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(Florida's Attorney General)   Ah, disaster brings out the best of people: First of many hotels to be charged with price gouging in the aftermath of Hurricane Charley   (myfloridalegal.com) divider line 125
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8482 clicks; posted to Main » on 21 Aug 2004 at 1:28 PM (9 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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F42
2004-08-21 02:29:04 PM
LineNoise
Time for a reality check folks, having more money than the next guy entitles you to a few extra perks. Generally speaking, the reason you have more money than him is that you have a skill which has a greater benefit to society, or you planned your life better.


Holy shiat you're an evil self-rightjeous bastard.

First of all, they overcharged the 77yr old with her disabled husband and daughter, illegally. They charged more than they advertised, that is not legal or ethical under any circumstances.

Secondly, having more money does not entitle you to anything, it means you can afford more.

And generally speaking, the reson you have more money is that you were lucky enough to be born in a better situation than those that don't. Your elitist "the poor deserve to be poor" attitude is awfull, and if you believe in any religious notions, is sure to land you in hell, asshole.

You know, if you ever get mugged, please, don't complain to the police. The mugger deserved to get your money, being better armed than you entitles him to take your possessions. Might (physical or economic) makes right, after all.
 
2004-08-21 02:29:41 PM
Supply and demand of the state.


 
2004-08-21 02:31:21 PM
This law was special because it applied to the essentials: food and shelter. Sure the hotel can charge whatever it wants, but not in this state of emergency. The government has the right to regulate business in order to contribute to the greater good of the society. All those people arguing Adam Smith and free market capitalism... well I don't see you guys protecting Ken Lay or monopolies like AT&T..
 
2004-08-21 02:36:09 PM
The next day, the family was charged $160.49 for one night's stay. Later that day they found a booklet at a rest stop advertising rates at the Payless hotel of only $29.99 per night, with a $10-per-person charge for additional guests. Two days after the family's stay, the hotel quoted a ground-floor room rate of $59.99 over the phone.


Bad example. Those "low" rates are loaded with restrictions. They are NOT going to give that $29.00 rate during prime tourist season or during special events / holidays. Plus, you usually have to book in advance to get these rates. You USUALLY can't just roll up to the hotel and ask for the $29 rate. Things such as "only good Monday, Tuesdays, and Weds" or "not valid April thru October" or they'll only designate a few rooms for special, so these rooms are gone then they charge the normal price.

If you even want to see this concept in action, try to book an online special for Las Vegas ($50 rooms at the Venetian my ass). Look at the rate calendar and you will get an instant education on hotel pricing policies.
 
2004-08-21 02:37:49 PM
exatamundo PSYCHONANT I own a bussness and if i did that the state would shut me down tomorow.
/goes back to work......
 
2004-08-21 02:39:05 PM
ArkAngel
 
2004-08-21 02:39:54 PM
I'd have to see the bill, but I'm thinking there is a bit more to this story. Either they hit the in room liquor cabinet a little hard or they actually drank that tricky bottle of Evian that was left in the room. Besides, hurricane season is considered a special event. And that usually carries a higher rate,. Perhaps they required extra towels. Or they forgot they ordered room service. Or the dad watched a bunch of pay-per-view movies and porn after the ladies had gone to sleep...
 
2004-08-21 02:40:36 PM
All this bs, presumably by people who may not have even read the article, and no one's even commented on the sad humor of the place being called "Payless". Heh.
 
2004-08-21 02:40:59 PM
Economist Walter E. Williams has a nice article about this topic:

http://www.gmu.edu/departments/economics/wew/articles/04/gouging.html

The Virginia Senate just passed the "Virginia Post-Disaster Anti-Price Gouging Act of 2004" that now awaits Governor Mark Warner's signature. In part the Act says, "During any time of disaster, it shall be unlawful for any supplier to sell, lease, or license, or to offer to sell, lease, or license, any necessary goods and services at an unconscionable price within the area for which the state of emergency is declared. Actual sales at the increased price shall not be required for the increase to be considered unconscionable."

Background for the law was last year's devastating impact of Isabel, a category five hurricane, that caused widespread property damage and destruction in parts of Virginia that included losses associated with power outages, flooding, and wind damage. In Virginia alone Isabel's death toll was about 36 with many more injured. The hurricane's effects were felt for months, and in many cases still linger.

Whenever a major disaster strikes, the public is confronted with all sorts of unpleasantries. The source of the unpleasantries is a sudden change in scarcity conditions: the immediate demand for many goods and services exceed their immediate supply. What to do? The typical response is for prices to rise dramatically. While buyers are not thrilled by rising prices, rising prices are one of the ameliorative responses to changes in scarcity conditions. They get people to voluntarily do what's in the social interest. Let's look at it using a couple of goods and services important to disaster recovery and ask a question or two.

In Isabel's wake private contractors from nearby states brought their heavy equipment to Virginia to clear fallen trees from people's houses. Producers and shippers of generators, plywood and other vital supplies worked overtime to increase the flow of these goods to Virginians. What was it that got these people and millions of others to help their fellow man in time of need? Was it admonitions from George Bush? Was it conscience or love for one's fellow man?

I'll tell you what it was. It was rising prices and the opportunity for people to cash in on windfall profits. Windfall profits are one of the vital signals of the marketplace. It's a signal saying that there are unmet human wants, leading people to strive to meet those wants. It stimulates the supply response to a disaster.

Imagine for a moment that prices aren't allowed to rise. Would it be reasonable for anyone to expect workmen to give up their nights and weekends and drive hundreds of miles to Virginia to remove trees from people's houses? Yes, there would be some motivated by charitable instincts but I'd hate to count on charitable instincts as the major source of help. If as the Virginia Senate has decreed prices are not allowed to rise in the wake of a disaster, lest they risk being deemed unconscionable, pray tell me what will produce the incentive for people to travel long distances, work overtime and make other personal sacrifices to provide goods and services to Virginians?

The Virginia Senate has provided a defense for sellers against charges of selling goods at an "unconscionable" price saying, "Proof that the supplier incurred such additional costs during the time of disaster shall be prima facie evidence that the price increase was not unconscionable." That vision reflects gross economic ignorance on the part of the Senate. Costs alone do not determine price; demand plays a role as well. When there's a disaster, demand is likely to be the major element driving prices up.

Here's my recommendation to the Governor and Virginia legislature if they're really interested in doing something about price-gouging. Their energies would be better focused on their ever increasing charges for government services and their subsequent tax-gouging of Virginia taxpayers.

Walter E. Williams
March 21, 2004
 
2004-08-21 02:47:37 PM
bjalfi

All this bs, presumably by people who may not have even read the article, and no one's even commented on the sad humor of the place being called "Payless". Heh.

Speaking of reading the article, I did, and noticed that the Florida Attorney General beat everyone to it. Besides, there were and are far more pressing points to be made about this case, and unethical/illegal business practices in general.
 
2004-08-21 02:49:10 PM
Ummmm, I'm a big fan of free markets, but I also am a big fan of "accidents" at places where someone acts like a total piece of crap when there is a time of need.

More importantly LYING is not part of a FREE MARKET.
 
2004-08-21 02:51:51 PM
Windfall profits are one of the vital signals of the marketplace. It's a signal saying that there are unmet human wants, leading people to strive to meet those wants. It stimulates the supply response to a disaster. Imagine for a moment that prices aren't allowed to rise. Would it be reasonable for anyone to expect workmen to give up their nights and weekends and drive hundreds of miles to Virginia to remove trees from people's houses?

This situation is different. The hotel was already there. The hotel operators did not drive hundreds of miles from another state with their hotel strapped to a trailer. (Oh wait; it's Florida; they may have.)
 
2004-08-21 02:52:16 PM
they actually corrected the headline?
 
2004-08-21 02:53:38 PM

I'm going to post an excerpt from the article gusto linked http://www.guardian.co.uk/september11/story/0,11209,601707,00.html

Starbucks charged rescuers for water

Staff and agencies
Wednesday September 26, 2001

A branch of the coffee chain Starbucks charged New York rescue workers for water to treat victims of the suicide attack on the World Trade Centre, it emerged today.
Ambulance workers were forced to scramble in their pockets for money to pay a $130 bill for three cases of water used to treat victims for shock after the twin towers collapsed.

***
If you have no problem with price gouging and the deceptive marketing that this hotel engaged in, then you should have no trouble with Starbuck's actions in this case.

Sarquad "Man you people paid attention in macroeconomics but slept through ethics

Hahaha thanks for summing up the thread, as well as the Libertarian party.

 
2004-08-21 02:55:49 PM
I have a hotel in Florida. One I can fully book if I set room rates at about 20bucks a night. Or I can fully book it at 120 a night for now. Which one should I do?

Those that use the expensive hotel will just have a nicer place to stay. Those that can't afford it will go to the Red Cross or National Guard post and camp out with them for a few days.

I haven't heard about any old ladies left in the field to die, just that they'd rather sleep in a hotel than in a middle school gym.
 
2004-08-21 02:56:10 PM
Who the f**k buys something (like a night in a hotel) before finding out the price? Especially in a time of heightened demand?

The primary function of the free market: rooting out the dumbasses.
 
2004-08-21 02:57:20 PM
I have a hotel in Florida. One I can fully book if I set room rates at about 20bucks a night. Or I can fully book it at 120 a night for now. Which one should I do?

DID YOU READ THE ARTICLE?

"All we have left is a suite..." (which happened to be a two bedroom normal hotel room)

Although it is pretty crappy of them, I would have no problem had they not lied their asses off.
 
2004-08-21 02:58:34 PM
This price gouging happened in the midst of the 3 weeks without power in Montreal, January 1998, due to freak icing destroying power lines.. some convenience stores tried to ridiculous amounts for simple items like batteries.. but there was an immidiate outcry, and the price hikes were shortlived.. it sux, but people are greedy, thankfully back then, good prevailed.
 
2004-08-21 03:00:00 PM
tallguywithglasses:

Starbucks had every right to charge whatever they want for their water. You have every right to not buy there anymore if you don't want to.

The trick is, the government has no right to get involved.
 
2004-08-21 03:08:01 PM
jack21221

What Walter E. Williams doesn't address is that letter is that the sheer volume of demand created by such a distaster is in itself a windfall for providers of good and services. Volumes that, without the disaster, those providing good and services would not see.

Take a roofing contractor, for example. Normally, the business model provides that you have to spend at least some of your resources on marketing. That is, seeking customers and creating demand for your good or service. True, what you spend on marketing can usually be expected to make some kind of return on the investment, if you are truely providing a viable good or service. But in the case of a hurricane, so many people have damaged roofs that contractors only have to spend a fraction, if anything at all, of their normal marketing costs. This cost saving is one type of windfall.

A second windfall comes from that fact that there is normally some about of idle time. That is, when there's not enough work to use 100% of your capacity to provide a good or service. A disaster such as a hurricane provides the contractor in this example to generate revenue at a maximum rate for an extended period of time.

Additionally, while the contracter may travel to another region to fill a demand, they will still have demand in their customary markets. When combined with the first two windfalls I've described, this contractor may have the ability to expand it's ability to provide a good and service, and provide more funds with which they can further market their goods and services.

In summary, one does not have to increase prices in such a situation to experience a windfall. Doing so may be seen as icing on the cake, though myself and some other would simply see it for what it really it: Overzealous greed.
 
2004-08-21 03:10:42 PM
ricbach229

Hahahahaha for a second there, I thought that you actually owned a hotel in Florida and were going to provide us with some insight. Then, as I continued to read your post, I realized that you were still talking out of your ass.

 
2004-08-21 03:12:10 PM
You know what? fark the free market. It brought us slavery, child labor, and the concept has no use for things like environmental regulations or safety standards.

Have some decency and compassion.

Revoke civil rights for non-people NOW! Passion and bulging veins! Blaarg!
 
2004-08-21 03:13:03 PM
Psychonaut

I live on the Texas coast. This type of stuff is no news to us. Happens everywhere during hurricane season, I assume. So, as you can see, I can take time to laugh. Especially since a good deal of our place was destroyed in the last hurricane. Anyway.
 
2004-08-21 03:14:40 PM
I especially love all the false-righteous comments like "they are just taking money without giving anything back."

If I was a hotel owner, and that was the thanks I got then I'd kick everybody out and shut the doors for two weeks. Then you'll see exactly how much those rooms were worth.

Profits in a free market reflect the social good done by the person. Say kiwi fruit is cheap on the West Coast but really expensive on the East. You could buy it on the West, ship it East, and make a bundle. In the process you are giving the people something they didn't have but wanted -- the condition of high demand to short supply is what gave the high prices in the first place. The guy that fixes this embalance reaps the reward for his service.

Same thing here, giving people to stay during a vacation isn't that great a thing, but people can still make a but. But giving people a place to stay after everyone's homes have been destroyed is something else. They deserve higher profits from satisfying a greater need. And the market supplies that.

The greedy ones are the people demanding something from someone else without paying the market price for it. THAT is greed -- wanting what someone else has and not being willing to give them something of equal value in exchange for it.
 
2004-08-21 03:18:54 PM
And now for something completely different....


 
2004-08-21 03:18:58 PM
Cato - I feel for you and your fellow heartless greedheads, more than I do the thousands of stricken hurricane refugees. I buy your twisted definition of greed, even at the 300% markup price.

Now watch as I cry you a river.
 
2004-08-21 03:19:05 PM
Cato, where are all these "false righteous" (is that a term you find yourself using a lot?) comments like "they are just taking money without giving anything back". I didn't see all of them.

"If I was a hotel owner, and that was the thanks I got then I'd kick everybody out and shut the doors for two weeks."

Dude, if you owned a hotel, you'd be bankrupt.

 
2004-08-21 03:24:59 PM
Cato - If you would read most of the comments you'd see thet the problem is the hotel charging these customers for something they didnt deliver on.(telling someone theyre getting a suite and giving them a double). It's called the old bait and switch.

Sure you could shut down for two weeks,go ahead just shows how much business sense you have. How about two months? That would show em!
 
2004-08-21 03:29:37 PM
Let's divide this thread into two sides please, so we can more easily organize our flame-war.

On the right, let's have our aggressive Free-market captialists

On the left, let's have our govt-controlled economy socialists.

Here, sticks in the middle. Have at it.

--

Now we can also categorize it easily as those who have been involved in a meaningful in business, and those who have never had any sort of meaningful role in the economy.

If the outlets there are required to fix their prices at a certain level, what incentive is there for them to go through the obscene extra efforts necessary both to provide that services or sell that good, and to support that service or resupply that good? Supply-lines break down. Every item that you want, must be trucked in and will probably have to be gotten at retail prices, because you'll likely have to send an employee out to get the item from wherever you can. It is thus more expensive for you to purchase whatever it takes for you to run your business. If your costs are higher, you will have to pass on those costs to stay in business.

Exactly how compassionate is it to force someone to go out of business by fixing their prices to low to allow them to pay operating costs?

Wait, I'm asking socialists to be logical...
 
2004-08-21 03:36:52 PM
yes, because we know that here in America, money and economics mean everything. Heaven forbid there is a law that limits the economic freedom of hotels after a hurricane because it is best for the general population.

On a side note, I live in America. I also enjoy this country very much... but the 'Money > All' mindset that many people have is just silly.
 
2004-08-21 03:47:54 PM
What the fark is this? Carpetbagger 2004?
You so-called 'supply and demand' folk know squat about the economy. We have exorbitant price hikes every Christmas on whatever new toy is in vogue for that year. THAT, O gluttonous ones, is a prime example of supply and demand. We see it every year.
HOWEVER...
During a disaster, it's not allowed BY LAW, and rightly so. Nothing quite as fulfilling as preying on human misery, is there?
You people should have a hole cut in your scrotum and have your collective legs run through it.
I own a heating and air business in NY. Oh my, your heat went out? And it's below freezing and you have small children and/or elderly? How much will it cost?

A lot.
But that's just an estimate.

/some people....
 
2004-08-21 03:56:06 PM
Spazzmatazz, it's remarkable how many of these people start their arguments "let's say I owned..." or "you're an owner of...", but how very few of them actually own a business in real life.
 
2004-08-21 04:06:20 PM
Ocala -- home of kids dressing as the KKK, teens having sex in the back of a car with their teacher and price gougers. They should change their city motto from "the brick city" to "the brick shiat city"...

And Isabel was no where near a category 5 hurricane -- only Andrew and Camille were category five (in the last 50 years or so) -- the damage from Isabel can't be compared to Charley.
 
2004-08-21 04:09:17 PM
Scrotar:

Slavery and child labor are not the products of the free market system. They have been in practice for thousands of years, long before "evil" capitalism arrived.
 
2004-08-21 04:33:43 PM
The submitter apparently didn't read the article. This was the third hotel to be charged. And for those who argue "supply and demand", I only wish you get stuck in a situation like this sometime in your life. It's not a fair practice...it's exploitation. I'm all for capitalism, but this isn't about capitalism...it's about helping somebody out in an extremely desparate situation...these hotels are still able to make a profit, so those capitalistic rights aren't trampled on.
 
2004-08-21 04:45:56 PM
About twenty years ago, during the advance of the Panorama Fire on the mountain resort of Lake Arrowhead in Southern California, before the owner of Jensen's Market fled to safety, he said to Hell with it, and left his store wide open for anybody who needed anything to come get it.

Florida must be an awful place to live.
 
2004-08-21 04:47:34 PM
You know what? fark the free market. It brought us slavery, child labor, and the concept has no use for things like environmental regulations or safety standards.

Slavery contravenes the ideals of the free market, i.e. the free movement of labour.

Child labour has nothing to do with free market vs. socialism, but with to what extent children can be treated as adults.
 
2004-08-21 04:51:41 PM
Don Dokken:

Scrotar:

Slavery and child labor are not the products of the free market system. They have been in practice for thousands of years, long before "evil" capitalism arrived.


But they are allowed to continue simply because, in the absence of strong ethics, it is economically desirable to exploit such inexcusable practices in the name of profit. Perhaps not directly, but turning a blind eye to it (seeing no evil, hearing no evil, speaking no evil) and asking no questions is reaping the illicit rewards just the same.
 
2004-08-21 04:54:30 PM
Spazzmatazz nailed it, I thought. Respond to that one or don't respond at all.
 
2004-08-21 04:56:11 PM
Being a manager of a hotel I can say 129 a night for a room is not that bad if the hotel is sold out. when you check into a hotel you sign a statment with the rate on it. if you dont want to pay that dont stay there. now if they changed the price after they signed than the hotel is wronge. but we try to keep a room or two open no matter what incase someone needs moved. The room may only cost $99 but if you want one of my last two rooms its going to be about $149 or so. call it what you will but at the next exit there another three or four hotels and the one after that and so on... and if ya drive a little further the storm will miss you. you do not HAVE to stay in a hotel, you Want to stay in a hotel. its not like they were warned at the last second, you want them to rip down a billboard or change an add in a truckstop mag to raise there price? I've slept in my car infront of a hotel more than once because the prices were to high. just my 2 cents
 
2004-08-21 04:57:11 PM
 
2004-08-21 04:58:08 PM
Interesting how many farkers worship an economic system over helping their fellow man.

Explains a lot.
 
2004-08-21 05:04:12 PM
tallguywithglasseson
Been in business 2 years now, and considering that we haven't had a 90 degree day since June 9 here in NY, and I'm trying to sell air conditioning, and the economy feels like Herbert Hoover has been in office the last four years
Well......That's why I left out the word 'thriving'.
And with winter coming on, judging from the last 5 1/2 months, I'm actually expecting a all-winter low of about 70 degrees.

/praying for subzero temps soon.....Real damn soon
 
2004-08-21 05:12:25 PM
"Price Gouging" is unethical, but shouldn't be illegal.
 
2004-08-21 05:15:40 PM
Hey Just Ignorant I got my cable back today! Yea!!! I curled it up alongside the road real nice so the crews could find it (it was like nesting in a tree and a bunch of other stuff - I think it thought it was a snake or something) and they did!

Grizzly9279

Whenever there's a big convention, or tons of people coming into town, hotels always jack up the rates. Why is this a surprise? When they know they're going to fill beds, they charge as much as they think they can get away with....period. That's business folks.

Those people can choose to stay or go - they have free access to other alternatives and also the right to stay put. Down here - no such luck. These things blow through - you are "on your own for 72 hours" in the immortal words of chairman Crotty (our mayor in Orlando). That means, no phone, no lights, no motorcar (blocked roads - trashed cars - all sorts of stuff) no EMS, no Fire Crew and no Cops (in most cases because they can not get to you. BUT there ar exceptions and as I understand it EMS did get through to most places it just took a helluva lot longer). Your choices are extremely limited (to say the least). You are essentially out of farking luck and it is now time to forage or make do with what you have. This particular farking storm caught everyone by surprise (I personally needed a new set of underwear) and as a Hurricane of this magnitude has never EVER hit Orlando before - most people were not prepared (this thing traveled what - 200 miles across land to nail us??? WHHHHAAAAAAAT was THAT about??). This means that capitalism, with all its lovely perks and morality takes an amazing shiat while people scramble to get their act together and maintain calm. People flip the fark out. Being in a house with 105 mph SUSTAINED winds outside for a half hour can make the stoutest arse go code brown. Then your house takes a shiat - your yard takes a shiat, and then you gradually understand that your entire area is now sorta not looking right at all. If your car has taken a shiat - you are going to be hurting if you did not get supplies. There are no wreckers, no triple a, no Cops, nothing so if your car breaks or if you wreck you leave it there and walk back. There were cars piled up alongside 50 by me up until about Monday when the national Guard showed up - lookin' like Mad Max man.

Then, on top of all these which is enough to wreck your nerves for a while, you have no Electricity, no water (in my case - I have an electric pump) and God's own supply of Humidity (which cracked my farking windows and warped the fark out of my doors) and insects looking for high ground THAT BITE. The weather down here has been marvelous - like 90f in the daytime (heat index of 105f) and it will break your arse man. At he very least you will experience discomfort on a scale that due to your hard work and capitalist tendencies you feel you do not deserve (which is ridiculous but this is how people think).

There is no television (unless you have batteries which I did - yea!!!), no real communication and the news is all about how you should go here to get water, or food (the fire stations all had water but you had to bring your own bucket and stuff). There ARE pockets of civilization (like wateford lakes which never lostpower or cable) and you head for those but if you overshoot or get lost - there is NO gas either. So you rely on your nieghbors until that 72 hours pass and civilization starts to spread out and come for you.

In that time period, obviously, you are vulnerable. It is an artificial economy based on frustration and WANT for basic necessities, information, and an overwhelming drive to protect your shiat and your family. This is why we have laws like this here, because it is at this time, the 1.4 million people that lost power during this storm (and no one knows how many exactly lost their homes) are at the mercy of whatever befalls them unless they have prepared. And man, NO ONE saw this thing hitting here (OK one guy did and everyone thought he was hyper because the weather service DID NOT) and by the time we figured it out everything was CLOSED. So do the math man. You can give people the necessities and ability to get back on with their lives or you can espouse a utopia that will inevitably result in people loosing their shiat and straining whatever vital services do exist. The effects of chaos in these situations is Long Term; the effects of order are short term. The less time we spend in chaos the less time it takes for everyone to get back into the system and keep on.

Besides, I would imagine insurance companies would pay for certain temporary housing options when your house gets blown away. Kind of like totalling your car, insurance companies pay for a rental until you buy a new car.

Yes this is true - and as I thought my foundation had shifted (pier construction - jury is still out on that) this was a decision I was seriously considering. BUT I have animals, and then there is the question of whether I want to leave my nieghbors in this shiat who also have animals and NEED help (my nieghbor's roof caved and my other nieghbor had to deal with four of my trees in her roof) or wait. I did spend nights at a friends house (that was packed with refugees) but had to come back here to make calls to adjusters, the red cross, FEMA, everybody as we had a farked up situation going on with massive amounts of downed trees.

Also - something you guys might not understand - Florida has special laws about insurance and Hurricanes. Most homes have a 2% Hurricane deductible which means 2% of the entire cost of your home. Most deductibles are between 10 - 15k down here, so many people are just farked regardless of having insurance or not. This is where FEMA takes over and helps, but FEMA only just got here 2 days ago and most people DO NOT realize FEMA will help (as will the Red Cross and the State). In general teh Fedral gubberment will bail your arse out but in the short term, boyhowdy, you better have some supplies and access to cash and food. Man do you realize we just got dairy products back in Orlando two days ago? Its a farking MESS out herein East Orlamdo but its getting MUCH MUCH better!
 
2004-08-21 05:40:54 PM
What everyone seems to be forgetting is common sense.

With Starbucks deciding to charge for the water they gave out (probably due to asinine strict adherence to company policy, see the Old Navy de facto bathroom incident) the company probably lost far, far more through bad public sentiment than what they recouped on the water.

If you have a business in a community, you'd better consider that your neighbors have a long memory, and if you pull stupid shiat like overcharging during an emergency, they will remember, and you will be rewarded in perpetuity by people who will boycott you for your asshattery.

In the case of this POS motel, since probably 90+% of their clientele are people just passing through, they don't have to worry about offending the locals. They don't need the locals' biz.

And what the hotel did with bait-and-switch, etc. is just wrong, and a whole other unethical situation.

But guaranteed once they sold out their last room at $30/night, someone would've come along and said "I would've paid you double for that room." They just mitigated that situation in advance.
 
2004-08-21 05:56:11 PM
If you have a business in a community, you'd better consider that your neighbors have a long memory, and if you pull stupid shiat like overcharging during an emergency, they will remember, and you will be rewarded in perpetuity by people who will boycott you for your asshattery.

Yeah for certain. Publix (a southern grocery chain) gave out free ice and water all week. I guarantee you no one will forget that. I for damn sure won't.
 
2004-08-21 06:07:41 PM
You liberals crack me up. "Price gouging is unfair! it's illegal! Lock em up and throw away the key!" Let's just think about one little thing shall we?

Let's imagine that someone from lets say Raleigh North Carolina decides hes going to help out and try to make a little money for himself in the process. He buys 100 power generators, loads them into his rig, and heads down to Florida. So at this point, he's having to pay for his fuel, time, wear and tear on the rig, insurance, the power generators etc. So already he's at a huge loss money wise.

He gets to Florida, and decides he's going to charge 3 times the amount that he paid for the power generators, to cover all his time and expenses. He sets up shop, and is instantly told by the police and local government, sorry you cant sell any of those here.

Meanwhile theres 1,000 people without power, desperate to do anything to get their power restored. The guy has some generators, the people need some, the guy has a selling price, the people if they need a power generator badly enough will pay that price.

But noooooo, instead the truck driver is turned away, and no one gets power generators, and no one gets power restored, and the residents wonder why have all these people forsaken them. Well there you go folks. Who's at fault here?

Stupid Florida government, I hope the residents sue your asses off for doing stupid crap like this.
 
2004-08-21 06:22:05 PM
Red,

Sounds like if your truck driver was a real businessman, he wouldn't be driving to a disaster-zone with a truck full of generators at a jacked-up price.

Yeah....stooooooooopid Florida government! LOL?

Ah you Repubs....modern-day carpetbaggers......

 
2004-08-21 06:24:34 PM
Let's imagine that someone from lets say Raleigh North Carolina decides hes going to help out and try to make a little money for himself in the process. He buys 100 power generators, loads them into his rig, and heads down to Florida. So at this point, he's having to pay for his fuel, time, wear and tear on the rig, insurance, the power generators etc. So already he's at a huge loss money wise.

He gets to Florida, and decides he's going to charge 3 times the amount that he paid for the power generators, to cover all his time and expenses. He sets up shop, and is instantly told by the police and local government, sorry you cant sell any of those here.


You do realize that if the guy can prove that - he is protected? The law only punishes those people who gouge dramatically above costs. The law states specifically that charging higher prices due to increased costs is all good. Transportation is one of the covered costs. We all know it costs more to truck shiat in from out of state after a Hurricane, for starters.
 
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