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(New Scientist)   Amazing Martian dune pictures. All that's missing is the sandworms   (newscientist.com) divider line 63
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36618 clicks; posted to Main » on 25 Aug 2004 at 12:55 AM (10 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2004-08-24 10:50:17 PM  
Fark newscientist.com. Their farking site is an adware trap. Someone please ban the freakin submitter...
 
2004-08-24 10:58:38 PM  
maybe you should clean your pc.
 
2004-08-24 11:07:22 PM  
Paul: What do you call the mouse sign on the second moon?
Stilgar: We call that one, Muad'Dib
Paul: Could I be known as Paul Muad'Dib?
Stilgar: You are Paul Muad'Dib.

Paul: My name is a killing word.


Excellent.
 
2004-08-24 11:08:36 PM  
I'm rather fond of the new pics from Opportunity, the NASA rover that's *in* such a crater. For example, these.

I'm also fond of FireFox, which has completely eliminated adware and popups for me.
 
2004-08-24 11:17:53 PM  
Wind is likely to have carved the 12-kilometre-long tear shape a million or more years ago when the Martian atmosphere was thicker, says Gerhard Neukum, principal investigator of the High Resolution Stereo Camera on Europe's Mars orbiter.

I'm not a Mars expert, but I don't quite understand that statement.

It's clear from the martian landers (Vikings, Pathfinder, MERs) that dust moves around. [Heck, that's obvious from the planetary dust storms visible from Earth.] MGS has shown clear evidence of "dust devils" which can scour the dust away and leave tracks visible from orbit. And some of the earliest pics from the MERs' microscopic imager have shown that the wind is strong enough to move sand grains around.

My wild-assed-guess would be that those dunes consist of larger grains which have accumulated in the crater (ie, too big to blow out), whereas the standard martian dust is small enough to be far more mobile. And that the dunes are probably still changing today, although very very slowly.
 
2004-08-25 12:57:48 AM  
I must not fear. Fear is the mind-killer...
 
2004-08-25 12:58:53 AM  
good timing, i just watched dune today for the first time (the 1984 version that is)
 
2004-08-25 01:01:47 AM  
Sean Young's career was eaten by a sand worm.
 
2004-08-25 01:04:00 AM  
Sandworms, HA! Not nearly as vicious as Graboids.
 
2004-08-25 01:05:14 AM  
I would die or die to know what Mars looks like at night.
 
2004-08-25 01:05:51 AM  
Yes, I know it would be dark.
 
2004-08-25 01:06:47 AM  
Same article, different site

Also has much higher res pictures.
 
2004-08-25 01:09:12 AM  
The spice must flow
 
2004-08-25 01:09:17 AM  
No pictures of Marvin?
 
2004-08-25 01:11:46 AM  
Spice flows better when you give the worms Metamucil.
 
2004-08-25 01:12:00 AM  
nice pics!

RelaximusPrime
here!

/get yourself a real browser
 
2004-08-25 01:13:14 AM  
Radioberlin... for you!

 
2004-08-25 01:17:53 AM  
Mars is the same color as my toilet bowl. Why is that?
 
2004-08-25 01:17:57 AM  

Am I the only one who would love to see a live photo from Mars where it's just an alien standing there giving us the finger?



Marvin the Martian
vs. Danny Divito

 
2004-08-25 01:18:03 AM  
Thanks, BearToy, you are now my hero. I want to glue my head to your back so I can go where you go and see how a living legend lives life.
 
2004-08-25 01:18:40 AM  
Beware of Shai Hulud
 
2004-08-25 01:19:03 AM  
Hey, what do you know? Mars is dark at night!

/always wondered
 
2004-08-25 01:21:11 AM  
radioberlin: I would die or die to know what Mars looks like at night.

Probably not very interesting. You've have a great view of the stars, because the atmosphere is so thin. I did wonder about the moons, though, and found this online:


Phobos, the larger of the two Martian moons, is a mere 14 miles (23 kilometers) across its largest dimension. Due to its proximity, though, from Mars it looks about one-third as big as Earths Moon looks from home. Even if you stepped casually out of your Martian hut, you could find the moons with your naked eye. But both are much darker than the Earths Moon, due to their darker surface materials, which reflect less light.

On Earth, a full Moon is so bright in the sky that it significantly lowers the number of celestial objects that can be observed. The Martian moons do not affect the night sky nearly as much.

Phobos merits special attention. It orbits Mars about once every seven hours, much faster than Mars' rotation. Phobos rises and sets in about 4 hours. It would rise again about 7 hours later.
 
2004-08-25 01:23:16 AM  
It is still a picture? From the article: " Perspective views such as teardrop take hours to process by hand" Hmmm, what does that sound like?
 
2004-08-25 01:24:55 AM  
My link to Firefox does not open in a new window

for practice I will try to make one that does
Firefox
 
2004-08-25 01:24:56 AM  
Fnord--It's late, but maybe I can explain the idea further.

If that stuff is basalt like they think it is, it would have welled up, filled up, and then 'cooled' in whichever general shape it might have, making it solid. Then windblown sand (eolian processes) would have had the chance over a really really long time (I'm so scientific at midnight) to wear down that basalt into that shape/look. Basically, the thing was sandblasted. I can only assume by 'thicker atmosphere', they meant the wind carried a lot more sand particles back then.

Now if it the teardrop is loose gravel (Or was, at one point, loose gravel), then yes your theory would make perfect sense. Most dunes, once buried under more dunes, will cement into whatever configuration they were buried. And yes, all active dunes (No vegetation) are in constant change.

/Geology major
//do I get a gold star?
 
2004-08-25 01:27:30 AM  
----------
Hey, what do you know? Mars is dark at night!
----------
Don't get me started. The last time I dropped acid I was VERY concerned that the light in the fridge stayed on all the time, even when the door was closed. I spent 45 minutes trying to open it real quick to get a glimpse of the dark. I decided that when I opened the door I let the dark out and that's where it went. Then my friend Shane grabbed a fresh pineapple that was part of the pool party theme and pointed it at me. I laughed until I peed. He used it like a gun for the rest of the night. I would think I'd be completely over it and he'd whup out his pineapple and I would laugh until I couldn't breathe. To this day I consider pineapples completely rediculous and smirk a bit when I see one at the store.

/unexplainable.
//oh crap... off-topic police. Um Mars Mars Mars Mars.
 
2004-08-25 01:33:41 AM  
grammar surrenders
 
2004-08-25 01:37:22 AM  
Katana_Angel: ...wear down that basalt into that shape/look...

Hmm, my impression from the article is that those are sand dunes, not solid sculpted rock.

I have since noticed that the artice says those dunes are 12 km long. I was thinking they were a smaller scale for some reason... 12 km means those are *big* dunes, so I suppose it's possible that even if they're being altered slightly today, the main body took a thicker atmosphere to form.
 
2004-08-25 01:38:14 AM  
Katana_Angel

Considering that they call it "basaltic sand" and "volcanic ash" several times, I doubt that's correct, but I can't really see why it would be unchanged after that much time...

/also in geology, honors
 
2004-08-25 01:46:47 AM  
1. Drink Water of Life 2. Become Meshack Shadderak 3.? 4. Profit
 
2004-08-25 01:46:47 AM  
That first picture, because of the angle, does look like some part of a sandworm.

/insert obscure Dune reference here
 
2004-08-25 01:49:53 AM  
"This blackish, bluish material was not so much known before," Neukum told New Scientist.
"it's martian blood," Duke added. "We're working on another game and there's just so much martian blood, you can sortof see it from space."
 
2004-08-25 01:59:22 AM  
That means the crater has killed somebody, doesn't it?
 
2004-08-25 02:00:24 AM  
Those pics don't look real. Those JPL guys have some mad Photoshop skillz/
 
F42
2004-08-25 02:01:26 AM  
I was hopng for a photoshopped picture of a sand worm on mars...I'm kinda disapointed.
 
2004-08-25 02:17:59 AM  
 
2004-08-25 02:28:35 AM  
 
2004-08-25 02:34:52 AM  
Mappy4prez wrote:
1. Drink Water of Life 2. Become Meshack Shadderak 3.? 4. Profit
Excellent, however i believe you are looking for Kwisatz Haderach. Excellent nonetheless. By the way Battle of Corrin was great. I enjoyed finding out what was the driving force tahtd divided house atriedes and harkonnen. I will now proceed to enjoy my non-life.
 
2004-08-25 02:43:28 AM  
Mappy4prez


I hope to Shai Hulud that the Kwisatz Haderach doesn't execute you for screwing up his name!

 
2004-08-25 02:44:52 AM  
nathkenn

Nice. But seeing as per the article the crater is ~2km deep (~1 mile) that must be the Worm-Mother(insert copyright thingy here).

I am currently willing to sell my (brand-new) copyright of said Worm-Mother(insert copyright thingy here) to you for the paltry sum of 1 (one) G-Mail invite.

My lawyers from San Francisco, the firm of Sum Ting and Wong esq shall be contacting you shortly.

If there are any Farkers (with a g-mail invite) that wish to save Mr. nathkenn from the legal hassle That Sum Ting and Wong will cause him, please e-mail me.

Good day sir
 
2004-08-25 02:50:52 AM  
Muadib's name is a killing word...
 
2004-08-25 03:01:53 AM  
ya know, after meeting some Ay-Rabs, Frank Herbert seems a tad derivative.

nonetheless, those who misspell Muad D'ib [probly me]

can choke on a portygul

/Chakobsa is French
 
2004-08-25 03:13:40 AM  
just for the record, Kwitzat Haderekh is Hebrew for shortening the path, which is how Herbert translates it in one of the books, although its a verb-pronoun phrase, not a proper noun. An awful lot of Herbert's words are Hebrew.
 
2004-08-25 03:50:41 AM  
As cool as the picture was.... heehee, the guy's name was Gerhard Neukum. Ancestor of Duke?
 
2004-08-25 03:53:35 AM  
grend123

just for the record, Kwitzat Haderekh is Hebrew for shortening the path, which is how Herbert translates it in one of the books, although its a verb-pronoun phrase, not a proper noun. An awful lot of Herbert's words are Hebrew.


Funny... he doesn't LOOK Druish.

/rimshot
 
2004-08-25 04:28:24 AM  
I am intrigued with the article, but am disturbed by how corporate and uncreative everything has become...WTF....Mars Express? Can I get paid to name shiat?!
 
2004-08-25 04:44:26 AM  
Paul Atriedes unavailable for comment.

/get yer nothin' right here, folks, while supplies last!
 
2004-08-25 04:55:14 AM  
 
2004-08-25 05:42:21 AM  
0.02$ hebrew lesson:

short-cut in hebrew = Kytzur Derech

/enjoy
 
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