the skills? Obviously, that would not have helped the 'no fail' parachute.

That's like having Dr. Nick Rivera as a 'consultant' to the Mayo Clinic.
 
2004-09-10 02:13:39 PM  
How'd you like to have been the guys in the helicopter waiting to snag that thing yesterday:
"What the fark was that?!?
Was that it?!?"
 
2004-09-10 02:14:27 PM  
Just in case this turns into an Andromeda Strain incident, I started drinking Sterno martinis today. Wicked buzz...

Hey, who turned off the lights?
 
2004-09-10 02:17:15 PM  
Now if we can just send some oxygen to the space station.
 
2004-09-10 02:17:28 PM  
Mmmmmm.... wafers.
 
2004-09-10 02:18:13 PM  
Unfortunately, NASA used proto-matter in the construction of Genesis, so they had better hurry before it becomes unstable.
 
2004-09-10 02:18:39 PM  
Honestly, this turned out a lot better than I thought it would.

I had envisioned this thing slamming into a helicopter, killing the pilot and then screaming to earth in a massive, deadly fireball.

It had all the makings of a tragedy playing out on live national TV.

/maybe next time
 
2004-09-10 02:20:58 PM  
When asked, Phil Collins said: "I am not responsible for the break-up."
 
2004-09-10 02:22:58 PM  
Hollywood stunt pilots.
 
2004-09-10 02:25:19 PM  
Ya gotta take this into account:

Getting the damned thing in Solar orbit=amazing
Having the thing *work* while it was there=amazing
Bringing it back and having it make it here=amazing
A few explosive mortar bolts not working=amazing

What these guys[and gals] actually *do* for a living is waaay cooler than what most Farkers do. It's easy to crack on them, I do it also. But keep in mind how farking cool it really is, and how NASA has really come through lots of other times.
Space exploration is dangerous. Lots more folks and probes will be lost over time. But we need to do it. How else are we ever going to get away from the Amish?
 
2004-09-10 02:25:20 PM  
feh. we've done mid-air recovery for years. some payloads are just fragile. This payload was also moisture sensitive, so no water landings. I don't fault them for going this route, I just think NASA lacks the expertise to cover all the details like they used to. All the good people at NASA got "attritioned" away through cost cuts.

tax cuts and Iraq wars have to get paid for.
 
2004-09-10 02:28:19 PM  
That's what they get for not using metric.
 
2004-09-10 02:31:14 PM  
There's nothing bizarre about the mid-air snag, or having "Hollywood stunt pilots" who just happen to be rather skilled in this sort of flying do it.

The damned parachute just didn't open. Hard to believe something that spent a few years in alternatingly ridiculously hot and ridiculously cold temperatures might have a failure of one of countless systems aboard as it plummeted through the atmosphere.

But hey, let's not let that stop a bunch of armchair rocket scientists.
 
2004-09-10 02:32:08 PM  
Did they convert from the metric to english system?
 
2004-09-10 02:33:16 PM  
I read the previous article on this but still laugh out loud when I read the part about using Hollywood stunt pilots in helicopters to try and land the craft.

And also : "Some 350 palm-sized wafers made up five disks that were open to the solar wind during the mission, collecting atoms from the sun."

Were those chocolate or vanilla waffers??
 
2004-09-10 02:35:12 PM  
NASA does amazing, incredibly complex things that have never been done before, and what would be amazing would be if there weren't problems every once and a while. To put it in farker terms, bringing back molecules of the solar wind to earth is much harder and more complicated than taking the bus to Safeway to bring back beer.
 
2004-09-10 02:38:31 PM  
I agree that it is pretty amazing how they do some of this stuff. And I honestly belive that if space travel was as popular now as it was in the 60's we'd probably be a lot farther along and be able to do even more incredible things.

Taco Bell on the Moon!
 
2004-09-10 02:38:47 PM  
"No, you don't get any Bleedin' wafers with it!"
"Albatross"
 
2004-09-10 02:39:13 PM  
Great Andy Ihnatko quote today:
We're currently spending about $125,000,000 a day in Iraq, so it actually takes us a whopping two days to spend as much money there as was spent (over several years) on Genesis. Say we're spending the Iraq money well or say we're spending it poorly. That's not my point. But before we keep trumpeting about NASA squandering taxpayer money, I urge a sense of proportion.


Me too.

/aol
 
2004-09-10 02:43:33 PM  
"We should be able to meet many, if not all, of our science goals,"

Translation:

"Thank you dear lord for saving our asses!"
 
2004-09-10 02:44:14 PM  
Why is it that they needed to catch it in mid-air because of how precious the cargo was... and then it seems like it will be somewhat ok after smashing into the ground at 300km/hr?
 
2004-09-10 02:44:38 PM  
-save those big fat funky whales...
(dant-dant-dant)
Shoot the seals.
 
2004-09-10 02:49:55 PM  
What does the reputation of the scientist have to do with the reliability of a spacecraft he or she uses. If the 747 you're on crashes, does that hurt your reputation?

Scientists use data collected by probes.
Engineers design probes.
Technicians build probes.
 
2004-09-10 02:53:24 PM  


/had to be done
 
2004-09-10 02:54:14 PM  


/the buzzard has landed
 
2004-09-10 02:56:08 PM  
ephemeron

Maybe next time they spend several hundred million dollars on a project like this, they'll realize it's probably a good idea to invest some of that money in a method of landing that's actually *feasible*.

The air force used to retrieve film from spy satellites in much the same way during the '60s, only they used C-119s instead of helicopters. To prove that capturing the film this way wouldn't damage it, they tested the procedure by hooking people!

http://www.space.com/news/spacehistory/nro_at_forty_000926.html

The Air Force had their own shares of major screw ups, including the film landing in communist controlled soil. In fact, this happened so often that they put mice in the satellites instead of film every once and a while hoping to lead the communist to believe that they weren't spying on them, but merely instead blasting mice into space.

Of course whenever the Pentagon farks something up, wasting hundreds of millions of dollars, they just classify it so that the tax payers never find out.
 
2004-09-10 02:59:46 PM  
The whole reason they did the stunt pilot mid-air snatch to clean room was because even a soft landing was supposed to have put the whole thing at risk. Now, they are saying there is salvageable science even after hit the ground at 150+ mph and asploded?

Somebody is full of brown stuff. It was either massively over-engineered to begin with or they are lying.
 
2004-09-10 03:07:04 PM  
hvytrnsprt

Somebody is full of brown stuff. It was either massively over-engineered to begin with or they are lying.


We don't know the details yet, but what I think they are saying is that if it had worked properly we might have gotten 100% of the data. Despite the crash, we may still get some lesser percentage. That's not over-engineering or lying, but the kind of redundancy NASA tries to use in case something goes wrong, so that one problem doesn't lead to complete failure of the mission.
 
2004-09-10 03:08:15 PM  
NASA was quoted the day after the crash as saying that up to the point that the parachute didn't open, the mission was a tremendous success.

Well, yeah.
 
2004-09-10 03:08:15 PM  
mancheese wins.
 
2004-09-10 03:26:11 PM  
But [Stardust] was built to be more rugged and will land on its own with a parachute,

The parachute engineers are blowing brown stuff in their jeans right now.
 
2004-09-10 03:28:40 PM  
What these guys[and gals] actually *do* for a living is waaay cooler than what most Farkers do.

I save boobies. What do you do?

But keep in mind how farking cool it really is, and how NASA has really come through lots of other times.

NASA's greatest achievement was making space exploration boring.

Lots more folks and probes will be lost over time. But we need to do it.

Ayup.
 
2004-09-10 03:29:19 PM  
I believe that all of this sort of "adventure" should be encouraged. The money spent is all still right here on earth. The cost of this kind of exploration represents just a tiny bit of our expenditure as a people and yet, to me, represents just about the best that we can do with our wealth. No matter how much money we put into social programs there will always be poor and homeless. That is a hole that will never be filled because it has more to do with the nature of people than the money they earn. The exploration of the unknown, the decision to create a thing out of nothing and to risk it all for a chance to learn more about some aspect of what we are, just makes me feel good about my taxes paid.

I believe that every single blade of grass is no less than journeywork of the stars. (can't remember who said that but it strikes home in this context. Probably Whitman..it sounds like him.)
 
2004-09-10 03:35:05 PM  
Some 350 palm-sized wafers made up five disks that were open to the solar wind during the mission, collecting atoms from the sun. Scientists had feared the wafers shattered like glass in the crash, and many of them did.



"Finally, monsieur, a wah-fur thin mint"
 
2004-09-10 03:46:54 PM  
Scientists hopeful of salvaging Genesis

I was under the impression Genesis was beyond salvage. I mean, We Can't Dance? Phil's solo career?

I mean, if they could get Gabriel back in, maybe, but...
 
2004-09-10 03:48:03 PM  
I made a WMV file of the Genesis "touchdown" complete with Wagner's "Flight of the Valkyries" playing in the background.

I'd share it but I need someplace to host it. DOH!
 
2004-09-10 03:52:17 PM  
safeinsane
I made a WMV file of the Genesis "touchdown" complete with Wagner's "Flight of the Valkyries" playing in the background.

Wow. That's really witty. You could be a writer on "The Tonight Show" with those skills.
 
2004-09-10 03:56:30 PM  
This is excellent news - at least some good data can be salvaged from the mission. They may well develop some new forensic techniques to retrieve the rest (which could come in handy the next time an airliner crashes).

Now I suppose we'll get some attention-seeking senator making a statement that NASA shouldn't spend money on parachutes, since Genesis showed them to be unnecessary.
 
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